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Abstract  

Soybean oil based polyols (5-OH polyol, 10-OH polyol and 15-OH polyol) were synthetised from epoxidized soybean oil. The melting peak of polyols and the relationship between melting peak and the number-average functionality of hydroxyl in polyols were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal decomposition of polyols and some of their thermal properties by thermogravimetry (TG) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) were also studied. The thermal stability of polyols in a nitrogen atmosphere was very close hence they had a same baseplate of triglyceride for polyols. The extrapolated onset temperature of polyols in their thermal mass loss, first step had a decreasing order: 5-OH polyol>10-OH polyol>15-OH polyol due to the difficulty in forming multiple elements ring of them had the same order. The thermal behavior of polyols under non-isothermal conditions using Friedman’s differential isoconversional method with different heating rates indicated that the 5-OH polyol had the lowest activation energy in thermal decomposition amongst these polyols according to the same fractional mass loss because of the weakest intramolecular oligomerization. The 15-OH polyol was prior to reach the mass loss region because the six-member ring is more stable than the three-member ring from 10-OH polyol and more easily formed.

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has been implemented by reducing fat content as well as using vegetable oils with high content of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to partially replace animal fat. Several PUFA rich oils, e.g. canola oil ( Alejandre et al., 2019 ) and soybean oil (SBO

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Biodiesels from beef tallow/soybean oil/babassu oil blends

Correlation between fluid dynamic properties and TMDSC data

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: G. A. A. Teixeira, A. S. Maia, I. M. G. Santos, A. L. Souza, A. G. Souza, and N. Queiroz

methanol or ethanol [ 1 – 5 ]. In Brazil, biodiesel is used as a B5 mixture (5 vol.% biodiesel and 95 vol.% conventional diesel), being the soybean oil the main raw material. The continuous rise in the biodiesel percentage added to diesel contributes to the

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: R. Amiri Qandashtant, E. Ataye Salehi, A. Mohamadi Sani, M. Mehraban Sangatash, and O. Safari

concentrations determined in a previous study ( Y oo & K rochta , 2012 ) in 100 ml distilled water at 70 °C. To ensure uniform dispersion, solution was mixed well using magnetic stirrer at 500 r.p.m. for 40 min. Then, soybean oil was added to the solution at 3

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production in Brazil. It is considered as an excellent feedstock considering environmental reasons since it is a residue from the meat processing industry. Nowadays the main source for biodiesel preparation is the soybean oil due to its availability as Brazil

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Abstract  

In the present study, the characteric-structure relationship of epoxidized soybean oils (ESO) with various degrees of epoxidation has been investigated. FTIR analysis was used to identify the relative extent of epoxidation of the samples during the epoxidation reaction. The viscosities of ESO were much higher than that of the raw oil, viscosity increased with degree of epoxidation. The viscous-flow activation energy of ESO was determined to be higher than that of the raw oil (20.72 to 77.93% higher). Thermogravimetry analysis (TG) of ESO was used to investigate the thermodynamic behavior of the samples. With increasing degree of epoxidation, the thermal stability of the samples initially decreased, then increased at the final reacting stage. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) indicated that the melting point of ESO was higher than that of soybean oil. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) indicated the molecular mass of the samples increased initially, then decreased, with an increase in the extent of epoxidation.

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Biodiesel from soybean oil, castor oil and their blends

Oxidative stability by PDSC and rancimat

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: M. B. Dantas, A. R. Albuquerque, L. E. B. Soledade, N. Queiroz, A. S. Maia, I. M. G. Santos, A. L. Souza, E. H. S. Cavalcanti, A. K. Barro, and A. G. Souza

Introduction The use of biodiesel as fuel has become attractive mainly by ecological benefits as it is produced from renewable fonts [ 1 ]. In Brazil, among the raw materials used in the biodiesel obtaining soybean oil [ 2

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: R. Queiroz, Luiza Pires, Ruth de Souza, J. Zamian, A. de Souza, G. da Rocha Filho, and C. da Costa

Abstract  

Hydrotalcite was synthesised by co-precipitation method, calcined and characterized by XRD, BET, IR and TG/DTA/DTG analyses and tested as solid base catalyst in the transesterification of soybean oil with methanol, achieving a methyl ester content of 99.5%. The thermal decomposition of hydrotalcite calcined occurred in four mass loss steps at 28, 105, 203 and 400 °C. The hydrotalcite was recovered and through a simple evaluation by TG/DTA/DTG techniques it was found that at 500 °C is the temperature, where the organic matter should be eliminated from the catalyst. This study shows the importance of thermal analysis in the evaluation of the recovery temperature of hydrotalcite.

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Abstract  

Biodiesel from soybean oil transesterified with methanol (TSO) becomes viscous and gelifies at low storage temperatures which makes it difficult to pump. To inhibit this behaviour bulky esters were added to reduce the crystallization temperature of TSO and to modify the rate of conversion of crystallized mass. This rate was found to follow a JMAK kinetic model. The Avrami’s parameter n was constant for TSO, while two n values were found for TSO-additive solutions, meaning that the additives first slowed down the rate of nucleation and, later on as enough nuclei had been formed, crystal growth rate dominated and the previous crystallization rate was recovered.

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Abstract  

Waterborne polyurethane coatings were prepared by a polyaddition reaction using toluene diisocyanate (TDI), 2,2-di(hydroxy-methyl) propionic acid, soy-based polyols with different hydroxyl values, plus 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) as chain termination agent, triethylamine as neutralization agent, and DBTDL as catalyst. Six soybean oil-based polyols were used in this study with hydroxyl values of 100, 115, 128, 140, 155, and 164 mg KOH g−1, respectively. The molar ratio of polyol hydroxyl to DMPA was varied from 1.6 to 2.6. The storage stability of the waterborne polyurethane coatings was greater than 6 months. The thermal properties of the coating films were investigated by TG and DCS. The results show that the soy-based polyurethane films decomposed in three stages. The glass transition temperatures, T g, of the soy-based polyurethane films increased with the hydroxyl number of the soy-based polyol.

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