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Abstract  

Thermal degradation of granite and marble industry reject (GMIR), a red clay (RC)and their composites were studied by non-isothermal thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) in nitrogen atmosphere, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and derivative thermogravimetry(DTG) in air atmosphere. Measurements were made in the temperature range of 25–1000,25–1200 and 25–1400C. The kinetic parameters were determined by Flynn–Wall and Kissinger's methods. The results indicate the absent dominance of one mechanism of reaction, and the composites show smaller values of kinetic parameters than GMIR or RC.

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Abstract  

Using the data of a comprehensive evaluation study on the peer review process of Angewandte Chemie International Edition (AC-IE), we examined in this study the way in which referees’ comments differ on manuscripts rejected at AC-IE and later published in either a low-impact journal (Tetrahedron Letters, n = 54) or a high-impact journal (Journal of the American Chemical Society, n = 42). For this purpose, a content analysis was performed of comments which led to the rejection of the manuscripts at AC-IE. For the content analysis, a classification scheme with thematic areas developed by Bornmann et al. (<cite>2008</cite>) was used. As the results of the analysis demonstrate, a large number of negative comments from referees in the areas “Relevance of contribution” and “Design/Conception” are clear signs that a manuscript rejected at AC-IE will not be published later in a high-impact journal. The number of negative statements in the areas “Writing/Presentation,” “Discussion of results,” “Method/Statistics,” and “Reference to the literature and documentation,” on the other hand, had no statistically significant influence on the probability that a rejected manuscript would later be published in a low- or high-impact journal. The results of this study have various implications for authors, journal editors and referees.

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Abstract  

The case of Dr. Hwang Woo Suk, the South Korean stem-cell researcher, is arguably the highest profile case in the history of research misconduct. The discovery of Dr. Hwang’s fraud led to fierce criticism of the peer review process (at Science). To find answers to the question of why the journal peer review system did not detect scientific misconduct (falsification or fabrication of data) not only in the Hwang case but also in many other cases, an overview is needed of the criteria that editors and referees normally consider when reviewing a manuscript. Do they at all look for signs of scientific misconduct when reviewing a manuscript? We conducted a quantitative content analysis of 46 research studies that examined editors’ and referees’ criteria for the assessment of manuscripts and their grounds for accepting or rejecting manuscripts. The total of 572 criteria and reasons from the 46 studies could be assigned to nine main areas: (1) ‘relevance of contribution,’ (2) ‘writing / presentation,’ (3) ‘design / conception,’ (4) ‘method / statistics,’ (5) ‘discussion of results,’ (6) ‘reference to the literature and documentation,’ (7) ‘theory,’ (8) ‘author’s reputation / institutional affiliation,’ and (9) ‘ethics.’ None of the criteria or reasons that were assigned to the nine main areas refers to or is related to possible falsification or fabrication of data. In a second step, the study examined what main areas take on high and low significance for editors and referees in manuscript assessment. The main areas that are clearly related to the quality of the research underlying a manuscript emerged in the analysis frequently as important: ‘theory,’ ‘design / conception’ and ‘discussion of results.’

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Abstract  

I review and discuss instances in which 19 future Nobel Laureates encountered resistance on the part of the scientific community towards their discoveries, and instances in which 24 future Nobel Laureates encountered resistance on the part of scientific journal editors or referees to manuscripts that dealt with discoveries that later would earn them the Nobel Prize.

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In the 1960s, students attending the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts – especially female students of sculpture — were socialised in a strange way. This ‘strangeness’ was generated by the latent tension between contradictory values, conflicting motivations and interests — and women were exposed to these dualities a great deal more than men. Being students of sculpture only amplified the effect on them, and overshadowed it with negative stereotypes. The case study sheds light on the latent motives of the rejection of a diploma work made by a female art student, Ildikó Várnagy in socialist Hungary. It examines the case, in the frame of art education and sculpture in the Sixties, as well as gender bias at the Art Academy in Hungary, and also outlines the effects of this incident on her later carrier as an artist.

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plural, summarizing generation Z's opinions. The hypothesis of the research was that adolescents reject many stereotypes, especially the ones that are in connection with conscious behaviour in the online space; on the other hand, according to students

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to what extent the single publication h index of manuscripts submitted to AC-IE and published in the journal or rejected by the journal and published elsewhere is systematically associated (1) with the publication decision of the AC-IE editors

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., Shepherd, G. E. (1994): How are the Mighty Fallen: Rejected Classic Articles by Leading Economists. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 8(1): 165-180. How are the Mighty Fallen: Rejected Classic Articles by Leading Economists

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