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Anthrone, coumarin and phenazine were studied by combustion calorimetry of small amounts of substance, sublimation calorimetry, neat capacity measurements and differential thermal analysis.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Ricardo Picciochi, Hermínio Diogo, and Manuel Minas da Piedade

Abstract  

Combustion calorimetry, Calvet-drop sublimation calorimetry, and the Knudsen effusion method were used to determine the standard (p o = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of monoclinic (form I) and gaseous paracetamol, at T = 298.15 K:
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{O}}_{ 2} {\text{N}},{\text{ cr I}}} \right) = - ( 4 10.4 \pm 1. 3){\text{ kJ}}\;{\text{mol}}^{ - 1}$$ \end{document}
and
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{O}}_{ 2} {\text{N}},{\text{ g}}} \right) = - ( 2 80.5 \pm 1. 9){\text{ kJ}}\;{\text{mol}}^{ - 1} .$$ \end{document}
From the obtained
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{O}}_{ 2} {\text{N}},{\text{ cr I}}} \right)$$ \end{document}
value and published data, it was also possible to derive the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the two other known polymorphs of paracetamol (forms II and III), at 298.15 K:
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{O}}_{ 2} {\text{N}},{\text{ crII}}} \right) = - ( 40 8.4 \pm 1. 3){\text{ kJ}}\;{\text{mol}}^{ - 1}$$ \end{document}
and
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{O}}_{ 2} {\text{N}},{\text{ crIII}}} \right) = - ( 40 7.4 \pm 1. 3){\text{ kJ}}\;{\text{mol}}^{ - 1} .$$ \end{document}
The proposed
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{O}}_{ 2} {\text{N}},{\text{ g}}} \right)$$ \end{document}
value, together with the experimental enthalpies of formation of acetophenone and 4′-hydroxyacetophenone, taken from the literature, and a re-evaluated enthalpy of formation of acetanilide,
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}} \left( {{\text{C}}_{ 8} {\text{H}}_{ 9} {\text{ON}},{\text{ g}}} \right) = - ( 10 9. 2\,\pm\,2. 2){\text{ kJ}}\;{\text{mol}}^{ - 1} ,$$ \end{document}
were used to assess the predictions of the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ and CBS-QB3 methods for the enthalpy of a isodesmic and isogyric reaction involving those species. This test supported the reliability of the theoretical methods, and indicated a good thermodynamic consistency between the
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}}$$ \end{document}
(C8H9O2N, g) value obtained in this study and the remaining experimental data used in the
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{r}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}}$$ \end{document}
calculation. It also led to the conclusion that the presently recommended enthalpy of formation of gaseous acetanilide in Cox and Pilcher and Pedley’s compilations should be corrected by ~20 kJ mol−1.
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