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I collected stories of conversion from university students in Kolozsvár/Cluj. They had come into contact with representatives of the revival movement and constructed their own identities under the influence of the identity patterns conveyed by these people. The conversion means that their relationship with God becomes personal in that they accept salvation from sin for themselves, declare themselves to be the children of God and place their lives under His guidance. This goes together with a new way of life involving daily reading and interpretation of the Bible, impromptu personal prayers and participation in charity work. In the stories of conversion they speak about this new identity and the process through which they changed their identities. Parallel with the restructuring of the individual identity the collective identity also changes since, from the time of their conversion, they regard themselves as members of the community and the activity of the community extends to all fields of life: Bible hours, religious services, sports, summer camps, film club, etc.

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language revival movement. The new paradigm became widely used in fiction in a few decades, and its use became the expectation in schools ( Simonyi, 1906a , p. 51). Révai himself wrote that it is the job of the school to stabilize the forms he considered

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This paper, based on participant research amongst folk revivalists, interviews with cultural managers, and extensive archival research, discusses the táncház (dance house) folk revival movement as the actualization of interwar efforts of “folk national cultivation” in Hungary. By putting the dance house in relationship with interwar folk critiques, the paper illustrates both continuities and discontinuities between them, most notably in conceptualizations of the relationship between the ethical or political roles of such critiques and of the folk itself. The paper argues that folk critiques, now and then, can play an important role in state formation by reproducing the folk and acting to secure its citizenship. Nevertheless, how the folk is defined is historically determined, as is the kind of citizenship entailed. Since folk national cultivation is premised on the idea that Hungarianness is produced through engagement with the folk and its traditions, the historical approach of this paper problematizes this process.

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Die ungarische Tanzhaus-Bewegung

Ein Beispiel für Volkskultur in der Moderne

Hungarian Studies
Author: Julia Hell

Est (2009) EST.hu — Zene, koncert, buli. Online unter: http://www.est.hu/zene . Zugriff am 30.03.2009 Frigyesi, J. (1996) The Aesthetic of the Hungarian Revival Movement. In Mark Slobin (ed.) Retuning Culture — Musical

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Heritage and the Museum — New Perspectives on Cultural Preservation . Walnut Creek : Left Coast Press Inc . B akka , Egil 1992 : Heir, User or Researcher. Basic Attitudes within the Norwegian Revival Movement . In: L outzaki , I. (ed

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. Justice Interruptus: Critical Reflections on the “Postsocialist” Condition 1997 Frigyesi , Judit 1996: The Aesthetic of the Hungarian Revival Movement. In: Slobin , Mark (ed.): Retuning Culture

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Aesthetic of the Hungarian Revival Movement . In Slobin , Mark (ed.) Returning Culture. Musical Changes in Central and Eastern Europe , 54 – 75 . Durham and London : Duke University Press . Gulyás , Judit – Szemerkényi , Ágnes – Landgraf

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unfriendliness and a resistance against the works of the co-operatives, it might be better to consider it as a new direction and new attitude in their case, having regard to the transformation of the co-operatives and the history of the revival movement

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, examines elements of Klez-mer music in the third movement of Symphony No. 1. The expression “Klezmer,” adopted by the revival movement which blossomed, amongst other locales, in the United States, referred in Knapp’s case to a broader term for Jewish

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opinion, understanding of either the historical changes taking place in traditional dance culture or the operating mechanisms and the impact of the revival movement so closely connected with the realm of tradition is also quite difficult to achieve without

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