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Abrahamsen, Povl (1967) Königliche Hochzeit. Szenerie und Hintergrund (Kopenhagen: Königlich Dänisches Ministerium des Äusseren). Allerston, Patricia (1998) ’Wedding Finery in 16th

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through the staging of the community’s wedding customs. Recognition for the settlement was generated by the inaugural performance of the Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, formed in 1951, which included, among other things, the stage production of the wedding

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Juno, the goddess of marriage who is able – in her form of Lucina – to bring children to light, does not appear to be particularly “motherly” in the ancient sources. I will explain this paradox showing that both attitudes are aspects of Juno’s control over motherhood and childbirth, which can manifest itself both in a negative and in a positive way. Moreover, I will show how control over motherhood and childbirth is nothing but one of the numerous tasks which the feminea dea par excellence has to perform in order to regulate the roles of the Roman women.

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This paper aims to provide a comparative analysis of the Latin metrical rewritings of Joh. 2:1–11 written between the 4th and the end of the 5th century. The first part of the study will provide a thorough commentary to Iuvenc. II 127–152 and Sedul. carm. pasch. III 1–11, highlighting the peculiarities of their approach towards the Gospel narrative and interpreting them in light of the different cultural operations realised by the two paraphrasts. In the second part, peculiar attention will be devoted to the tituli by Prudentius, Ps. Claudian, and Rusticus Helpidius, which provide a much abbreviated ‘Umdichtung’ of John’s pericope, but still reveal some interest in major descriptive and exegetic details; in the conclusion, a brief iconographic survey will try to determine the tituli’s most probable iconographic “models”.

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This paper attempts to solve a difficult textual problem in Pindar (N. 5. 43). Although the manuscripts concerning this verse are unanimous, editors tend to correct the passage. I, on the other hand, argue in favour of preserving the tradition in the sense: immo nuper delectat Neptunum ad gentem Pelei cognatam etiam nunc transgressum materterus tuus, Pythea. Implications of the suggested new interpretation are presented.

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Szeged-Alsóváros. Templom és társadalom [Szeged-Alsóváros. Church and Society]. Budapest : Szent István Társulat . Bárth , Dániel 2005 Esküvő, keresztelő, avatás. Egyház és népi kultúra a kora újkori Magyarországon [Wedding, Christening

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Hungaricae III/A. Wedding . Ed. Kiss, Lajos. Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 1955. A Magyar Népzene Tára / Corpus Musicae Popularis Hungaricae III/A. Wedding 1955 Medgyesy , Norbert 2009: A

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Acta Ethnographica Hungarica
Authors: Dóra Kovács, Vivien Szőnyi, Beáta Gatti, Petra Horváth-Bálint, Judit Czövek, Katalin Fenyves, Tamás Ildikó, Sándor Varga, and Gábor Vargyas

Literature G ráfik , Imre 1992 : Vers és szövegváltozatok a széki lakodalomból [Verse and Text Variants from the Szék Wedding] . In: V iga , Gyula (ed.): Kultúra és tradíció I. Tanulmányok Ujváry Zoltán tiszteletére. [ Culture and

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By analyzing enunciation in performance, this article shows the similarities among funeral laments, epic songs, exile songs and the playing of the duduk (oboe). Regarded as “words on” (kilamê ser), these four types of enunciation share melodic, metric, gestural and emotional elements. According to local typologies, the “words on” are opposed to songs (stran), a term referring mostly to wedding music and the zurna (oboe). The opposition between word and song is also related to a series of antinomic couples, such as exile vs. household, sadness vs. joy, or duduk vs. zurna. An analysis of these music and enunciation typologies of emotion allows an approach to Yezidi ritual and calendar time.

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Hebrew was the main language of the early modern Karaim culture. Nearly all Polish–Lithuanian Karaim scholars wrote poetry in Hebrew for various occasions celebrating the Karaim cycle of life: for Sabbaths and festivals, for weddings and circumcisions, or as eulogies for a fellow scholar. Their poems cover exegetical, philosophical, and mystical topics from a Karaim point of view and contain historical details about Karaim life in Eastern Europe. Karaim Hebrew poets followed the footsteps of earlier Karaite generations: Byzantine Karaite poetry, emulating the Andalusian standards of poetics and familiarised through shared literary sources, served as their main literary model.

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