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Abstract

The paper investigates the relations between phonological form and information content within Latin verbal inflection from two interrelated points of view. It looks at conditional entropy relations within the present paradigm to see how these relate to the textual frequency of the individual forms; and it seeks to answer the question to what extent the phonological form of stems and endings has the potential to lead to ambiguity in morphological marking. The latter issue is approached from the angle of the information content that word forms taken in themselves have about their morphological status. The broader question of potential ambiguity is broken down into two separate questions: one concerns stems where intra-paradigmatic ambiguity would be possible; the other concerns stems that include phonological material that could itself be interpreted as a morphological marker. The absence of potential ambiguity in the first sense, and its severe restriction in the second sense is interpreted here as an emergent mechanism to enhance the information content of verb forms.

Open access
Learning & Perception
Authors:
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Tamás M. Bőhm
,
Orsolya Szalárdy
,
Robert Mill
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

Sound sources often emit trains of discrete sounds, such as a series of footsteps. Previously, two different principles have been suggested for how the human auditory system binds discrete sounds together into perceptual units. The feature similarity principle is based on linking sounds with similar characteristics over time. The predictability principle is based on linking sounds that follow each other in a predictable manner. The present study compared the effects of these two principles. Participants were presented with tone sequences and instructed to continuously indicate whether they perceived a single coherent sequence or two concurrent streams of sound. We investigated the influence of separate manipulations of similarity and predictability on these perceptual reports. Both grouping principles affected perception of the tone sequences, albeit with different characteristics. In particular, results suggest that whereas predictability is only analyzed for the currently perceived sound organization, feature similarity is also analyzed for alternative groupings of sound. Moreover, changing similarity or predictability within an ongoing sound sequence led to markedly different dynamic effects. Taken together, these results provide evidence for different roles of similarity and predictability in auditory scene analysis, suggesting that forming auditory stream representations and competition between alternatives rely on partly different processes.

Restricted access
Learning & Perception
Authors:
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Tamás M. Bőhm
,
Orsolya Szalárdy
,
Robert Mill
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

Sound sources often emit trains of discrete sounds, such as a series of footsteps. Previously, two different principles have been suggested for how the human auditory system binds discrete sounds together into perceptual units. The feature similarity principle is based on linking sounds with similar characteristics over time. The predictability principle is based on linking sounds that follow each other in a predictable manner. The present study compared the effects of these two principles. Participants were presented with tone sequences and instructed to continuously indicate whether they perceived a single coherent sequence or two concurrent streams of sound. We investigated the influence of separate manipulations of similarity and predictability on these perceptual reports. Both grouping principles affected perception of the tone sequences, albeit with different characteristics. In particular, results suggest that whereas predictability is only analyzed for the currently perceived sound organization, feature similarity is also analyzed for alternative groupings of sound. Moreover, changing similarity or predictability within an ongoing sound sequence led to markedly different dynamic effects. Taken together, these results provide evidence for different roles of similarity and predictability in auditory scene analysis, suggesting that forming auditory stream representations and competition between alternatives rely on partly different processes.

Restricted access

Origins of sound change: Approaches to phonologization

Alan C. L. Yu (ed.): Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. pp xvi+338

Acta Linguistica Hungarica
Author:
Krisztina Polgárdi

introduction to Element Theory 2011 Blevins, Juliette. 2004. Evolutionary phonology: The emergence of sound patterns. Cambridge

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Blevins, Juliette 2004. Evolutionary phonology: The emergence of sound patterns. Blackwell, Oxford & Malden MA. Evolutionary phonology: The emergence of sound patterns

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80 Lopez, Bárbara Strodt 1979. The sound pattern of Brazilian Portuguese. Doctoral dissertation, UCLA. Mateus, Maria Helena Mira 1975. Aspectos da fonologia

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of Linguistics, Stockholm University). http://www.ling.su.se/fon/fonetik_2004/torstensson_fonetik2004.pdf Vago, Robert M. 1980. The sound pattern of Hungarian. Georgetown University Press, Washington DC

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. Approaches to Hungarian 9: Papers from the Düsseldorf conference 2005 Vago, Robert M. 1980. The sound pattern of Hungarian

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Phonetic Sciences 2007 Vago, Robert M. 1980. The sound pattern of Hungarian. Georgetown University Press, Washington DC

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97 64 130 Vago, Robert M. 1980. The sound pattern of Hungarian. Georgetown University Press, Washington D

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