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Reclaiming the streets — Redefining democracy

The politics of the critical mass bicycle movement in Budapest

Hungarian Studies
Author: Éva Udvarhelyi

2003 Pickvance, K. (2000) ‘The Diversity of Eastern European Social Movements’, in P. Hamel, H. Lustiger-Thale and M. Mayer (eds) Urban Movements in

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Melucci, Alberto (1988) “Social Movements and the Democratization of Everyday Life” in Civil Society and the State , ed. John Keane (London: Verso). Melucci A

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.) Racionálisan l ázadó hallgatók II . Budapest–-Szeged, MTA TK PTI-Belvedere. pp. 118–134. 5 Jenkins, J. C. (1995) Social Movements, Political Representation, and the State: An Agenda

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Baszkföldön a társadalmi mozgalmak új hullámai reneszánszukat élik, egymást érik a tüntetések, lakossági mobilizációk, valamint a nem kevésbé brutális utcai összecsapások. A politikai erőszak és a társadalmi mozgalmak viszonya és rendezése az elmúlt néhány év al_a

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“There are no recipes”

An anthropological assessment of nutrition in Hungarian ecovillages

Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Author: Judit Farkas

’, Memories of the ’Great Famine’ of 1863]. Szolnok Megyei Múzeumi Évkönyv . 91 – 103 . Habermas , Jürgen 1981 New Social Movements . Telos 49 : 33 – 37 . Juhász , Antal – Molnár , Imre 1971 Gyűjtögetés, víziélet . [Gathering, Aquatic

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The contradictory process and the ambivalent result of Jewish assimilation in Hungary between 1867 and 1944 were shaped both by the Neolog-Orthodox duality and the fast acculturation of the Neolog Jewry. The image persistently attached to the Jew in Hungary, the basis of any sort of anti-Semitism, was the denominational bound Jewishness; the identity created and sustained mainly by the urban Neolog Jewish bourgeoisie was, however, definitely Magyar. When image and identity came to be confronted with each other, then political anti-Semitism could get a firm footing; this had happened from just around the late nineteenth and especially the beginning of the twentieth century. Still, there is more than simply a continuity between the form of anti-Semitism characterizing the age of Dualism and the one accompanying the interwar period, when it even became a state policy. The former was rooted in the mental construction of a cultural code, while the latter was most closely associated with the cognitive construction of political code. This also meant that while the former was exclusively carried by some social movements hostile to the issue of Jewish assimilation, the latter led to rigid state discrimination applied against all those the image of whom was identified with Jewishness.

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1987 Joppke, C. (1995) East German Dissidents and the Revolution of 1989: Social Movements in a Leninist Regime (New York: New York University Press

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? Daedalus 1973 102 169 190 Marks, G. — Adam, D. (1996): Social movements and the changing

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. (1999): Lesbian and Gay Rights in Canada: Social Movements and Equality-Seeking, 1971-1995. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Lesbian and Gay Rights in Canada: Social Movements and Equality-Seeking, 1971

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Ökológiai társadalmi mozgalmaink [Our Ecological Social Movements] . Valóság 34 ( 10 ): 34 – 42 . Szirmai , Viktória 1997 Protection of the Environment and the Position of Green Movements in Hungary . In Lánd-Pickvance , Katy – Nick Manning

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