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English and French writing 2009 Lefer, M.-A. 2010. Word-formation in English-French Bilingual Dictionaries: The Contribution

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Aronoff, Mark 1976. Word-formation in generative grammar (Linguistic Inquiry Monographs 1). MIT Press, Cambridge MA. Aronoff M

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Adams, Valerie 1973. An introduction to Modern English word formation. Longman, London. Adams V. An introduction

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In this paper I discuss Kenesei’s (2005) syntactic derivational approach to s complex event nominals in Hungarian, and I compare it with previous lexicalist analyses. I demonstrate that the facts that, according to Kenesei, call for a syntactic analysis (e.g., binding and control phenomena, anti-agreement, negation, and aspect) can be captured in an appropriately developed lexicalist framework with at least the same degree of efficiency, consistency and in a sufficiently principled manner. I outline the most important aspects of such an analysis in the framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar. I also point out that there are additional considerations which support a lexical treatment.

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This paper analyzes the derivation capability of verbs motivated by substantives with the word-formation meaning ‘to work with a tool, named by a word-forming noun’ with suffix -ува-/-юва- in the Ukrainian language. The author claims that the typical word-forming paradigm is formed of three word-formation zones: substantive, adjective, and verbal. Within each zone, a continuum of word-forming derivatives is distinguished, a set of word-forming devices for their realizations is determined, and the abilities of some of them to express additional lexical meanings are traced.

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The present article is dedicated to the study of interlingual contacts based on the facts given by the history of the Hungarian personal suffix -as. This suffix is used in modern Serbian, Croatian, Yugoslav-Ruthenian, Slovenian and Slovak literary languages and dialects. People speaking these dialects have been living for a long time in these territories that used to be a part of the Hungarian kingdom. The history of this suffix, its functioning and its present status is demonstrated on the basis of Carpathian and Ruthenian written old and new texts. The productivity of the borrowed personal suffix - ?? (-??) is considered to be a result of active interlingual contacts in the Carpathian region and also of the considerable influence of Hungarian on the language and culture in the  Southern Carpathian hills. There are many words in modern Carpatho-Rusyn texts which are borrowed from Hungarian, e.g.: ???????, ??????, ??????, ??????, ??????, ????????? etc. Some of them appear in word formation paradigms of the Carpatho-Rusyn motivated words, e.g.:????????, ????????????, ????????, ???????, ??????, ??????? and so on. The result of the Carpatho-Rusyn and Hungarian language contacts on word formation level testifies to a very intensive interaction. In modern Ruthenian the same tendency is to be observed: numerous lexical borrowings from Hungarian exist side by side with borrowings of units on a more abstract level. In our case the word formation suffix ?? (-??) with a personal meaning is of Hungarian origin and it is very productive in modern Carpatho-Rusyn.

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formation]. In: Kiefer (2000, 137-64). A szóképzés [Word formation] 2000 137 64

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. Tvorba rijeci u hrvatskome književnom jeziku. [Word formation in Croatian literary language] . Zagreb : Hrvatska akademija znanosti i umjetnosti & Globus . Babic, Stjepan

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On-line ``chat'' communication combines elements of speech and writing. Specific lexical forms arise which characterize such cyberspeech. The paper provides an analysis of lexical forms underlying the discourse of on-line chats. It also attempts to answer the question of whether native forms of on-line communication should be tackled as part of foreign language teaching.

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