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. McIlwraith 1998 “I'm addicted to television”: The personality, imagination, and TV watching patterns of self-identified TV addicts Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media

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van de Poel, M. & D'Ydewalle, G. 2001. Incidental Foreign-language Acquisition by Children Watching Subtitled Television Programs. In: Gambier, Y. & Gottlieb, H. (eds.) 259

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: István Tóth-Király, Beáta Bőthe, Eszter Tóth-Fáber, Győző Hága and Gábor Orosz

Introduction Television watching is one of the most dominant leisure time activities in the world. According to the 2014 American Time Use Survey ( US Department of Labor, 2015 ), the average time spent watching television was

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Kanazawa (2004a) proposes that the human brain may have difficulty comprehending entities and situations that did not exist in the ancestral environment, and, as one empirical demonstration of this Savanna Principle, Kanazawa (2002) shows that people who watch certain types of TV shows are more satisfied with their friendships, suggesting that they may have difficulty distinguishing TV characters from real friends. In an entirely different line of research, Kanazawa (2004b) advances an evolutionary psychological theory of the evolution of general intelligence, which proposes that general intelligence evolved in order to handle evolutionarily-novel problems. The logical convergence of these two separate lines of research leads to the prediction that the human difficulty in dealing with evolutionarily-novel stimuli interacts with general intelligence, such that the Savanna Principle holds stronger among the less intelligent than among the more intelligent. Further analyses of the U.S. General Social Survey demonstrate that less intelligent men and women may have greater difficulty separating TV characters from their real friends than more intelligent men and women.

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Introduction Trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection (STI), with an estimated 142.6 million new cases globally in 2012 [ 1 , 2 ]. Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) primarily infects the squamous

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6 273 290 Goodwin, A. and Whannel, G. (1990): Understanding Television. London: Routledge

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The investigation of the coupling between building and ground motions is of great importance because the results contribute to the planning of stable, motionproof constructions and to forecast of damages. For monitoring ground and building motions the TV tower in Sopron, Hungary was chosen. Two borehole tiltmeters, Applied Geomechanics Inc., model 722A were used for continuous and short-term high frequency tilt measurements. One of the instruments was installed on the concrete basement of the TV tower and the other in a borehole drilled at a distance of about 90 m beside the tower. This paper presents continuous data series of a length of more than one year, high frequency tilt measurements with sampling rates of up to 10 Hz and discusses the first experiences of the observations.

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Christian Nyemcsok, Samantha L. Thomas, Amy Bestman, Hannah Pitt, Mike Daube and Rebecca Cassidy

Communication and Media Authority . ( 2015 ). Commercial television code of practice . Retrieved from http://www.acma.gov.au/Industry/Broadcast/Television/TV-content-regulation/commercial-television-code-of-practice-tv

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Perspectives Gottlieb, H. 1997. Quality Revisited: the Rendering of English Idioms in Danish Television Subtitles vs. Printed Translations. In: Trosborg, A. (ed.). Text Typology and

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