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; Potenza, Gola, Voon, Kor, & Kraus, 2017 ). Recent studies identified the key characteristics of sexual behavior that differentiate individuals seeking treatment for problematic PU from non-treatment seekers ( Gola et al., 2016 ; Kraus, Martino, et

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Silvia Ronzitti, Vittorio Lutri, Neil Smith, Massimo Clerici and Henrietta Bowden-Jones

, Stinson, & Grant, 2005 ). Although characteristics of pathological gamblers from the general population have been examined on a satisfactory sample, a few studies, to our knowledge, have examined the treatment-seeking population, reporting

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Roser Granero, Fernando Fernández-Aranda, Gemma Mestre-Bach, Trevor Steward, Bárbara García-Caro, Fulvia Prever, Belle Gavriel-Fried, Amparo del Pino-Gutiérrez, Laura Moragas, Neus Aymamí, Mónica Gómez-Peña, Teresa Mena-Moreno, Virginia Martín-Romera, José M. Menchón and Susana Jiménez-Murcia

have mainly been focused on males, since the prevalence of GD is significantly higher in men than women ( Blanco, Hasin, Petry, Stinson, & Grant, 2006 ; Granero et al., 2009 ), around the ratio of 1:3 in samples of treatment-seeking patients ( Crisp et

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behaviors and cognitive domains relevant to impulsivity, in a non-treatment seeking sample of young adults with varying levels of sleepiness. We hypothesized that problems with sleepiness would be associated with a greater likelihood of having impulse

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Gustavo C. Medeiros, Daniela G. Sampaio, Eric W. Leppink, Samuel R. Chamberlain and Jon E. Grant

gamblers, subsyndromal GD, and GD) in a non-treatment-seeking sample. We assessed the current severity of anxiety symptoms and associations between anxiety symptom severity, gambling symptoms, impulsiveness, and neurocognition. We predicted that anxiety

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Silvia Ronzitti, Emiliano Soldini, Vittorio Lutri, Neil Smith, Massimo Clerici and Henrietta Bowden-Jones

study, we have examined the extent to which particular forms of gambling were associated with problem gambling symptoms in a treatment-seeking population. First, we analyzed the frequencies of different types of gambling. This study supports the previous

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Liana R. N. Schreiber, Katherine Lust, Brian Odlaug, Katherine L. Derbyshire and Jon Grant

Abstract

Background and aims

Hair pulling is a common body focused repetitive behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (as defined in DSM-IV-TR) in a non-treatment seeking sample of hair pullers.

Methods

1,717 college students with (n = 44) and without (n = 1673) hair pulling completed a mental health survey. The college students were sent an online survey assessing hair pulling behavior and other impulse control disorders using the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview.

Results

Students with hair pulling were significantly more likely to have a co-occurring impulse control disorder (20.5% vs. 8.9%, p = 0.009, OR = 2.71, CI = 1.28–5.75) and were significantly more likely to meet criteria for compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior and intermittent explosive disorder than students without hair pulling. Differences seemed to be moderated by the male gender among students with hair pulling.

Discussion and conclusions

Hair pulling is often comorbid with another impulse control disorder, which suggests that elements of impulsivity may be important in our understanding of hair pulling. Furthermore, gender may moderate impulse control comorbidity in hair pulling disorder.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Núria Mallorquí-Bagué, Teresa Mena-Moreno, Roser Granero, Cristina Vintró-Alcaraz, Jéssica Sánchez-González, Fernando Fernández-Aranda, Amparo Del Pino-Gutiérrez, Gemma Mestre-Bach, Neus Aymamí, Mónica Gómez-Peña, José M. Menchón and Susana Jiménez-Murcia

.e., suppression and reappraisal) in an adult sample of consecutive treatment-seeking patients diagnosed with GD. We specifically compared patients who reported suicidal ideation (with or without a history of suicide attempts) with those who did not, in order to

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Inclusion of gaming disorder criteria in ICD-11: A clinical perspective in favor

Commentary on: Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal (Aarseth et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Susumu Higuchi, Hideki Nakayama, Satoko Mihara, Masaki Maezono, Takashi Kitayuguchi and Takuma Hashimoto

Data from a specialist treatment facility for Internet addiction (IA) in Japan showed that (a) the vast majority of treatment seekers are addicted to online games, (b) their symptoms are often quite severe, and (c) there is a significant demand for IA treatment. In addition, systemic obstacles to the delivery of medical services in Japan exist due to the exclusion of IA criteria from ICD-10. Consequently, the inclusion of GD criteria in ICD-11 will almost certainly increase the capacity and quality of treatment through advances in research and possible changes in national medical systems to meet treatment demand.

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legalizing commercial casino gambling. Scarcity of studies on treatment-seeking behaviors among pathological gamblers and associated treatment provision along with recent legislation provides the impetus to this study. This study assessed the sociodemographic

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