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Among Franz Liszt’s symphonic poems, Hunnenschlacht (“The Battle of the Huns,” 1857) and Von der Wiege bis zum Grabe (“From the Cradle to the Grave,” 1883) were inspired by the visual arts. With these works, Liszt attempted to translate painterly figurations into music; this intention is particularly embodied in his symphonic transformation of Wilhelm Kaulbach’s monumental fresco, Hunnenschlacht. Liszt was attracted by the idea of religious devotion and at the same time identified himself with the Huns. This paper considers the ways in which Liszt expressed the narrative plot and imitated the visual qualities of the Hunnenschlacht fresco by deploying innovative instrumental techniques and a progressive formal structure. This work illustrates Liszt’s interest in combining different art forms, and the prominent use of an apotheosis is an expression of the Beethovenian symphonic model. Liszt shared with early-nineteenth-century Romantics such as E. T. A. Hoffmann an interest in synaesthesia, associating colors with sounds. In Hunnenschlacht, he used the graphic illustration of the fresco as his primary source, yet he also attempted to convey the various tone colors associated with the figures. This interpretative process is explained in his preface to the score, in which Liszt describes the lights and colors associated with the Huns, the Romans, and the Cross. The peculiar treatment of instrumentation, including the use of wooden and sponge drum sticks, organ, unusual combinations of instruments, and an audacious treatment of dynamics, vibrantly depict the distinct colors or lights that envelop the principal figures in the painting.

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The article focuses on Ligeti’s synaesthesia: after referring to some early ‘synaesthetic’ compositions often mentioned by the composer, the phenomenon of synaesthesia in general is examined. It turns out that Ligeti’s fondness of synaesthesia has to be seen in relation to his ‘postmodern’ emphasis on spatiality in music – and thereby with his attempts to overcome transitoriness and death.

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-Hearing Synesthesia. In: Cross-Modal Translations of Sensory Dimensions. Psychological Bulletin 82 (1975): 303–331. Marks L. E. On Colored-Hearing Synesthesia

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Nikolić, D. (2009): Synaesthesia Actually Ideaestesia? An Inquiry into the Nature of the Phenomenon. Proceedings of the Third International Congress on Synaesthesia, Science & Art . Granada, Spain, April 26

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—730. Ramachandran, V.S., & Hirstein, W. (1998). The perception of phantom limbs. The DO Hebb lecture. Brain , 121 (9), 1603—1630. Ramachandran, V.S., & Rogers-Ramachandran, D. (1996). Synaesthesia in phantom limbs induced with mirrors

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), 217 – 234 . S ITTON , S. C. , & P IERCE , E. R. ( 2004 ). Synesthesia, creativity and puns . Psychological Reports , 95 ( 2 ), 577 – 580

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Perception in three different contexts, namely, those related to the phenomenon of hallucination, the sense of space, and the phenomenon of synesthesia. To our mind, the French philosopher, by labeling it as psychotic hallucination, fundamentally

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Journal of Psychedelic Studies
Authors: André Sevenius Nilsen, Bjørn Erik Juel, Nadine Farnes, Luis Romundstad, and Johan Frederik Storm

/kg/h; Schwenk et al., 2018 ), the drug can produce profound effects on subjective experience such as disembodiment, hallucinations, and synesthesia (e.g. Krystal et al., 1994 ; Morgan, Mofeez, Brandner, Bromley, & Curran, 2004 ), and has for this reason been

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created more abstract works. The latter drawings are the closest to synaesthesia as sounds inspired colours and visions. We have been astonished by the dynamism of the scenes, the proportionate use of space, the strong and well-defined contours, the unique

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phenomena. One is a fire that burns upon objects but does not consume them (Exodus 24:17), which he interprets as a visual metaphor for the brilliant patterns that blaze around objects in psychedelic states. The other is synesthesia or the mixing of sense

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