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Oregano is used worldwide both as spice and crude drug, which is mainly provided by species of Origanum genus. The quality of the product is usually determined by chemical analysis, whereas in food industrial applications sensory tests are also practised. The aim of the present study was a comparison of parallel quality investigations of oregano samples by a new and effective instrumental sensory evaluation method, the “electronic nose”, and by gas-chromatographic and human sensory analysis. The GC analysis of essential oil components revealed mainly differences between plant species (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum and Origanum majorana). Main components of the oil of the former taxon are carvacrol and thymol, while those of marjoram are terpinene-4-ol, ?-terpinene and terpinolene. A wholesale oregano sample showing considerable divergence from the other ones with respect to ratios of carvacrol, ß-caryophyllene ß-cubebene and thymol. It was assumed not to belong to ssp. hirtum. The electronic nose analysis, evaluated by PCA, proved to be an appropriate, rapid, non-destructive, reagent-less method for the reliable separation of all of the oregano samples based on their complex aroma features. Assumptions could be made about correlations between separation of samples by the instrumental sensors and proportions of terpenoid compounds of the oil established by GC in some cases only. The varying essential oil content of the samples did not influence the success of instrumental evaluation. The instrumental and human sensory analysis showed similar results: varieties of O. majorana could be well distinguished on the basis of their complex aroma, while their gas-chromatograms did not show characteristic differences. The results call the attention that quality evaluation of drug items of aromatic plants should be oriented in different directions, considering the current utilisation area of the items. 

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.) Przemysl Spozywczy 8 14 22 Tilgner, D. J. (1957): Analiza organoleptyczna zywnosci. (Sensory analysis of

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–340. Ladányi M. Biometria agrártudományi alkalmazásokkal 2003 ISO (1994): Sensory

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27 27 37 ISO (1985): Sensory analysis — Methodology — Flavour profile methods . International Organization for Standardization. Geneva, Switzerland

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. Dietetic Assoc. 2002 102 1658 1662 ISO (1988): Sensory analysis — General guidance for the design of test

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boosted up the liking of food samples in terms of its freshness compared to the traditional sensory laboratory. There is a large potential of VR in the development of immersive sensory analysis to be used in investigations of consumer perception and

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. Leclercq , E ( 1992 ): Sesquiterpene lactones and inulin from chicory roots: Extraction, identification, enzymatic release and sensory analysis . PhD. thesis , Landbouwuniversiteit te Wageningen

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cyanidin-3-glucoside (mg mol −1 ) DF: dilution factor ϵ: molar extinction coefficient (26,900 L mol −1 cm −1 ) L: path length (cm) 2.5 Sensory evaluation Sensory analysis was performed by an untrained sensory panel with an average of 32 attendees. The

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: L. Darnay, A. Dankovics, B. Molnár, L. Friedrich, Gy. Kenesei, and Cs. Balla

Several scientific papers suggest that microbial transglutaminase (mTG) is capable of reducing the salt content of cured and/or heat-treated meat products (ham, frankfurters, meat ball). These scientific results are not widely known in Hungary, and as a result of this, only little experience was gathered in our meat industry. According to this lack of knowledge, our aim was to lower the curing salt to a still microbiological safe level using mTG by frankfurters, one of the most well-known heat treated meat products in Hungary. The observed technofunctional properties suggest to use mTG enzyme preparation at 0.5% concentration. This enzyme dosage can reduce the average 1.8% salt content to 1.6% and it also may contribute to extended shelf life of popular frankfurters. Our sensorial analysis revealed that the panellists have not found a loss in quality between 1.4% and 1.6% salt.

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