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The paper bellow aims at presenting and discussing Father Pavel Florensky's  Sophiology on the basis of his theodicy concentrated in his doctorial dissertation published in 1914 which contains scrupulously detailed argumentations. Summarising his views concerning a positive approach to the utmost essential function and mission of philosophy, i.e. revealing the Higher Truth, Florensky points out his belief that it unquestionably belongs to the sphere of the Transcendent. Truth, which thus is knowledgeable exclusively via scrutinising the nature of the Holy Spirit (here Florensky intensely disputes Kantian agnosticism), is consequently to be observed as the indivisible single whole. The author attempts to systematise the ancient tradition of Sophia, which has been existent in a latent fashion in Russian mentality, by throwing some light upon both its roots to be traced back in the Old Testament and in patristics, and in Russian iconography. Florensky's work, whose unique impact on turn-of-the-century Russian Symbolist circles (Belyj and Blok) is not to be ignored, offers an insight into the theoretical background of Russian Sophiology. Following in the footsteps of Vl. Solovyev and referring to the Fathers of Church, Florensky considers it completely feasible to link Sophiology to living Christian theology and practice, offering denials against accusations of heresy. Utilising abundant interdisciplinary methods in his argumentation Florensky emphasises strife upon behalf of the self oriented towards the principle of self-perfection-a main trend also prophesied by his contemporary N. Berdjaev. Concepts of memory, dichotomies of darkness and light are given detailed discussion, from which, in harmony with Florensky's teachings, follows the transition from the empirical state of time and space to the higher realm of the Absolute. In this process dualism may be conquered by the interfering principle of the Holy Sophia (this interpretation modifies scanty clues found in Solovyev's oeuvre), who represents the principle of Unification. A novel differentiation provides distinction between Western Philosophy and Russian Sophiology by marking the historically corrupt Sophia in the former.

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The main religious layleader of the Hungarian Calvinists living in Carpathian Ukraine was the peasant-prophetess, Mrs.Mariska Borku (1910 –1978). Her higly important work, the socalled „Third Testament ” is a manuscript, written under the influence of the Holy Spirit. It was considered by Mrs. Mariska Borku and her followers as a holy text, a part of the Bible.

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Summary

1. History of bronze casting in Zipser Neudorf (Spišská Nová Ves) on the basis of the baptismal fonts in comparison with bells. The main periods are: the second half of the 14th century – Master Matthias (about 1427 – after 1440), the mid 15th century – the late works under Johannes Wagner (end of 15th century – 1513). 2. Two sporadic works, the baptismal fonts of Durlsdorf and Altwalddorf. 3. The attribution of the Bartfeld baptismal font to the Cracow master Hannus Frewdental whose signed and dated (1420) baptismal font stands in the Church of the Holy Spirit in Cracow.

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The author tries to clarify the authentic human anthropology of St. Thomas, considering the "per excessum" interpretation of Hume and the "per defectum" valuation of the human emotions in stoicism. Thomas was referred to as "Doctor Angelicus" but he is also "Doctor Humanus". He applies the requirements of "recta ratio" and "virtus in medio" with respect to the role of human emotions, too. To the efficacy of "habitus operativus" he accepts the helping role of "disposition" as a type of inspiration. In this conception, "habitus entitativus", as the general state of health, is connected with the emotional forces of the soul, i.e. with the "passiones". The theological aspect of the feelings can be considered especially in relation to the inspirations of the Holy Spirit. This is the teaching of Sigmund Freud, too, but his "Libido" cannot obtain the joy of soul. The spiritual joy is the result of real happiness, or as Thomas puts it, "delectatio consequtur beatitudinem".

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In the late 1930s several “peasant ecclesiola” formed around two Calvinist peasant prophetesses in Sub-Carpathia, a region that came under fi rst Czechoslovak, then successively Hungarian, Ukrainian and Soviet rule as a consequence of the Trianon peace dictate. One group functioned between 1937–1977 under the leadership of Mariska Borku (Tiszaágtelek, 1910–1978). Over a period of 40 years Mariska Borku wrote the “Words”, under the inspiration of Jesus Christ or the Holy Spirit. Her manuscript called the Lettszövetség (Third Testament) was regarded by the prophetess and her followers as sacred and seen as a continuation of the Bible. They disseminated it in handwritten copies and used it in religious services held in homes and for private devotions.The other prophetess, Borbála Szanyi Mikó (Nagydobrony, 1897–1950) organised a smaller, closed prayer group around herself, composed mainly of relatives. She too wrote down the “Words” she received in visions, in her Örökkévaló Evangélium (Eternal Gospel).

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„Elle n'a point eu à subir […] la pourriture, les vers et la poussière…“

Remarques sur l'iconographie de la mort de Marie ŕ propos du triptyque d'Esztergom réalisé sous l'influ-ence du Maître du Retable du roi Albert

Acta Historiae Artium Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Anna Eörsi

Summary

During the XVth Century one seldom finds a representation of the Death of the Virgin as the central theme of a tryptich. The Holy Spirit floating over the globe is as unusual for the iconography of this theme, as are the diabolic beasts abounding in the ground. The latter, just as the fly and the spider on the bedside are meant as symbols of sin. The decoration of the deathbed of Mary is reminiscent of the representations of the Arc of the Covenant. The commission of the tryptich is to be seen in the context of contemporary discussions over the Immaculate Conception. However, it is not anymore possible for us to decide which side's arguments were meant to be supported by this painting. The apostle lifting up a censer belongs to the same Rahmenthemen as the doctor lifting up the uroscope.

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Solovyov's sophiological teaching had a significant influence on the development of Russian philosophy of religion. He contributed a new discovery to the science of sophiology: he threw light on the complicated relationship between the idea of unity originating from God and uniting the whole world, and between the methaphysics of Sophia. The teologeme of Sophia is manifested in Solovyov's philosophical system, in his poetic intuitions and mystical visions as well as in the gnostic texts, in the Kabbala tradition and also in the philosophical and biblical teachings. The Divine Wisdom, as the idea of an endeavour to unity appears in a parallel way with the different aspects of the divine and individual Sophia: such as the divine material, the eternal femininity, the Spirit of the world, the image of  ideal humanity etc. The mystery of the Holy Trinity, ie. that God symbolises three persons' unity in love (that of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit), the idea and notion of the number three played an important role in the formation of Solovyov's sophiological teaching. All these were instrumental in the formation of his many-sided and complex Sophia-interpretation.

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Abstract

Art historians are still at fault for the interpretation of the pictures on the outer sides of the wings of the high altar of Saint John the Baptist from Kisszeben (Sabinov). Restoring work in the past decades has explored the original surface of several pictures, leading to an important insight: the reconstruction of the altarpiece in the baroque age left their contents unchanged. It can therefore be concluded that the baroque layer on the unrestored pic tures cannot hide wholly different scenes. What hinders interpretation is rather the deviation from the customary schemes. The narrative compiled from Biblical scenes is “jerky”: the episodes in some places do not follow in chronological order and while several “customary” scenes are missing seemingly without reason, certain scenes appear, however, to be repeated. Even more perplexing are the “hitches”, representations that are hard to interpret on the basis of traditional schemes, which, however, hide the key to the profound message of the high altar with an adequetely strict composition.

The first scene traditionally taken in the literature for The Miraculous catch of Fishes Christ walking on water is actually the appearance of God the Father, and in the second panel Christ's Transfiguration is shown. The two constitute a pair. With an unmistakable gesture the Creator points at Christ who assumed divine glory in the episode of the Transfiguration during his earthly life as well: “This is my beloved Son …hear ye him!”

The next pictures depict seven episodes from Jesus's human life: the Annunciation, Nativity, Ecce Homo, Crucifixion, Christ in Limbo, Resurrection and Ascension. The sequence is followed by the Holy Trinity in the company of music-making angels. Christ seems to have just returned to the Father occupying his due place on the throne after having completed his earthly life. In the next picture of the Deesis he appears as the chief Judge sent by the Father. The lily at the height of his mouth symbolizes celestial judgment, the sword stands for the earthly power of judgment over the resurrected, the living and the dead.

The pair of the Holy Trinity and the Last Judgment returns once more in the last two panels of the sequence. Christ enthroned under the celestial tent and the Father flank the Mother of God. The dove of the Holy Spirit is hovering above them with extended wings. In the lower strip kneeling figures with hands clutched in payer are turning towards them. The scene follows right after the second depiction alluding to the Last Judgment in which the graves burst open to the trumpet call of the angels announcing the resurrection. It is the reward of the just resurrected just people that they receive eternal life in heaven shown in the next panel.

The second, lower, picture of the left-hand moveable wing has a large church as the most accented motif above which in the middle the dove of the Holy Ghost is fluttering. The figures in the garden represent different degrees of religious absorbtion. A child is heading for the house of God with determined steps, the rest are watching him. This scene might as well symbolize divine filiation. The servants of the Law become the children of God who earn the right to eternal life in heaven on Doomsday but whose adoption as the children of God is effected by the Holy Spirit during baptism. People convert upon the influence of the Holy Spirit and hurry to the church. The church building symbolizes in this connection the Church of Christ.

In the next scene, Christ wearing a snow-white mantle in reference to the Lamb of God is surrounded by followers of all ranks and file who are no aliens or strangers any more thanks to Christ's sacrifice on the cross but the “fellows of the saints and the household of God”. The presentation of their group is thus another visualization of the Church of Christ, as was the church building in the previous scene. Next to Christ the Virgin and St John the Evangelist can be seen with St Peter behind them. They are the supporting pillars of the Church. The rest of the people are not characterized as individuals but as social groups, secular and ecclesiastic dignitaries. The young princess on the left holds St Catherine of Alexandria's attribute. On the right, the encumbents of secular and ecclesiastic power, a pope and a king are predominant. In the background on the right the attire of a young man resembles that of a cardinal while a bishop figure rises above the head of St Peter. The kerchieved women and bare-headed men represent the middle and lower classes. The arrangement of the people around Christ is another visualization of the community of the Church of Christ, its cornerstone being the Vir dolorum.

In the next picture a priest with a youthful face puts his right hand on the head of a praying youth. The black vestment and the gesture are symbolic: the picture shows the administration of the sacrament of penance. The men standing withdrawn to the background are witnesses. The hoary old man is holding a crooked stick and rosary in his left hand, the younger one is reading from a book. The wrinkled forehead, grey hair and beard are attributes of asceticism. The stick is an emblem of hermits and pilgrims, as are the rosary and the book. In the Middle Ages hermits and pilgrims were the paragons of counselling on matters of faith. The male figures of the Kisszeben altarpiece may even directly refer to St Antony the Hermit and St John the Evangelist. Reference to the virtues they represent directs the believers' attention to possible ways of absolution.

The contemplation of the workday-side of the altarpiece, the reading of the depictions from left to right guides one to the recognition of the basic message of the series: it is the illustration of the Apostles' Creed in sixteen episodes, proceeding doctrine by doctrine. It is unique and unprecedented in the art of Hungarian altarpieces, or for that matter in a broader geographical context, too. Further research into the patterns used for the individual scenes must go on to discover the model used for the entire cycle. Certain elements of the sequence are tied with several threads to the paintings feastday-side and are not independent of the themes of the superstructure, either. The full iconographic program, which certainly harmonized with the wish of the commissioner, will be known when all these implications have been clarified. The next great task is therefore to find the donator and the author of the program of the Kisszeben altarpiece.

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Abstract

A special iconographic interpretation of the Holy Trinity is represented by an engraving kept in the Strahov abbey library of the Premonstratensian canons of Prague. The print was made after Dionysius Strauss' drawing and is the artist's first extant holy image engraved in copperplate. In the monastery of Hradiško u Olomouce Strauss was regarded as the artist of the order respected for the inventiveness of his themes. It is a known fact from 1695 that he presented a painting on the birthday of prior Bernard Wanzke showing the crucified Christ with the Father and the Holy Spirit with lambs feeding on the blood gushing forth from the Son's side. Undoubtedly, the graphic sheet marked “P. Dion. Straus delin. — J. Tscherning sculp.” was made after the lost painting. The words in the banderole above the composition “ut vitam habeant” (that they may have life) are from St John's gospel (Jn 10,10).

A somewhat modified variant of the theme is a copperplate engraving also from the late 17th century by Johann Gaspar Gutwein (1669–1730) who worked in Prague, Brno, Augsburg, Regensburg and Graz. The print marked “J. G. Gutwein sc. Brunae” probably adorned the flyleaf of a book. This precious specimen of my private collection shows an infant angel with clasped hands behind the cross, with a quotation from St Luke's gospel on the banderole falling down by its elbow: “… parata sunt omnia” (all things are now ready, Luke 14,17). The words refer to the feast of the flock of the Saviour. The blood and water from the side of Christ collected in a pearl-shell refer to the life-giving and maintaining sacraments of baptism and the eucharist from which the scrawny lambs will gain strength.

There is a little known 18th century oil painting in the St Maurice Benedictine monastery of Bakonybél. There are no inscriptions, but white lambs are feeding on the life-giving blood which has cleaned them, flowing from Christ's side into a bowl. The tree of paradise with the serpent is in the background to indicate that Christ's sacrifice on the cross was made in reparation of the original sin: Christ defeated Satan on the cross. This peculiar version of the Holy Trinity representations originated from catholic Moravia in the Tridentine revival of spirituality in Central Europe, as the above described depictions suggest.

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mediere POSDRU/165/6.2/S/140487/manuscript. Peti , Lehel 2016 A Szentlélek ajándékai és karizmatikus rítusok egy moldvai kistérség pünkösdi közösségeiben [Gifts of the Holy Spirit and Charismatic Rituals in the Pentecostal Communities of a Moldavian

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