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. Benko 2014 Benko, Elek : Gertrúd királyné sírja a pilisi ciszterci monostorban [The Grave of Queen Gertrude in the Cistercian Monastery of Pilis] , in

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Red Queen: host-parasite coevolution selects for biparental sex . Science , 333 , 216 – 218 . Neisser , U. , Boodoo , G. , Bouchard Jr , T. J. , Boykin , A. W. , Brody , N. , Ceci , S. J. , Halpern , D. F. , Lochlin , J. C

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The warrior queen

The cult of Hellenistic female rulers as the basis of their symbolic participation in military acts

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Lucyna Kostuch

–316; Kuttner, A. : Cabinet fit for a Queen: The Lithika as Posidippus’ Gem Museum. In Gutzwiller, K. (ed.): The New Posidippus: A Hellenistic Poetry Book . Oxford 2005, 141–163; Carney, E. D. : Arsinoë of Egypt and Macedon: A Royal Life . Oxford 2013

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Based on written and oral evidence, the present study focuses on Romanian Herodias’ various hypostases: biblical queen, queen of the fairies, sovereign of the căluşari . The canonic, apocryphal and magical writings referring to Herodias are considered as some of the most significant testimonies about this character. Such texts present the image of Herodias as biblical queen who provoked the decapitation of John the Baptist, as it was promoted in 17 th –18 th -century Romanian literature; they also represent an important document for deciding whether a certain apocryphal tradition influenced Romanian folk beliefs related to the malevolent fairies. The study of the oral evidence investigates how Romanian folk beliefs assimilated the story of St John’s decapitation and transformed it into traditional legends and inquires whether these new compositions had an effect on Herodias’ traditional roles, those of queen of the fairies and patroness of the căluşari . Finally, the research attempts to describe how Herodias’ beneficial functions are put into the shade by a powerful Christian opponent.

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. Theor. Biol. 197 149 162 Khibnik, A. I. and Kondrashov, A. S. (1997): Three mechanisms of Red Queen

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1441 Vander Meer, R. K., Preston, C. A., Hefetz, A. (2008) Queen regulates biogenic amine level and nestmate recognition in workers of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta . Naturwissenschaften

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Abstract

Giulia Grisi (1811–1869), the first Adalgisa in Vincenzo Bellini's Norma (Milan, 1831), broke her Italian contract and left for Paris in 1832, where she became prima donna under Gioachino Rossini at the Théâtre Italien. In addition, she made her London debut in 1834, replacing Maria Malibran in the young Victoria's eyes and ears with her singing, acting, and flawless beauty, especially in the operas of the future Queen's favourite, Vincenzo Bellini. Grisi's real goal, however, was to conquer Giuditta Pasta's throne by embodying Norma: she first performed the role in London in 1835, and then in almost every season until 1861. Despite her success, she was unjustly attacked for copying Pasta, as established by Thomas G. Kaufman. Bellini himself likewise misjudged her, stating that “the elevated characters she does not understand, does not feel, because she has neither the instinct nor the education to sustain them with the nobility and the lofty style they demand.” “In Norma she will be a nonentity; … the role of Adalgisa is the only one suited to her character.” Nonetheless, even hostile critics like Henry F. Chorley had to acknowledge that “her Norma, doubtless her grandest performance … was an improvement on the model [i.e. Pasta]; … there was in it the wild ferocity of the tigress, but a certain frantic charm therewith, which carried away the hearer – nay, which possibly belongs to the true reading of the character.” The purpose of this article is to investigate Grisi's London reception, primarily in the context of her Norma performances.

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Science (WoS) read like grim tales of the Brothers Grimm, featuring WoS as the “Queen of Mean” (mean in the sense of evil and as statistical average), with the 2 and 5 year impact factors (JIF-2 and JIF-5), the Eigenfactor score (EFS), and the article

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Abstract  

Paper presented at the conference 'Literary Histories and the Development of Identities' sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada involving members of the I.C.L.A. Coordinating Committee at Queen's University, Canada, in the Fall of 2001.

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Abstract  

Paper presented at the conference 'Literary Histories and the Development of Identities' sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada involving members of the I.C.L.A. Coordinating Committee at Queen's University, Canada, in the Fall of 2001.

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