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), despite the evidence that DON can pass through the porcine placental barrier ( Dänicke et al., 2007; Goyarts et al., 2010 ). Changes in thymus histopathology and architecture are considered particularly relevant when screening for immunotoxicity ( Elmore

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Ildikó Bódi
,
Krisztina H.-Minkó
,
Zsolt Prodán
,
Nándor Nagy
, and
Imre Oláh

–695. 2 Hewson W. Experimental enquiries: part the third. T. Longman, London, 1777. 3 Beard J. The true function of the thymus. Lancet 1899; 153: 144

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The thymus develops from an endocrine area of the foregut, and retains the ancient potencies of this region. However, later it is populated by bone marrow originated lymphatic elements and forms a combined organ, which is a central part of the immune system as well as an influential element of the endocrine orchestra. Thymus produces self-hormones (thymulin, thymosin, thymopentin, and thymus humoral factor), which are participating in the regulation of immune cell transformation and selection, and also synthesizes hormones similar to that of the other endocrine glands such as melatonin, neuropeptides, and insulin, which are transported by the immune cells to the sites of requests (packed transport). Thymic (epithelial and immune) cells also have receptors for hormones which regulate them. This combined organ, which is continuously changing from birth to senescence seems to be a pacemaker of life. This function is basically regulated by the selection of self-responsive thymocytes as their complete destruction helps the development (up to puberty) and their gradual release in case of weakened control (after puberty) causes the erosion of cells and intercellular material, named aging. This means that during aging, self-destructive and non-protective immune activities are manifested under the guidance of the involuting thymus, causing the continuous irritation of cells and organs. Possibly the pineal body is the main regulator of the pacemaker, the neonatal removal of which results in atrophy of thymus and wasting disease and its later corrosion causes the insufficiency of thymus. The co-involution of pineal and thymus could determine the aging and the time of death without external intervention; however, external factors can negatively influence both of them.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors:
Zsuzsanna Pluhár
,
Marianna Kocsis
,
Anett Kuczmog
,
S. Csete
,
Hella Simkó
,
Szilvia Sárosi
,
P. Molnár
, and
Györgyi Horváth

-Stevanović, Z., Šoštarić, I., Marin, P. D., Stojanović, D., Ristić, M. (2008) Population variability in Thymus glabrescens , Willd. from Serbia: morphology, anatomy and essential oil composition. Arch. Biol. Sci. Belgr. 60 , 475

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A csecsemőmirigy T-sejtjeinek összetételében létrejövő változások a COVID–19-pandémia alatt

Changes of the T cell composition in the thymus during the COVID–19 pandemic

Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Judit Lantos
,
József Furák
,
Noémi Zombori-Tóth
,
Tamás Zombori
,
Katalin Bihari
,
Endre Varga
, and
Petra Hartmann

References 1 Miller JF. The discovery of thymus function and of thymus-derived lymphocytes. Immunol Rev. 2002; 185: 7

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species of Lamiaceae family (e.g. Perrino et al . 2021 , Valerio et al . 2021 ); and may be extensively employed, as they are effective as synthetic drugs ( Mgbeahuruike et al . 2017 ). Thymus L. belongs to the Lamiaceae family, which includes over

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thymus. Nat. Rev. Immunol., 2011, 11 (7), 489–495. 5 Csaba, G.: Hormones in the immune system and their possible role. A critical review. Acta Microbiol. Immunol

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] . Thymus vulgaris L. (garden thyme) is an aromatic perennial herbaceous plant, which belongs to the genus Lamiales and family Lamiaceae. The plant is native to Mediterranean countries, where it blossoms in the period of May–July. In Central European

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JPC - Journal of Planar Chromatography - Modern TLC
Authors:
Ágnes Móricz
,
Györgyi Horváth
,
Péter Molnár
,
Béla Kocsis
,
Andrea Böszörményi
,
Éva Lemberkovics
, and
Péter Ott

A. Zarzuelo, E. Crespo , in: Thyme, the genus Thymus, E. Stahl-Biskup, F. Sáez (eds.), Taylor and Francis, London-New York, 2002, pp. 263–292. Crespo E

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors:
Éva Németh-Zámbori
,
Zsuzsanna Pluhár
,
Krisztina Szabó
,
Mahmoud Malekzadeh
,
Péter Radácsi
,
Katalin Inotai
,
Bonifác Komáromi
, and
Katarzyna Seidler-Lozykowska

oil yield and quality of Thymus vulgaris and Thymus daenensis . J. Herbal Drugs 4 , 109 – 113 . 2. Aziz , E. E. , Hendawy , S. F. , E-Din , A. A. , Omer , E. A

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