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Satire 4 is one of the most-criticized poems of Juvenal. Because of its structural problems, certain scholars have even casted doubts on its unity considering it as two fragments patched together by a later editor. The key to understand the satire’s structure is the connection between its two main parts and the central figures thereof, Crispinus and Domitian. Apart from the structural problems, this paper also deals with certain features of the mock-epic as well as the targets of the invective.

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This paper analyzes the moral purpose that guides and determines the two works by Agathias, the epigrams and the Histories. We study his statements in this respect, and then, a literary resource that appears in his poetry and in his historical work: the presence of characters and anecdotes with cynical undertones, the effect of which is that his works may often be considered satirical. Finally, the very likely relationship between his ideas of the value of history and many of his satirical portraits and those of Lucian is studied as well.

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The question of the relationship between Juvenal and Quintilian is still unanswered: the reconstruction of their possible biographical and literary connections is very uncertain. The Life of Juvenal does not mention Quintilian; its author only states that Juvenal spent a significant part of his life declaiming. Their personal acquaintance is not confirmed by any ancient source, and the views of modern research are not univocal either. In his Institutes Quintilian declares concerning the satire that in his age there are satirists who will be famous in the future. However, research is very careful about the question whether Quintilian referred to Juvenal with these words. On the basis of the biographical data, it cannot even be proven with certainty that Juvenal had known Quintilian, thus we have to find evidence in the texts of the two authors. In this paper, I examine the possible influence of Quintilian on Juvenal’s Satire 1, by highlighting textual and thematic parallels, as well as common motifs, in order to unfold the relation between Satire 1, the Institutes, and the Minor Declamations attributed to Quintilian.

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A 3. szatíra Iuvenalis életművének egyik legtöbbre tartott, egyben legkülönlegesebb darabja. Egy rövid bevezető után a mű csaknem egészét egy Umbriciusnak nevezett interlocutor monológja tölti ki, melyben megindokolja, hogy miért költözik Cumae-ba Rómából. Umbricius más iuvenalisi interlocutorokhoz képest jóval összetettebb alak, akinek különböző vonásait különböző forrásokra és ihletőkre vezethetjük vissza, s ez áttételesen a 3. szatíra egészére is igaz, mert benne az epikus hagyomány, a bukolikus költészet és Martialis hatása egyaránt jelentős.

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Iuvenalis 4. szatírája az életmű egyik legtöbbet kritizált darabja. A szerkezeti problémák miatt egyes kutatók a mű eredeti egységességét is kétségbe vonják azt feltételezve, hogy két, egy későbbi kiadó által összefércelt töredékből áll. A struktúra megértésének kulcsa a két fő szerkezeti egység, s ezzel együtt a két központi karakter, Crispinus és Domitianus közötti kapcsolat feltárása. Az alábbi tanulmány a szerkezeti problémák mellett a mű epikus jellegzetességeivel, illetve az invektíva célpontjaival foglalkozik.

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Verflüchtigung von Satire im Gleich-Wertigen Allerlei?

Anmerkungen zu Wirkungspotentialen “satirischer Texte” unter den Bedingungen der “Postmoderne” am Beispiel von B. Strauss' “Kalldewey, Farce”

Neohelicon
Author: Klaus Schwind
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This article is a continuation of a study published in AOH 66/1 (2013), pp. 25–45 entitled “What makes a good poet according to Someśvaradeva? Poetic merit, demerit and the ethics of poetry in the Surathotsava and the Kīrtikaumudī”. It provides the texts and the first English translations of several verses concerning ethics (Surathotsava 1.1–1.64 and Kīrtikaumudī 1.1–1.47) by the 13th-century poet Someśvaradeva, which had formed the basis of the analysis in that study. The edited texts here improve upon the older published versions, and, in the case of the Surathotsava, utilise textual variants and glosses to difficult puns not given in the printed text, by additionally taking into account two manuscripts.

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