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The yield potential of wheat depends not only on genetic × environmental interactions, but also on various agronomic factors such as sowing date or the seed rate used for sowing. The main aim of this work was to determine possible correlations between the effects of different sowing dates and plant densities on the yield components of a collection of 48 wheat genotypes. Two-way analysis of variance on the data revealed that both sowing date and plant density, as main components, only had a minor effect on the yield component patterns. Correlation analysis, however, indicated that the sowing date had a greater effect on the yield components, while plant density was in closer correlation with the heading time (r = 0.90). The patterns determined for individual yield components at two different sowing dates and plant densities showed significant differences for spike length, spike fertility, grain number in the main spike, number of productive tillers, grain number on side tillers, mean grain number and grain weight. Genotypes that carry the winter (recessive) alleles of genes regulating vernalisation processes (VRN-A1, VRN-B1, VRN-D1) and the sensitive (recessive) alleles of the two genes responsible for photoperiod sensitivity (PPD-B1, PPD-D1) may have better tillering and consequently higher grain yield, though this may depend greatly on the year.

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Studies on plant development phases and yield component patterns of wheat are essential for a better understanding of adaptation in wheat. Our main aim was to carry out detailed phenological analyses of 18 wheat genotypes in three sowing times for determining the effect of sowing date on individual phenophases, and yield components. Sowing date had the single greatest effect on the start of intensive stem elongation. The longer vegetation period had a favourable effect on main spike length and on the spikelet number per spike, but had no influence on thousand-kernel weight and grain number per spike. The time between the first node appearance and start of intensive stem elongation had a significant effect on the number of reproductive tillers. A close association (R2 = 0.191) was observed during the second phase of intensive stem elongation between the boot stage-to-heading interval and the number of spikelets per spike. Two-way analysis of variance on the yield components showed that the sowing date, as a main factor, had a weaker effect on the phenophases than on morphological and developmental parameters. The insensitive allele of the Ppd-D1 gene shortened the time required for first node appearance and heading both in autumn and spring sowing.

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Wild diploid goatgrass, Aegilops tauschii Coss., is the D-genome donor to hexaploid bread wheat. Goatgrass has been crossed with tetraploid durum wheat (Triticum turgidum var. durum L.) and hexaploid bread wheat (T. aestivum L. ssp. aestivum) to broaden the genetic base of bread wheat. We examined the contribution of main stem water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) and current assimilates to grain yield in one goatgrass relative to those in one durum and four cultivars of bread wheat under well-watered and droughted field conditions across two years. Drought reduced grain yield and its components. Number of tillers per plant was higher in goatgrass, but 55% of tillers produced were sterile. Number of grains per spike was lower in goatgrass. Grain weight was the component severely limiting potential yield in goatgrass. Main stem WSC and concentration was lowest in goatgrass. Linear rate of grain growth in goatgrass was 20 and 17 mg spike−1 day−1 under well-watered and droughted conditions, whereas those in durum and bread wheats ranged from 55 to 73 and from 37 to 60 mg spike−1day−1, respectively. Current assimilates were the major source of carbon to fill the grains under both irrigation regimes. A large number of goatgrass accessions and adapted durum cultivars should be examined for grain yield and its components to identify promising accessions to be used in producing synthetics.

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. aestivum L.). Indian J. Agric. Sci. , 8 , 189-191. Diallel analysis for yield and its components in bread wheat (T. aestivum L.). Indian J. Agric. Sci. 8

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.G., Gill, B. S., 1989. Monosomic analysis of tissue culture response in wheat ( T. aestivum L. ). Theor. Appl. Genet. 78: 625–632 Gill B. S. Monosomic analysis of tissue culture

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Pónya, Z., Timar, I., Szabó, L., Kristóf, Z., Barnabás, B. 1999b: Morphological characterisation of wheat ( T. aestivum L.) egg cell protoplasts isolated from immature and overaged caryopses. Sex. Plant Reprod. , 11 , 357

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Marijana Baric, Hrvoje Sarcevic, Snjezana Keresa, Ivanka Habus Jercic and Ivana Rukavina

Baric M. — Keresa S. — Sarcevic H. — Habus Jercic I. — Horvat D. — Drezner G.: 2006. Influence of drought during the grain filling period to the yield and quality of winter wheat ( T. aestivum L.) — Proceedings of 3rd

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of genetic and environmental variability for yield and yield components for common wheat (T. aestivum L. em Thell.) cultivars in the Çukurova Region. Journal of the Faculty of Agric., Çukurova Univ. , 4, 1-36. Determination

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Raghuvanshi, K. M. S., Singh, S. P., Rao, S. K., Singh, C. B. (1988): Diallel analysis for yield and its components in bread wheat ( T. aestivum L.). Indian J. Agric. Sci. , 8 , 189–191. Singh C. B

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of potassium use efficiency in wheat ( T. aestivum L.) grown under potassium stress. Plant & Soil , 151 , 39-44. Genotype - environment interaction and correlation between vegetative and grain production measures of

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