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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Olatz Lopez-Fernandez, Niko Männikkö, Maria Kääriäinen, Mark D. Griffiths and Daria J. Kuss

-Fernandez et al., 2017 ). This assesses forbidden, dangerous, and self-perceived smartphone dependence, and was adapted to Finnish from French using the translation–back translation method ( Brislin, 1970 ). The response rate of the PMPUQ-SV was 79.4% in

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Tzu Tsun Luk, Man Ping Wang, Chen Shen, Alice Wan, Pui Hing Chau, John Oliffe, Kasisomayajula Viswanath, Sophia Siu-chee Chan and Tai Hing Lam

-SV as a measuring tool for PSU. Nevertheless, the SAS-SV is among the most widely used and translated instruments assessing smartphone dependence, which can help unify approaches to collecting empirical data to understand and address this rapidly

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Background and aims

Research examining problematic mobile phone use has increased markedly over the past 5 years and has been related to “no mobile phone phobia” (so-called nomophobia). The 20-item Nomophobia Questionnaire (NMP-Q) is the only instrument that assesses nomophobia with an underlying theoretical structure and robust psychometric testing. This study aimed to confirm the construct validity of the Persian NMP-Q using Rasch and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) models.

Methods

After ensuring the linguistic validity, Rasch models were used to examine the unidimensionality of each Persian NMP-Q factor among 3,216 Iranian adolescents and CFAs were used to confirm its four-factor structure. Differential item functioning (DIF) and multigroup CFA were used to examine whether males and females interpreted the NMP-Q similarly, including item content and NMP-Q structure.

Results

Each factor was unidimensional according to the Rach findings, and the four-factor structure was supported by CFA. Two items did not quite fit the Rasch models (Item 14: “I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me;” Item 9: “If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it”). No DIF items were found across gender and measurement invariance was supported in multigroup CFA across gender.

Conclusions

Due to the satisfactory psychometric properties, it is concluded that the Persian NMP-Q can be used to assess nomophobia among adolescents. Moreover, NMP-Q users may compare its scores between genders in the knowledge that there are no score differences contributed by different understandings of NMP-Q items.

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, Moghavvemi, & Paramanathan, 2018 ). By contrast, Bae’s research ( 2017 ) indicated that both information seeking and escapism are associated with heavy smartphone dependence. In a study on the excessive use of general video-streaming services, information

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using the bathroom, and 30% checked it during a meal with others ( Lookout Mobile Security, 2012 ). Such findings suggest that some individuals show signs of smartphone dependence. Negative consequences of smartphone use have been investigated over the

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Haoran Meng, Hongjian Cao, Ruining Hao, Nan Zhou, Yue Liang, Lulu Wu, Lianjiang Jiang, Rongzi Ma, Beilei Li, Linyuan Deng, Zhong Lin, Xiuyun Lin and Jintao Zhang

the type of smartphone use and smartphone dependence of Korean adolescents: National survey study . Children and Youth Services Review , 81 , 207 – 211 . https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.08.012 . 10.1016/j.childyouth.2017

Open access