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, 2017 ). In particular, increasing evidence indicates that the field of addiction research is moving towards the recovery paradigm, a concept that has increased in importance in mental health practice and research over the past few decades. In the field

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Australian sample, women are more likely (56% vs. 36%) to recover ( Slutske, Blaszczynski, & Martin, 2009 ) than men. Gender is an important consideration in recovery processes since obstacles and the resources needed to overcome addiction may

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result of the negative consequences of gambling behavior ( Jauregui et al., 2017 ). Recovery is a generic term indicative of adaptive changes in psychosocial functioning and/or a reduction in symptomatology and is one of the pillars of gambling

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Moffett, S., Snyder, K. (1985) Behavioral recovery associated with central nervous system regeneration in the snail Melampus . J. Neurobiol. 16 , 193–209. Snyder K. Behavioral

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Belle Gavriel-Fried
,
Meytal Serry
,
Dana Katz
,
Dorottya Hidvégi
,
Zsolt Demetrovics
, and
Orsolya Király

Introduction This scoping review was designed to systematically map the literature on recovery from gaming disorder (GD). Gaming disorder (GD) is a relatively new mental disorder. It refers to persistent gaming behavior (online as well as offline

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Introduction Addiction recovery, including gambling disorder (GD), is a process of change, and holistic improvement in the individual's well-being and life domains despite the obstacles and challenges inherent to this

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temporary and end-match neuromuscular fatigue ( 35 ). Indeed, muscle fatigue is a limiting factor for athletic performance ( 43 ) and is associated with increased injury rates ( 15 ). Thereby, recovery strategies during periods of intense training or

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and recoveries tend to affect all parts (regions and provinces) of a country, there is usually a widespread territorial variation about when recessions and recoveries start and what is their extent and duration. This is indeed the case with the GR in

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To clarify the ventilatory kinetics during recovery after impulse-like exercise, subjects performed one impulse-like exercise test (one-impulse) and a five-times repeated impulse-like exercises test (five-impulse). Duration and intensity of the impulse-like exercise were 20 sec and 400 watts (80 rpm), respectively. Although blood pH during recovery (until 10 min) was significantly lower in the five-impulse test than in the one-impulse test, ventilation (.VE) in the two tests was similar except during the first 30 sec of recovery, in which it was higher in the five-impulse test. In one-impulse, blood CO2 pressure (PCO2) was significantly increased at 1 min during recovery and then returned to the pre-exercise level at 5 min during recovery. In the five-impulse test, PCO2 at 1 min during recovery was similar to the pre-exercise level, and then it decreased to a level lower than the pre-exercise level at 5 min during recovery. Accordingly, PCO2 during recovery (until 30 min) was significantly lower in the five-impulse than in one-impulse test..VE and pH during recovery showed a curvilinear relationship, and at the same pH, ventilation was higher in the one-impulse test. These results suggest that ventilatory kinetics during recovery after impulse-like exercise is attributed partly to pH, but the stimulatory effect of lower pH is diminished by the inhibitory effect of lower PCO2.

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To determine that whether arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) affects ventilation ( \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E) during recovery from impulse-like exercises of various intensities, subjects performed four impulse-like tests with different workloads. Each test consisted of a 20-sec impulse-like exercise at 80 rpm and 60-min recovery. Blood samples were collected at rest and during recovery to measure blood ions and gases. \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E was measured continuously during rest, exercise and recovery periods. A significant curvilinear relationship was observed between \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E and pH during recovery from the 300- and 400-watt tests in all subjects. \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E was elevated during recovery from the 100-watt test despite no change in any of the humoral factors. Arterialized carbon dioxide (PaCO2) kinetics showed fluctuation, being increased at 1 min and decreased at 5 min during recovery, and this fluctuation was more enhanced with increase in exercise intensity. There was a significant relationship between \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E and PaCO2 during recovery from the 300- and 400-watt tests in all subjects. The results of the present study demonstrate that pH and neural factors drive \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E during recovery from impulse-like exercise and that fluctuation in PaCO2 controls \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\dot V$ \end{document} E as a feedback loop and this feedback function is more enhanced as the work intensity increases

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