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Benedek, P. (ed.) (1977): A szennyvíziszap elhelyezése és mezögazdasági hasznosításának feltételei. (Sewage sludge disposal and the conditions for its agricultural use.) Vízügyi Müszaki Gazdasági Tájékoztató , 90 , Vízügyi Dokumentációs és Továbbképzo

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advantages, first, it removes pathogens from organic wastes like in sewage sludges and, second, biochar can improve the structure of soil, increase agricultural output and at the same time contribute to carbon sequestration due to carbon stability of biochar

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Marcelo Mendes Viana, Maura Berger Maltez Melchert, Leandro Cardoso de Morais, Pedro Maurício Buchler, and Jo Dweck

Introduction The requirements of governmental legislation for the disposal and use of sewage sludge coupled with the increase of their generation and decreasing acceptance of traditional routes for their disposal have led to a

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Abstract  

To combust coal together with a small percentage (<10%) of sewage sludge may be an option for the management of these wastes. Combustion of two different sewage sludge, one semianthracite coal and several sludges-coal blends (containing different dried mass% of each of the two sewage sludges) were studied by simultaneous TG/MS dynamic runs carried out at 5C min–1 in the temperature range 100–800C. No interactions have been observed between coal and sludge during the blends combustion. Neither the combustion process, neither the studied emissions have changed appreciably for the mass% of sludge in the blends considered in this work.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Lech Nowicki, Anna Antecka, Tomasz Bedyk, Paweł Stolarek, and Stanisław Ledakowicz

Introduction Sewage sludge is regarded as the residue produced by the wastewater treatment process. Currently the most widely available option of sludge utilization in the EU are according to Fytili and Zabaniotou [ 1 ] the

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Abstract

The pyrolysis of an urban plant sewage sludge carried out under He atmosphere was studied by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometric (TG-MS) and thermogravimetric-gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (TG-GC-MS) analyses. The sludge was thermally degraded with a heating rate of 10°C min−1 in the 20–1000°C interval; its mass loss is 51.8% up to 600°C and 61.4% up to 1000°C. Gas chromatographic analyses of the gas released during major thermogravimetric events allow the identification of various chemical species. Water, carbon mono- and di-oxide, several hydrocarbons (up to C5, both saturated and unsaturated) were the major detected species. Minor amount of pollutant species, such as cyano-compounds, were also detected. Among the released species hydrocarbons constituted the major fraction (53%), thus suggesting their immediate exploitation as fuel gas. The pyrolysis behaviour of this sample was then compared with other sewage sludge arising from wastewater treatment plants subjected to anaerobic digestion as found in literature data.

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uranium. Thus, new sustainable options for the production of phosphate fertilisers must be searched. An alternative source of phosphate is sewage sludge. To protect local receiving waters from eutrophication the phosphorus in waste water is transferred

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Yunbo Zhai, Wenfeng Peng, Guangming Zeng, Zongming Fu, Yuanming Lan, Hongmei Chen, Chang Wang, and Xiaopeng Fan

Introduction Sewage sludge is produced in significant quantities during the industrial and domestic waste water treatment by biological processes and growing sharply in recent years. Consequently, many treatment processes were

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. on Land Application of Sewage Sludge. 259–324. Tokyo. Japan. Csathó P., 1994. A környezet nehézfém-szennyezettsége és az agrártermelés. MTA TAKI. Budapest. Eaton , F. M

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Abstract  

The conventional treatments of effluents containing heavy metals produce significant quantities of byproducts with recalcitrant characteristics, making necessary looking after alternative techniques in order to avoid the production of new contaminated residues. Sorption process of chromium and zinc in vertical columns loaded with sewage sludge and organic solid waste has been studied in this work. The data from the TG curves of the two sorbents presented significant differences when they were submitted to the metal uptake, being noticed the displacement of the thermal events towards lower temperatures for both types of sorbents studied. As it was expected, for both sorbents, an increase in the mass of samples has been observed at the completion of the thermal tests upon metal uptake. Therefore, these facts demonstrate that during the biosorption process a physico-chemical interaction took place between sorbents and metals, as it was evidenced by the more than 100 K increase in the decomposition temperatures as well as the variation of the ΔH values of the samples.

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