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Abstract

The understanding of the role of the contemporary translator is fraught with contradictions and idealistic visions of individuals who, by definition, should be fully competent and versatile. In spite of the fact that lots of translation researchers have probed into the identification and exploration of the concept of translator competence, relatively little study has been devoted to training specialised translators and its metacognitive aspects. Due to the dynamic nature of the translator's occupation, it is difficult to predict what specific skills will prove useful for novice specialised translators in their professional career. The article aims to stress the importance of self-study in the specialised translator competence development. First, the author briefly discusses the nature of specialised translator competence in relation to medical translation and then analyses the principles of and approaches to specialised translator training. With the assumption that it is vital for the translator to be a reliable and self-reliant mediator in specialised service environment, the author poses the question of how to implement self-study strategies in specialised translator training. The article demonstrates a number of task-based terminological activities which exemplify the implementation of self-study strategies into project-based specialised translator training.

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practice of translator training. More precisely, we have analysed the relationship among autonomy support, amotivation, critical thinking, and strategic competence as perceived by student translators. Translators' strategic competence has been understood as

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Autonomous learning is a complex and multi-faceted construct. It can be defined as the learners’ capacity to self-direct their own learning, which means taking responsibility for the decisions concerning the different aspects of the learning process. However, there is more to autonomous learning than its purely management aspect. Autonomous learning, first of all, means critical thinking, planning and evaluating learning, and reflection, a conscious effort on the part of the learner to continuously monitor the learning process from beginning to end. This is the cognitive side of autonomous learning. This paper reports on the findings of an empirical investigation conducted at the Interpreter and Translator Training Centre (ITTC) of ELTE University, Budapest, Hungary. ITTC offers post-graduate translator and interpreting training. The current research focuses on the role of autonomous learning in interpreter training in particular. The study explores the research question whether interpreter training at ITTC develops the students’ capacity to carry out autonomous learning. It also intends to ascertain what makes autonomous learning work in the context of postgraduate interpreter training.

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responses of the main employment groups. As mentioned, the graduates were asked “what skills do you wish you had acquired more of in your translator training at the University of Melbourne?”. The responses were on a five-point scale from 1 = not at all to 5

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As Guadec correctly remarked,1 “the job of a translator tends to become more and more of a team job”. Anyone observing current tendencies in the translation market cannot but agree with this statement. Even a brief glance at modern CAT technology solutions available shows beyond doubt that the tendency towards group translation rather than individual translation is already a matter of fact. This state of affairs opens a very interesting domain of theoretically-oriented studies on the meaning of the term “group translation”, its boundary criteria, measurements of success and its logistical background. The present paper is an introductory study marking my first steps in this research direction. I start by defining distinctive constituents of the group translation process, then reflect on modes of their interaction - observed during the group translation sessions of the Warsztaty Translatorskie/Workshop on Translation conference - and discuss the process's influences on students of translation and translators in general.

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Although not always labeled as such, information literacy has been implicitly recognized as a key aspect of translation competence by practitioners, teachers, and scholars. Yet, researchers have only recently begun to systematically examine information behavior in the translation processes of students and professionals to determine how translation-centered information literacy develops. The questions of how and whether translators use the tools and resources at their disposal and how students, novices, and professionals differ in this regard remain to be investigated in detail. The multi-method approach we use to analyze translation competence and information behavior combines data from ethnographic observation of the translation situation, surveys, semi-structured interviews, keystroke logging, computer screenshot recordings, concurrent and cue-based retrospective verbalizations of recorded translation processes, and eye-tracking. We report on the initial phases and results of a study on translators’ information behavior to indicate how this type of research can contribute to understanding the development of translation competence and to improving information literacy teaching.

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This study focuses on the notions of explicitation and implicitation in translation and aims to provide empirical evidence for operational asymmetry (Klaudy 2001). Bi-directional (SL=L1→TL=L2 and SL=L2→TL=L1) comparisons show that when explicitation takes place in the L1→L2 direction, implicitation can be observed in the L2→L1 direction. This phenomenon is referred to as symmetric explicitation. It may also happen, however, that when explicitation is carried out in the L1→L2 direction, no implicitation occurs in the L2→L1 direction. This phenomenon is referred to as asymmetric explicitation. It would be logical to suppose that all cases of language-specific explicitation in the L1→L2 direction are symmetrical (i.e., matched by implicitation in the L2→L1 direction), but this does not seem to be the case. The present paper reports on the findings of an empirical study designed to investigate the validity of the asymmetry hypothesis in the translation of reporting verbs in literary texts translated from English into Hungarian and from Hungarian into English. Using the method of two-way qualitative translation analysis, the study demonstrates that translators tend to prefer the more explicit forms to the more implicit ones in both directions and often fail to perform implicitation. The study may thus provide further evidence for the assumption that semantic explicitation is in fact a universal translation strategy.

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Across Languages and Cultures
Authors:
Brian Mossop
,
Sonja Tirkkonen-Condit
,
Robin Setton
,
Ernst-August Gutt
,
Jean Peeters
, and
Kinga Klaudy

In this article, the six authors discuss the question of whether Translation Studies should devote more attention to the linguistic aspect of translation, in view of the tendency in recent years to focus on its social functioning. In the first part, each author tackles one or more aspects of this issue; in the second part, the authors respond to each other's views. Topics covered include what kind of language production translation is, whether translational language arises out of a particular form of communication or is itself a linguistic system, the relationship of Translation Studies to linguistics and other disciplines, the behaviour of particular language pairs when they clash during translation, translational language from the producer's as opposed to the receiver's viewpoint, and the relation of the linguistic to the social and to the cognitive. Reference is made to methodologies such as keystroke logging and the use of corpora, and also to a range of past and present linguistic approaches to translation, from comparative stylistics to relevance theory. Suggestions are offered regarding the directions to be taken by linguistically oriented studies of translation.

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A fogyasztási cikk terminus és hiponimái az angol és a magyar szakmai nyelvhasználatban

The term consumer goods and its hyponyms in the language of marketing in English and Hungarian

Magyar Terminológia
Author:
Károly Polcz

Az egységes terminushasználat rendkívüli jelentősséggel bír a szakmai nyelvhasználatban, mivel megkönnyíti a szakemberek közötti kommunikációt. Tapasztalatunk szerint a szaknyelvoktatásban és a szakfordító képzésben a terminológiai problémák egyik fő oka, hogy az oktatók, illetve a hallgatók ugyanarra a fogalomra eltérő terminusokat használnak. Ez különösen igaz a marketing szaknyelvre. Tanulmányunk célja, hogy ismertessük a consumer goods (fogyasztási cikkek) és hiponimáinak használatáról végzett vizsgálat eredményeit. Hipotézisünk szerint ezen terminusok használata mindmáig nem egységes az angolról magyarra fordított marketing tankönyvekben, valamint az angol–magyar szakszótárakban. Elemzésünket autentikus angol és magyar nyelvű szakkönyvek, fordítások, illetve szakszótárak alapján végeztük el. A tanulmányban rámutatunk arra, hogy míg az angol nyelvű terminológia egységes, addig a magyar fordítók és szerzők számos esetben ad hoc jelleggel használják a terminusokat, ami terminológiai problémákhoz vezethet mind a szaknyelvoktatásban, mind pedig a fordítóképzésben.

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Time pressure is a challenge for professional translators and deserves systematic consideration in translator training. Until now, time pressure has played only a marginal role in translation studies: To my knowledge, there are only three (series of) studies, of limited scope, conducted by Hönig/Hansen, Jensen and de Rooze. Their experimental designs are analysed in this paper and compared to the author’s own methodological findings. It was found that, in order to obtain valid research results, research results from several disciplines, especially from time-pressure research and endocrinology, must be consistently applied. The main challenges of time-pressure studies are (1) adequately measuring timepressure and (2) creating a situation with no more than one variable parameter. This paper reflects on how the time-pressure variable can be operationalised in order to establish experimental situations where acute and moderate time-pressure is experienced by the subjects. The question of which parameters must remain constant in a valid experimental design is also discussed. The paper concludes by arguing that, at present, no time-pressure study can attempt to obtain more than tentative correlations between time pressure and translation performance. Neuroscientific methods may, however, provide us with a more suitable methodological framework for assessing perceived time pressure in the near future.

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