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This article combines a rational choice framework with an analysis of contemporary European Union institutions to elucidate the causes of Grexit and Brexit. It shows that the sustainability of the EU in part or whole in “normal” times depends on member compatibility and coercive adaptation. If members share the same values, including a common vision of transnational governance and a commitment to mutual support (solidarity), the EU should be able to stick together through thick and thin. If, on the contrary, members hold incompatible outlooks on the distribution of transnational powers and solidarity, then the EU will be vulnerable to dismemberment. The EU today is prone to disunion because its members no longer share a common view of mutually acceptable transnational government and policy; powerful members insist upon bending recalcitrant members to their will (coercive adaptation), and participants hold contradictory attitudes towards solidarity on a variety of issues. Winston Churchill and Robert Schuman in the late 1940s hoped that their post-war Europe project would be something more than a “single market”; that it would become the cornerstone of European peace. They appreciated the value of cooperative economy, but considered material benefits icing on the cake. Brexit and Grexit are best seen in this larger perspective underscoring the wisdom of conciliation.

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Metatheoretical studies often characterise rational choice theory (RCT) based empirical research as predominantly qualitative and illustrative. In this short (and selective) methodological survey we investigate the oppurtinities and limits of quantitative empirical researches that adopt the framework of the RCT paradigm. Unlike many other methodological studies, this paper does not focus on a general comparsion of RCT with compenting paradigms. instead, we take the framework of RCT as given, and study the  methodological problems RCT researchers face while testing their theoretical models. We survey possibile research-startegies, and examine the impact of the level of analysis on model building and on the results. Moreover, we summarise  the motivational assumptions of sociological RCT. Besides, we examine those extensions of the RCT that take into account the problem of proplem of perception. Afterwards we present a regression technique that is directly build on utility-theory. Finally, a residual method for measuring non-egoistic motivations will be discussed.

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Recent enthusiasms have emphasised particularly ideas of “learning organisations”, calling attention both to the ways organisations learn and to the possibilities for improving organisational intelligence through increasing the rate and precision of learning. These enthusiasms have often encouraged the too easy assumption that learning processes necessarily lead to organisational improvement. The usefulness of learning as an instrument of organisational intelligence has to be demonstrated, not assumed. Adaptive processes such as learning are not guaranteed to reach or sustain a global maximum on an outcome surface. In order for proposals for “learning organisations” to be more than vague wishes for improvement, learning must be defined in terms of some specific process and the conditions under which that process does or does not lead to improvement must be established. This essay is built around six simple propositions, a kind of catechism for consideration of learning as an instrument of intelligence.

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Abstract  

The theory of errors of three variants of sub- and super equivalence method is given and errors for typical cases are tabulated. The principles of the variants are described. Recommendations are offered for a rational choice of a variant to be used and for that of the parameter . For the calculations the assumption is used that the analysis is based on the solvent-extraction equilibrium+ A+BABorg.

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47 68 Berger, J. — Offe, C. (1982): Functionalism vs. Rational Choice? Some Questions concerning the Rationality of Choosing One or the Other. Theory and Society 11(4): 521

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Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle
Authors:
Gábor Flaskay
,
Judit Navracsics
,
Csaba Pléh
, and
László Lippai

. ( 1990 ). Az örömtelen gazdaság. Gazdaságlélektani alapvetések . Budapest : Közgazdasági és Jogi Könyvkiadó Scott , J. ( 2000 ). Rational choice theory . In G. Browning

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Blais, A. (2000): To Vote or Note To Vote? The Merits and Limits of Rational Choice Theory . Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh. To Vote or Note To Vote? The Merits and Limits of Rational Choice Theory

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E. Yu. , Kokhanchikov L. A. Mathematical model of rational choice of routes in transportation management system of finished products (in Russian) , Modern Problems of Science and Education , No. 5, 2013 , http

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Lindenberg, S. (1992): The Method of Decreasing Abstraction. In Coleman, J. S. and Fararo, T. J. (eds.): Rational Choice Theory. Advocacy and Critique . Newbury Park: Sage, 3-20. Rational Choice Theory. Advocacy and

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