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Ahlswede, R., Mauduit, C. and Sárközy, A. , Large families of pseudorandom sequences of k symbols and their complexity, Part I, II. , Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4123, General Theory of

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Multi-parameter deformations of the module of symbols of differential operators Internat. Mathem. Research Notices 16 847 – 869 10.1155/S1073792802101127

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Abstract  

In earlier papers C. Mauduit and A. Sárközy have introduced and studied the measures of pseudorandomness for finite binary sequences. In [8] they extend this theory to sequences of k symbols: they give the definitions and also construct a “good” pseudorandom sequence of k symbols. In this paper these measures are studied for a “truely random” sequence.

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The main design strategies of this Chinese project are connection and aesthetic. The new annex building conference and meeting center - presents the new contemporary form and sets up a new relationship with the original stadium surrounding and local traditional culture. The traditional symbol - ‘Lotus Flower’ is used as an effective design imagines, and it was transferred into contemporary form to create the new functional space and attractive volume. This project is a great possibility to explore the methods how traditional and cultural elements can show up in up-to-date way in contemporary architecture.

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Divided into three parts, this article investigates how Johan Huizinga and Walter Benjamin draw upon romantic formulations regarding the difference between symbol and allegory in their respective books on the Middle Ages and the Baroque. The first part of the article offers a close reading of the “Symbolism in its Decline” chapter of Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen (The Autumn of the Middle Ages) (1919) to show how Huizinga sides with Goethe in his preference for symbol over allegory. The second part of the article examines the Ursprung des deutschen Trauerspiels (The Origin of German Tragic Drama) (1928) to decode Walter Benjamin’s account of how “in the wake of Romanticism” a notion of the symbol derived from Classicism was deployed to underwrite a conservative critical practice. The third part pits Benjamin’s allegorical order against Huizinga’s symbolical one and shows that the latter’s humanism provides a less penetrating criticism of modernity as an ongoing process.

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The present study presents a semi-automatic method for parsing and filtering of noun phrases from citation contexts of concept symbols. The purpose of the method is to extract contextual, agreed upon, and pertinent noun phrases, to be used in visualization studies for naming clusters (concept groups) or concept symbols. The method is applied in a case study, which forms part of a larger dissertation work concerning the applicability of bibliometric methods for thesaurus construction. The case study is carried out within periodontology, a specialty area of dentistry. The result of the case study indicates that the method is able to identify highly important noun phrases, and that these phrases accurately describe their parent clusters. Hence, the method is able to reduce the labour intensive work of manual citation context analysis, though further refinements are still needed.

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The idiom of the scales of justiceis commonly known and widely used. Iustitia can frequently be seen in different representations holding scales in her hand. The scales as a means or a symbol of justice (justness) or the administration of justice can be encountered in various places in Greek literature, one of its earliest instances being the Homeric Hermes' Hymn (Dikés talanta). According to these loci Zeus holds the scales of Diké, that is to say, the scales of justice in his hand. In the Iliad (23, 109-213) one may come across a scene presented in context, thus suitable for being more amply analysed, in which Zeus is pronouncing justice over the heroes using a pair of scales. In search of the meaning of Dikés talanta, this study tries to clarify the concept of law and justice (justness) in Homeric epic (I.), then by a structural (II.) and comparative analysis (III.) of certain lines of the weighing scene, decisive in the combat of Achilles and Hector, it formulates a few remarks on the origin and meaning of the concept of the scales of justice. One cannot claim that this idea of Egyptian religion had been transferred in its entirety into Greek thinking, but it is not surprising, as one can barely encounter an unaltered Egyptian borrowing in Greek mythological thinking. Nonetheless, some Egyptian influence, possibly with Cretan transmission, can be detected in the development of the Greek versions of psykhostasia and kerostasia. Pictorial as well as textual manifestations of such influence can be found on the one hand in vase-paintings, and on the other hand-undergoing a specific alteration of aspect in the form of kerostasia-in Homer, who paved the way for the scales of justice of Zeus and Iuppiter to become the symbol of Diké and Iustitia, and subsequently of the administration of justice itself.

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Budaörs Airport is a work of modern architecture built in 1937 in a country that was fundamentally conservative in its political outlook, and was the first public airport in Hungary that met European standards. It was designed by the architects Virgil Bierbauer and László Králik. The airport architecture made use of the lessons learned, both positive and negative, from countless airports in other countries. In this regard it successfully overcame the technical and other problems faced by designers in European countries, which had made it necessary to redesign the airports in these countries in the midthirties. The building was simultaneously modern and pragmatic. Its overhead view, with the side wings attached to the circular passenger hall, clearly shows the purpose of the building. Budaörs Airport was built as a transit airport: it was intended to have an important geopolitical role in connecting air passengers from Central Europe with other countries and continents in the world. In the 1920s, countless airports had been constructed in Europe to deal with air traffic between the different countries and between Europe and their colonies. Hungary, however, had long been excluded from this development, due to the terms of the peace treaties that concluded the First World War. It was not until the mid-1930s that the country had the chance to break free from these restrictions. Budaörs Airport became a symbol both of this newfound liberty and of the start of modern civil aviation, while its creation was also closely linked to the changing lifestyle of the 1920s and 1930s.

The interior of the airport was also designed to meet the expectations of the modern human with an interest in all the new things of the world. The interior decoration of the passenger hall was quite innovative: bearing in mind the philosophical background underlying modern movements in art, it combined the compositional approach of painting (aeropittura, Expressionism) with the techniques of photomontage and murals. This composition, known by the title of “The Experience of Flight,” aimed to fill the room with a vision of flight, based partly on realistic and partly on imaginary images, to inspire passengers arriving in the passenger hall, as well as whoever accompanied them. Running all the way around the upstairs balustrade, the enormous photomontage – photofrieze, photomural – was the result of collaboration between the architect Virgil Bierbauer and the painter and photographer Ada Ackermann (Mrs Elemér Marsovszky), and was made using aerial photographs from Hungary and Europe.

By presenting Budaörs Airport in detail, this study is intended as a contribution to investigations into the unique modern architectural world of airport architecture and to the evaluation of the decorative and propagandistic role played by photography.

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Ahlswede, Khachatrian, Mauduit and A. Sárközy introduced the notion of family-complexity of families of binary sequences. They estimated the family-complexity of a large family related to Legendre symbol introduced by Goubin, Mauduit and Sárközy. Here their result is improved, and apart from the constant factor the best lower bound is given for the family-complexity.

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One of the most important moments in the Isiac and Mithraic mysteries is certainly that which involves the ritual presentation to the initiates of a symbol which served to explain the essence of the divinity. For the Isiac cult, we have the benefit of the famous Herculanum fresco where a priest is shown presenting, in a very ritual context, a sacred urn, doubtless containing Nile water, the very symbol of Isis. As for the Mithraic cult, we have a by no means less famous source: the text of St. Justin the Martyr which indicates that holy water and bread were shown. Our paper will analyse these two vital source documents and seek to establish, in so far as is possible, the theological content of these acts, as much by reference to the highest degree of initiation into the Mysteries of Eleusis as by consideration of the offering of bread and wine in the Christian eucharist.

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