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Abstract  

The two step oxidation of UO2+x and reduction of U3O8 powders observed during Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) has been exploited to determine their Specific Surface Areas (SSAs). The results obtained by this method have been compared with the Braunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) method and are found to be in good agreement in the SSA range of 2–4 m2/gm in the case of UO2+x obtained from ADU route and 4–8 m2/gm in the case of AUC route. A precision of ±0.1 m2/gm is obtained. The maximum temperature of oxidation and reduction of these oxides are dependent upon their preparative routes such as Ammonium Diuranate (ADU) and Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC).

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polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons used as starting materials are carcinogens, and boiling in concentrated H 2 SO 4 above 500 K for carbonization is highly dangerous [ 8 ]. The carbon-based solid acid catalysts from carbohydrates with low specific surface area

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Abstract  

A new method of thermal desorption chromatography, in which hydrogen is used as carrier instead of helium, and a water bath instead of an air bath, is presented for determining the specific surface area of uranium compounds. The method proposed has a higher accuracy and a better applicability.

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Abstract  

The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) is considered to be the first step in the combustion of AP-based composite propellants. In this report, the effect of the specific surface area of titanium oxide (TiO2) catalysts on the thermal decomposition characteristics of AP was examined with a series of thermal analysis experiments. It was clear that the thermal decomposition temperature of AP decreased when the specific surface area of TiO2 increased. It was also possible that TiO2 influences the frequency factor of AP decomposition because there was no observable effect on the activation energy.

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Abstract  

The influence of the specific surface area on the crystallization processes of two silica gels with different specific surface areas has been investigated in non-isothermal conditions using DTA technique. The activation energies of the crystallization processes were calculated using four isoconversional methods: Ozawa-Flynn-Wall, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, Starink and Tang. It has been established that, the decrease of the surface area from S=252.62 m2 g−1, in the case of sample GS2, to S=2.52 m2 g−1, in the case of sample GS1, has determined a slight increase of the activation energy of the crystallization process of the gels. Regardless of the isoconversional method used, the activation energy (E α) decreases monotonously with the crystallized fraction (α), which confirms the complex mechanism of gels crystallization. It has been proved that the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model cannot be applied for the crystallization processes of the studied silica gels.

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Abstract  

The interactions of CO with a high specific surface area tin dioxide was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. FTIR study of CO interactions have shown that CO can adsorb on cus (coordinatively unsaturated sites) Sn4+ cation sites (band at 2201 cm-1). In addition, CO reacts with surface oxygen atoms. This leads to the partial reduction of SnO2 surface and to the formation of ionised oxygen vacancies together with the release of free electrons, which are responsible for the loss of transmission. Formed CO2 can chemisorb on specific surface sites: on basic sites to form carbonates species and on acidic sites (Sn4+-CO2 species) which is in competition with the formation of Sn4+-CO species. TG experiment have shown that the reduction of SnO2 by CO at 400°C occurs in two steps. First, the reduction of SnO2 surface, which is a quick phenomenon. This has allowed to evaluate that more than 12% of reducible surface oxygens can react with CO, essentially because of the presence of a large amount of surface hydroxyl groups. The second step of the reduction of SnO2 would be the progressive reduction of SnO2 bulk by the slow diffusion of oxygen atoms from the bulk to the surface.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Lingli Peng, Xiangyu Xu, Zhi Lv, Jiaqing Song, Mingyuan He, Qian Wang, Lijun Yan, Yang Li, and Zhaofei Li

rate at 10 °C/min −1 in N 2 flow (100 mL/min). The specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size were measured using the N 2 sorption method with a Micromeritics ASAP 202 instrument. A GEOL-2100 microscope transmission emission microscopy (TEM

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Yu. Trach, V. Sydorchuk, O. Makota, S. Khalameida, R. Leboda, J. Skubiszewska-Zięba, and V. Zazhigalov

of the HPCs. Therefore, these compounds are perspective oxidation catalysts [ 3 – 5 ]. In other words, HPCs are versatile materials, particularly bifunctional catalysts. However, as a rule, specific surface area of HPCs is very low which

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–desorption isotherms measured at −196 °C for MgB 2 sample. Adsorption capacity, specific surface area, and fractal dimensions were determined from adsorption–desorption isotherms. The results of fractal dimensions of superconductor surface determined on the basis

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