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Fényes 1851 = Fényes Elek: Magyarország geographiai szótára I. Pest, 1851. Kocsis 1999–2001 = The Szeged Minea. A Cyrillic Manuscript from the Late 16th Century . A text edition by Mihály Kocsis

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Abstract

The present paper aims at giving a text edition of Antonio Cassarino's humanist Latin translation of Plutarch's dialogue Bruta animalia ratione uti. This is the earliest of three translations made of this dialogue in the course of the 15th century. The text itself is extant in three different manuscripts, one of which is a codex of the Vatican Library (Vat. lat. 3349), compiled after Cassarino's death by Panormita. A comparison of the text variants has led to several results. First, some of the errors shared by all three manuscripts show that they go back to a common archetype already at some distance from the translator's original copy. Second, Panormita relied heavily on a codex of the Biblioteca della Società Siciliana per la Storia Patria in Palermo (MS Lodi XII E 13) in preparing his own version. Third, the Vatican codex is far from being the best representative of Cassarino's original translation. Though Panormita corrected several of the common inherited errors, he made changes to the text without consulting the Greek. In almost every instance, it is a codex of the Biblioteca Casanatense of Rome (Bibl. Casan. 665 C II 8) which gives the best reading, providing the clue for a successful reconstruction of the text. An attempt will be made to trace the version contained in this codex back to a certain person named Balbi, referred to in the dedicatory letter as being a learned expert of both languages, Greek and Latin. Along with the establishment of the text, it will also be possible to define the original Greek source codex Cassarino used for his translation (Vat. Pal. gr. 170).

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One of the most famous works of literature written in Latin in Hungary is the the mirror for princes attributed to Saint Stephen, founder of the Hungarian state, which, therefore, enjoys high respect in the Catholic Church. However, as all the manuscripts in which the text survives go back to the 15th and 16th century, there has arisen the suspicion of forgery. This supposition is not adequate, because legends of Saint Stephen of the 11th–12th centuries give an exact description of the work. Saint Stephen presented his admonitions to his son at a moment when, after the death of Henry (Heinrich) II, Stephen’s son Emeric, as the closest relative, was being considered a suitable candidate for emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Later the text of the Admonitions , as a rule, came to be handed down with that of Stephen’s “Laws”, which generally meant that there emerged two versions of the text, both being of approximately the same value. The correct original text can probably be reconstructed through their collation.

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Eustathios, the illustrious scholar and clergyman of the 12th century AD, wrote a commentary to Pindar’s epinician odes, from which only the proem survives. Eustathios treatment of the lyric poet, his ideas and criteria of literary criticism have not been re-assessed since Kambylis’ interpretation and text edition (1991). The aim of this paper is to supply this re-evaluation. Besides, a new Homeric allusion and some evidence for Eustathios’ productive imitation of Pindar’s style are dealt with.

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Taddeo Ugoleto, Mátyás könyvtárosa korának elismert humanista tudósa volt. Magyarországi tartózkodása után több latin irodalmi mű editio princepsét is sajtó alá rendezte, többek között Quintilianus, Augustinus, Ausonius és Claudianus egyes írásait. Szövegkiadói munkájával párhuzamosan készített tanulmányai azonban nem maradtak ránk. Emiatt különösen értékesek azok a bejegyzések, elsősorban pótlólagos címszók és magyarázatok, amelyeket Johannes Crastonus 1483. november 10-én Vicenzában megjelent, jelenleg Bécsben őrzött (ÖNB Ink. X. E. 9.) görög–latin szótárának egyik példányába írt bele, néhány évvel azt követően, hogy megkezdte Corvin János nevelését. A kutatásban eddig figyelmen kívül hagyott bejegyzések alapján nemcsak Ugoleto görögös műveltségére és olvasmányaira lehet következtetni, hanem új adatok nyerhetők a Királyi Könyvtár görög nyelvű könyvállományával kapcsolatban is.

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ortodoxia története Magyarországon a XVIII. századig . Szeged, 1995. 77–83. Кочиш 1999–2001 = The Szeged Minea . A Cyrillic Manuscript from the Late 16th Century . A text edition by Mihály Kocsis. (Bibliotheca Slavica Savariensis

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2008 = Tönnies Fenne’s Low German Manual of Spoken Russian. Pskov, 1607. An electronic text edition. Version 1.1. Edited by Pepijn Hendriks and Jos Schaeken. Leiden, 2008. Храмов 2011 = Храмов Ю. В. К этимологии балто

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(szerk.): Bevezetés az orosz nyelvtudomány tanulmányozásába . Budapest, 1982. 197–209. Kocsis 1999–2001 = The Szeged Minea . A Cyrillic Manuscript from the Late 16th Century . A text edition by Mihály Kocsis. (Bibliotheca

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Chalcocondyles Latinus •

Konrad Clauser's translation of Chalkokondyles

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author:
Tamás Mészáros

, on the recommendation of Hieronymus Wolf, that he became personally acquainted with Johannes Oporinus, who later published Clauser's translation. Several of Xylander's text editions were also published with the collaboration of Oporinus's press, and

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) , 1051–1099; Hardie (2019) . 4 The appreciation and rebirth of early Christian Latin poetry during late humanism is clearly demonstrated by the large number of related text editions of the time. Czapla in the impressive list of sources offered in his

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