Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • "textual tradition" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Abstract

This paper deals with the textual tradition of the Florilegium Vindobonense (14th century). According to the current state of research, only one manuscript of this alphabetical anthology is known, which can be found in Codex Philologicus Graecus 169 (Austrian National Library). In preparing the text for edition, however, I found another manuscript that contains the anthology in its entirety. Codex Vaticanus Graecus 895 also dates from the beginning of the 14th century. This article examines the relationship between the two text variants in light of the provenience of the manuscripts and textual criticism.

Open access

One of the most famous works of literature written in Latin in Hungary is the the mirror for princes attributed to Saint Stephen, founder of the Hungarian state, which, therefore, enjoys high respect in the Catholic Church. However, as all the manuscripts in which the text survives go back to the 15th and 16th century, there has arisen the suspicion of forgery. This supposition is not adequate, because legends of Saint Stephen of the 11th–12th centuries give an exact description of the work. Saint Stephen presented his admonitions to his son at a moment when, after the death of Henry (Heinrich) II, Stephen’s son Emeric, as the closest relative, was being considered a suitable candidate for emperor of the Holy Roman Empire. Later the text of the Admonitions , as a rule, came to be handed down with that of Stephen’s “Laws”, which generally meant that there emerged two versions of the text, both being of approximately the same value. The correct original text can probably be reconstructed through their collation.

Restricted access

Chalcocondyles Latinus •

Konrad Clauser's translation of Chalkokondyles

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author:
Tamás Mészáros

Abstract

Zurich scholar Konrad Clauser's translation of Chalkokondyles was printed in 1556 at Oporinus' publishing house in Basel. The present paper reconstructs the circumstances of the formation of that translation, provides a detailed account of the publication, attempts to establish which manuscript may have served as the basis for the translation, and presents an outline of the immediate reception of the translation.

Open access

A következő elemzést az a megfigyelés indokolja, hogy Kallimachos Zeus-himnuszának epilógusa (h. 1. 91 sk.) utal az archaikus költő-filozófus Xenophanés egyik töredékére (fr. 34. 1 sk.). Hogy ez eleddig senkinek sem tűnt fel, annak tudható be, hogy Xenophanés töredékét több szerző idézi különféle változatban, Kallimachos pedig nem arra a szövegre utal, amelyik ma elfogadottnak tekinthető, hanem arra, melyet Plutarchos (de aud. poet. 2. 17 E) őrzött meg nekünk. Ez az észrevétel vezet tovább az allúzió szerepének vizsgálatához, amelyben a vendégszöveg a himnikus formakinccsel ötvöződik.

Restricted access

The name and the verses of Phaedrus were unknown in the Middle Ages but his fables were widespread in several prosified versions. One of these is the collection of Romulus, which is of great importance because it has preserved some lost Phaedrian fables and various other collections have derived from it. This paper examines the textual tradition of these and of Phaedrus’ fables. I attempt to present some problems about the tradition and offer a solution to these questions.

Restricted access

This paper introduces three Mongolian texts of various genres linked together by their frame narratives which all refer to Mongolian notions regarding the Chinese origin of divination, geomancy and related rituals. The frame narratives represent a rare component of Mongolian texts of these genres. The texts are published in transcription, with a translation, and compared to the corresponding textual tradition as well as to wider cultural context illustrated by instances from oral tradition.

Restricted access

A tanulmány Hypereidés Démosthenés ellen című beszédének szöveghagyományát tekinti át a Har- ris-Arden papirusztekercs töredékcsoportjainak bemutatásával. Gianfranco Bartolini fél évszázaddal korábban publikált átfogó elemzését egészíti ki az 1972 óta megismert adatokkal. Az előkészületben lévő Hypereidés-szövegkiadás (Bibliotheca Teubneriana) előszavának egyik, bővített fejezetét jelenti.

This paper reviews the textual tradition of Hyperides’ speech Against Demosthenes by presenting fragment groups of the Harris-Arden papyrus scroll. It complements Gianfranco Bartolini’s comprehensive analysis published half a century ago with data acquired since 1972. It constitutes an extended chapter of the preface to the forthcoming Hyperides edition (Bibliotheca Teubneriana).

Open access

This article is dedicated to a short treatise, located within the corpus of bucolic authors’ scholia, that shows a textual tradition different from the one transmitted by the other known sources and references of bucolic poetry tradition related to the works of Theocritus, Bion and Moscos. Edition and analysis of the work was carried out and organized so to suggest an interpretation of each text, discussing the figure of the author, tentatively identified with Theon Grammaticus, son of Artemidorus. Aim of the work is to reconsider a critical text possibly transmitted in fragmentary form, of which a reconstruction could be attempted.

Restricted access

The description of the plough in the Kṛṣiparāśara has been a puzzle for generations of Sanskrit philologists. What especially pained me was the disfunctional character of this description: among the eight essential parts the ploughshare was missing. The turning up of an until now unknown manuscript from The Library of Congress has brought a basic change: it contains the expected reading phālikā “ploughshare” for pāśikā an otherwise meaningful term “rope” that could have been adjusted to the context only by rather strained explanations.The present paper throws light on the problems concerned in the textual tradition and offers a solution.

Restricted access

A XV. század közepe táján a kereszténység előtti kultúrák iránti érdeklődés megnövekedésével egyidejűleg emelkedni kezdett a görögül tanulni vágyók száma is Európa latin nyelvű felében. Ezzel párhuzamosan megnőtt az igény a különféle nyelvtanulási segédletek, így a görög–latin szótárak iránt is. Kétnyelvű szótárra többféleképpen lehetett ekkoriban szert tenni, az egyik lehetőséget egy ókori bilinguis szótár, az ún. Pseudo-Kyrillos jelentette. A Pseudo-Kyrillos a magyar kutatás érdeklődését is felkeltette az utóbbi évtizedekben, főként azért, mert egyik példányát Janus Pannonius is beszerezte magának. Az alábbi tanulmány nem ezzel a példánnyal kíván foglalkozni, hanem egy másikkal, amelyet egy bizonyos Benedictus másolt. A szerző arra tesz kísérletet, hogy azonosítsa az illető személyét, nyomon kövesse a példány keletkezésének történetét, valamint feltérképezze a Pseudo-Kyrillos szöveghagyományozódásának egyik ágát.

Restricted access