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Some Portuguese verbs have two different past participles, such as, e.g., aceitar ‘accept’, with participles aceitado and aceito ; and limpar ‘clean’, with limpado and limpo . The first one in each pair mentioned is thematic, whereas the second one is athematic. While regular thematic participles all bear stress on the theme vowel, these athematic participles all bear the primary stress on the athematic stem. As the morphosyntactic category first person singular present indicative (1spi) is realized by {-o}, it normally coincides the masculine form of this athematic participle, giving rise to a syncretism between 1spi and the participle. The aim of this paper is to track the appearance of this kind of participle and the resulting syncretism in Portuguese and the changes making it possible for new participles to be formed in this way in colloquial Brazilian Portuguese.

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Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors:
Jan Don
,
Fenna Bergsma
,
Anne Merkuur
, and
Meg Smith

. Consider the singular second person past tense forms in (1). Here, we see that there is a syncretism between first and third person to the exclusion of the second. This is an instantiation of a so-called ABA-pattern given the hierarchy in (2). Because such

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The central effect of globalization is cultural convergence. The notion of “cultural creolization,” amplified from creole linguistics, offers a model wherewith to understand the cultural convergences of Europe and the rest of the postmodern world. Creolization, like diaspora, is a word with a history that is relevant to cultural analysis. Despite the claims of other terms like acculturation, transculturation, mixing, and hybridization, I advocate creolization to remind ethnologists of the decisive power differences that are always present when cultures converge. Creolization also denotes the creation of something discontinuous and new, which could not have been predicted from its origins. I sketch the relation of this concept to history, sociolinguistics, communication theory, anthropology, and religious studies, in the light of definitive linguistic research.

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Recent research has increasingly questioned the “grand dichotomy” between “Paganism” and Christianity and brings into light the prominence of spaces with shared meanings in diverse cults related to mystic beliefs and practices. An excellent example is Vibia's tomb within Praetextatus' catacomb, on the Via Appia. Dated to the 4th century AD, this place combines epigraphy and a fascinating iconography pointing to a mystic initiation of the deceased within a syncretic context.

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syncretism between the first person and third person singular is maintained in the subjunctive tenses and in the relative indicative tenses (e.g., 1 sg/ 3 sg.ipfv.ind bevia ‘I/he/she drank’, 1 sg/ 3 sg.ipfv.sbjv begués ‘I/he/she drank’), that is, in

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In this article an offering text written in Tibetan by Mongolian monks will be presented. The Tibetan text is given in Latin transcription accompanied by an English translation and a few preliminary notes. This Buddhist text was dedicated to Dayan Degereki, a Mongolian deity, who appears, due to religious syncretism, once as a fertility god and a guarding spirit of the shamanic initiations, once as a protector deity of the Buddhist law. This text forms the backbone of my PhD dissertation to be submitted soon, which will offer an analysis of the present text in a wider context of religious syncretism.

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It is possible to identify three dominant inflectional paradigms of the noun in singular which are in principle implied by the grammatical gender: masculine, feminine, and neuter. Only masculine nouns ending in -a follow the same inflectional pattern as feminine nouns. Neuter nouns exhibit numerous common features with the masculine inflection. In plural, due to the neutralisation of grammatical oppositions and syncretism of inflectional forms, the majority of nouns are inflected according to one paradigm. Only masculine nouns with personal reference obtain in nominative and accusative endings different than those of the remaining nouns, which is also stressed by the formal exponents of their attributes.

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Ancient Times and Their Many Stories. Russian Apocrypha and Religious Folk Songs at the Intersection of Ancient Cultures.The Kiev-centred Old Russian State converted to Christianity in 988–989. The conversion of eastern Slavs did not happen in a moment however; rather it took place gradually and was the effect of a long and complex process of development. Christianity started to take root in Kiev Rus well before the 10th century. It is known that at the beginning of his reign Prince Vladimir Sviatoslavich I was dedicated to Pagan creed and even tried reforming it in order to consolidate the unity of his state. Christianization, the so called ’state christening’ was confined to towns first, as testified in a 11th century report by Ilarion, the first Russian speaking Metropolitan of Kiev:’ The sound of the apostolic trumpet and the Gospel filled all the towns…’ The population of villages became intrinsically and spiritually truly Christian only later, in the 15th-17th centuries. The Pagan-Christian religious syncretism of the period is often called’ double faith’, which is not the best term to describe a spirit and consciousness in the process of Christianization. In the name of its elastic mission strategy the clergy had significant initiatives contributing to Pagan-Christian syncretism. This unique consciousness and spirituality created its own ideal of beauty and determined the characteristic features of the culture of Russia before the Mongol invasion.

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«Апостольскаа труба и евангельскый громъ вся грады огласи…»

Главные вопросы принятия на Руси христианства и эпохи православно-языческого религиозного синкретизма

Studia Slavica
Author:
Дьёрдь Орос

The Kiev-centred Old Russian State converted to Christianity in 988–989. The conversion of eastern Slavs did not happen in a moment however; rather it took place gradually and was the effect of a long and complex process of development. Christianity started to take root in Kievian Rus’ well before the 10th century. It is known that at the beginning of his reign Prince Vladimir Sviatoslavich I was dedicated to Pagan creed and even tried reforming it in order to consolidate the unity of his state. Christianization, the so-called ‘state christening’ was confined to towns first, as testified in a 11th-century report by Ilarion, the first Russian-speaking metropolitan of Kiev: ‘The sound of the apostolic trumpet and the Gospel filled all the towns…’ The population of villages became intrinsically and spiritually truly Christian only later, in the 15th–17th centuries. The Pagan–Christian religious syncretism of the period is often called ‘double faith’, which is not the best term to describe a spirit and consciousness in the process of Christianization. In the name of its elastic mission strategy the clergy had significant initiatives contributing to Pagan Christian syncretism. This unique consciousness and spirituality created its own ideal of beauty and determined the characteristic features of the culture of Russia before the Mongol invasion.

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Current results in both theoretical and fieldwork in shamanism in Korea are getting closer to the unity about origins and state of kangshinmu and sesŭmmu, the two types of mudang. Our aim is to specify the differences based on the latest research results and to show the development of overlapping between them through the changing process of their position in today society. We emphasize the characteristics of the sesŭmmu which is disappearing or melting into a modern mixed mudang form. From a historical perspective differentiation could have evolved because of a kind of syncretism as a consequence of the different cultural traditions’ meeting thus modern situation can be seen as the sequence of historical process.

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