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The responsory — a genre originated in early period of Gregorian chant, but also increasing in number until the end of the Middle Ages — is expected as transmitted in a rather stable melodic shape. The paper lists and analyses, however, 27 items with more than one melody and with variants in a wide scope of modes. In addition, 15 tunes are listed that has been adapted as contrafacta (and not as a model-melody) to new texts. These latter include not only parts of saints’ offices but also items belonging to the temporale part of the office.

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Balther of Säckingen was a remarkable scholar, writer and composer, who was born about 930, made bishop of Speyer in 970, and died in 986 or 987. Educated at the famous monastery in St. Gallen, he went as a wandering student in search of learning as far as North Spain. He had a special veneration for St Fridolin, founder of a convent in Säckingen. On his travels Balther found a copy of a Life of St Fridolin, memorized it, wrote it down on his return home, composed chants to be sung on the feast day of the saint, and sent both the Life (vita) and the chants (historia) to one of his former teachers at St. Gallen for approval. Balther says he composed them “per musicam artem”, “according to the art of music”. This paper tells how Balther’s chants came to be composed and compares them with others in order to understand what was considered to be “musical art” around 970.

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Only two of the five polyphonic settings of St Anne’s liturgy in the 16th-century Vesperale Anna Hannsen Schuman at the Slovenský Národný Archív in Bratislava are correctly texted. This paper shows how the rhymed responsory Iesu Christe nepos cuius tu could be identified and the texts of the rhymed antiphons O beata Christi ava and Annae sanctae celebremus complemented by consulting a plainchant source from Kirnberg an der Mank in lower Austria.

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The study examines recently found fragments of the Buda Antiphonal. The codex, containing Office chants representing the Esztergom liturgical tradition, was notated at the end of the 15th century with Messine-Hungarian mixed notation. 21 folios, originating from its beginning and preserved at the National Széchényi Library (Budapest), were identified by László Dobszay in 1978. Fragments of the same antiphonal surfaced recently in two collections from Slovakia: 7 folios, with summer and autumn historiae as well as antiphons for Sundays in ordinary time, in the archives of the Saint Adalbert Association (Trnava) and a single truncated folio, with responsories for Christmas Matins, in the music collection of the Slovak National Museum.

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the discussion of the fragment in vol. 3 pp. 256–257, or to the index of volume 2. Only at these places do we learn that the tiny piece of parchment transmits the end of the responsory Patriacharum semine followed by the verse Nobilis haec clara

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libri 2, par = De non parcendo in Deum delinquentibus ; NIC = Nicetas of Remesiana, ut = De utilitate hymnorum ; PAU-N = Paulinus of Nola, ep = Epistulae ; RES-R = Roman Responsory; TE = Tertullian of Carthage, cor = De corona, je = De

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