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Authors: Mária Resch and Tamás Bella

-fenyegettek-az-elhunyt-motoros-rendort.html , 2010.11.26.(20.20.) Mohandie, K., Hatcher, C., Raymond, D.: False victimization syndromes in stalking. In: The psychology of stalking: clinical and forensic perspectives. Ed.: Meloy, J. R. Academic

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Authors: Nicki A. Dowling, Carrie Ewin, George J. Youssef, Stephanie S. Merkouris, Aino Suomi, Shane A. Thomas and Alun C. Jackson

reported high rates of past-year IPV victimization (7%–69%) ( Echeburua, Gonzalez-Ortega, de Corral, & Polo-Lopez, 2011 ; Korman et al., 2008 ; Palmer du Preez et al., 2018 ; Raylu & Oei, 2009 ) and perpetration (31%–56%) ( Korman et al., 2008 ; Lorenz

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. Gamez-guadix , M. , Straus , M. A. and Hershberger , S. (in press): Childhood and adolescent victimization and perpetration of sexual coercion by male and female university students . Deviant Behavior

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This interdisciplinary study shall explore the implications of coercive conduct in the course of criminal procedures, both in the legal theoretical and the practical sense of the term. We shall make a distinction between legal-necessary and illegal-unnecessary coercive conduct and the forms of its implementation. These issues will be analysed in the respective stages of the procedure (investigation-detention-court trial-law enforcement). The study will explore the issue both from the viewpoint of the victim and the parties concerned in the procedure, who are subjected to coercive conduct, furthermore will highlight the major features of the offences affecting them. It shall discuss victimisation catalysts and their functions and finally, assess the ways of reducing the potential of related secondary victimisation.

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. Victimology. The victim and the criminal justice process Zvekic, Ugljesa (1998): Criminal Victimisation in Countries in Transition. Rome, UNICRI

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Imre Kertész was among the 82,000 Hungarian Jews who returned in 1945. The transition from camp to home, the adjustment fom adolescent trauma to adult life is only hinted at in his works. This paper situates Kertész in the identity crisis of the immediate postwar period. The confusion of displaced identities in the aftermath of WWII, prompted psychologist Erik Erikson to universalize the adolescent identity crisis as a central contemporary problem. In Hungary not only Jews but the entire society was reforging identities. Borders were porous, so were political and religious affiliations. Kertész's identity was defined, at least in a negative way, by the Holocaust: as a Jew without being a Jew, as a survivor when it was best to keep quiet. He lived in the constant of the world of Buchenwald and of Stalinist Hungary, with their constricted options and ideological imperatives fashioned upon twisted idealisms. His recreation of the Holocaust in Fateless and of the existentialist experience of living with memory in Kaddish, has made for disquieting reading abroad, as well. In ignoring heroic clichés he has transgressed the identity of victim and victimizer.

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. , ‘ Protection of Children and Other Vulnerable Victims Against Secondary Victimisation: Making it Easier to Testify in Court ’ ( 2009 ) 10 ERA Forum 387 – 396 . Schweighart , Zs

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, S. , & Molcho , M. ( 2015 ). Cross-national time trends in bullying victimization in 33 countries among children aged 11, 13 and 15 from 2002 to 2010 , European Journal of Public Health , 25 ( 2 ), 61 – 64

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Authors: H. Clark Barrett, Monika Keller, Masanori Takezawa and Szymon Wichary

. Lover 1995 Children's conceptions of sociomoral affect: Happy victimizers, mixed emotions and other expectancies M. Killen D

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Authors: Michael W. Firmin, Alisha D. Lee, Ruth L. Firmin, Lauren McCotter Deakin and Hannah J. Holmes

1993 Your life is on the line every night you're on the streets: Victimization and the resistance among street prostitutes Humanity & Society 17 442 446

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