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Board, J.E., Kang, M.S. and Bodrero, M.L. (2003). Yield components as indirect selection criteria for late planted soybean cultivars. Agron. J. 95, 420–429. Bodrero

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518 Doddamani, I. K., Patil, S. A., Ravikumar, R. L. (1997): Relationship of autogramy and self fertility with seed yield and yield components in sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L

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Scarisbrick, D. H., Daniels, H., Rawi, A. B. N. 1982: The effect of varying seed rate on the yield and yield components of oilseed rape (B. napus). J. Agric. Sci. Camb. , 99 , 561-568. The effect of varying seed rate on the yield

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60 31 44 Giunta, F., Motzo, R., Deidda, M. (1993): Effect of drought on yield and yield components of durum wheat and triticale in a Mediterranean

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. 2016 . Performance of soft red winter wheat subjected to field soil waterlogging: Grain yield and yield components . Field Crop. Res. 194 : 57 – 64 . Ashraf , M

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The yield potential of wheat depends not only on genetic × environmental interactions, but also on various agronomic factors such as sowing date or the seed rate used for sowing. The main aim of this work was to determine possible correlations between the effects of different sowing dates and plant densities on the yield components of a collection of 48 wheat genotypes. Two-way analysis of variance on the data revealed that both sowing date and plant density, as main components, only had a minor effect on the yield component patterns. Correlation analysis, however, indicated that the sowing date had a greater effect on the yield components, while plant density was in closer correlation with the heading time (r = 0.90). The patterns determined for individual yield components at two different sowing dates and plant densities showed significant differences for spike length, spike fertility, grain number in the main spike, number of productive tillers, grain number on side tillers, mean grain number and grain weight. Genotypes that carry the winter (recessive) alleles of genes regulating vernalisation processes (VRN-A1, VRN-B1, VRN-D1) and the sensitive (recessive) alleles of the two genes responsible for photoperiod sensitivity (PPD-B1, PPD-D1) may have better tillering and consequently higher grain yield, though this may depend greatly on the year.

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Maize (Zea mays L.) yield component analysis is limited. Research was conducted in 2012 and 2013 at Zagreb, Croatia and Mead, Nebraska, United States with the objective to determine the influence of environment, hybrid maturity, and plant population (PP) on maize yield and yield components. Three maturity classes of maize hybrids were produced at five PP ranging from 65,000 to 105,000 plants ha−1 under rainfed conditions. Yield, ears m−2, rows ear−1, ear circumference, kernels ear−1, kernels row−1, ear length, and kernel weight were determined. Average yield was 10.7 t ha−1, but was variable for hybrids across PP. The early maturity-hybrids had lesser ear circumference, more kernels ear−1, greater ear length, and fewer rows ear−1 than mid- and late-maturity hybrids. Kernels ear−1 had the highest correlation with yield (r = 0.47; P < 0.01 for early-maturity hybrids; r = 0.55; P < 0.01 for the mid- and late-maturity hybrids). Path analysis indicated that ears m−2, kernels ear−1 and kernel weight had similar direct effects on yield for early-maturity hybrids (R = 0.41 to 0.48) while kernels ear−1 had the largest direct effect (R = 0.58 versus 0.32 to 0.36) for the midand late-maturity hybrids. Rows ear−1 had an indirect effects on yield (R = 0.30 to 0.33) for all hybrids, while kernels row−1 had indirect effect (R = 0.46) on yield for mid- and latematurity hybrids. Yield component compensation was different for early-maturity hybrid than the mid- and late-maturity hybrids, likely due to the proportion of southern dent and northern flint germplasm present in these hybrids.

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Waxy wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is grown throughout the world for its specific quality. Fertilization and planting density are two crucial factors that affect waxy wheat yield and photosynthetic capacity. The objectives of the research were to determine the effects of fertilization and planting density on photosynthetic characteristics, yield, and yield components of waxy wheat, including Yield, SSR, TGW, GNPP, GWPP, PH, HI, Pn, Gs, Ci, E and WUE using the method of field experiment, in which there were three levels (150, 300, and 450 kg ha−1) of fertilizer application rate and three levels (1.35, 1.8, and 2.25 × 106 plants ha−1) of planting density. The results suggested that photosynthetic characteristics, yield, and yield components had close relationship with fertilization levels and planting density. Under the same plant density, with the increase of fertilization, Yield, SSR, TGW, GNPP, GWPP, HI, Pn, Gs, E and WUE increased and then decreased, PH increased, but Ci decreased. Under the same fertilization, with the increase of plant density, Yield, SSR, TGW, GNPP, GWPP, HI increased and then decreased, PH, Pn, Gs and E increased, PH and WUE declined. The results also showed that F2 (300 kg ha−1) and D2 (1.8 × 106 plants ha−1) was a better match in this experiment, which could obtain a higher grain yield 4961.61 kg ha−1. Consequently, this combination of fertilizer application rate and plant densities are useful to get high yield of waxy wheat.

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., Porksen, N. (1992): Phenotypic plasticity in growth and yield components of linseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) in response to spacing and N-nutrition. J. Agron. and Crop Sci. , 169 , 46-60. Phenotypic plasticity in growth and

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.) Anderson, W. K. (1986): Some relationships between plant population, yield components and grain yield of wheat in a Mediterranean environment. Aust. J. Agric. Res. , 37, 219-233. Some relationships between plant population, yield

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