Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • "selenium content" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

. 138 145 150 Stijve, T. (1977): Selenium content of mushrooms. Z. Lebensmitteln Unters.- Forsch. , 164 , 201-203. Selenium

Restricted access

Abstract  

Photon activation analysis has been developed to determine the selenium content. The method can be applied for continuous monitoring of the addition of selenium to animal food-stuff.

Restricted access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors: L. Bóna, N. Adányi, R. Farkas, E. Szanics, E. Szabó, Gy. Hajós, A. Pécsváradi, and E. Ács

Murphy, J. & Cashman, K.D. (2001): Selenium content of a range of Irish foods. Fd. Chem. , 74 , 493–498. Cashman K.D. Selenium content of a range of Irish foods

Restricted access

Abstract  

Samples of hair from 370 subjects were analysed by neutron activation. The samples were taken from residents of nine different countries: Japan, France, Ivory Coast, Brasil, Paraguay, Canary Islands, Papua New Guinea, Italy and New Zealand. The selenium determination was made using the76Se(n,)77mSe reaction.It was found that the average selenium concentration in the hair of Japanese subjects, both those living in Japan and those living in foreign countries was higher (total average: 0.59±0.14 mg/kg) than those of subjects from other countries (total average: 0.42±0.13 mg/kg).Our results from the determination of the selenium concentration in the hair of individuals from different countries show significant differences between different countries, nevertheless, the selenium content in human hair was small amounts. Since this is likely due to differences in diet. This method was able to analyze quickly for many samples.

Restricted access

Summary  

Selenium is a required trace-element that has been found to be protective against serious chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease in some, but not all, epidemiological studies using both case-control and intervention designs. As a result, the fraction of the adult U.S. population now taking a daily selenium supplement is steadily increasing. In this study, we analyzed 10 or more replicate Se supplement tablets, from each of 15 different products representing 12 different brand names with most being sampled at two different times separated by approximately 30 months. Two chemical forms, seleno-yeast and selenate were tested in 50, 100 and 200 µg/tablet dosages (seleno-yeast) and 25 and 200 µg/tablet dosages (selenate). Variations in contemporary lots were evaluated at both sampling periods. The Se content provided on the product label is generally understated. One tablet contained 2.5 times more selenium than the stated dose. Selenate supplements are less accurately labeled and more highly variable compared to yeast supplements. One popular multivitamin, labeled at 200 µg/tablet, contained tablets in excess of 300 µg. Many subjects using this supplement will exceed the 400 µg/day tolerable upper limit of intake, recently established, for Se by the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board.

Restricted access

Abstract  

A study was undertaken to evaluate the short-term changes in the concentration of selenium in whole blood, plasma and erythrocytes following supplementation with low doses of four different selenium supplements. Fourteen volunteers took one of the supplements each day with breakfast for a period of six weeks. Two blood samples were taken each week during this time and selenium was determined on its components using neutron activation analysis via the77mSe isotope.

Restricted access

. Res. 1992 35 299 306 Haraszti, E., Vetter, J.: Selenium content of the home

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Csaba Attila Kósa, Krisztina Nagy, Ottó Szenci, Boglárka Baska-Vincze, Emese Andrásofszky, Róbert Szép, Ágnes Keresztesi, Mircea Mircean, Marian Taulescu, and Orsolya Kutasi

concentration drops below 0.05 ppm ( Uttam et al., 2016 ). All our hay samples originating from the HV areas had selenium levels below our detection limit of 0.05 ppm, while the average selenium content of hay in the VV areas was sufficient but showed high

Open access

Abstract  

A substoichiometric radiochemical method has been developed for the determination of selenium with potassium ethyl xanthate. The selenium ethyl xanthate complex formed was extracted into chloroform from borate buffer at pH 5. The effect of foreign ions on the extraction was studied. Microgram quantities of selenium could be conveniently determined with a fair degree of accuracy. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of selenium content in food stuffs such as Jaggery and Wheat powder.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The selenium content of a variety of food items representing a normal hospital diet has been determined by cyclic instrumental neutron activation analysis (CINAA) through the 162-keV gamma-ray of the77mSe nuclide. The CINAA method is very simple and rapid. It involves irradiation of a sample for 20 s, decay for 20 s, and counting for 20 s. The precision of the method has been significantly improved by recycling the samples up to 4 times. The accuracy has been evaluated by analyzing a number of certified reference materials of varied selenium levels.

Restricted access