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Abstract

The laboratory micro X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) technique is a suitable method to study minerals in-situ in whole-rock specimens without any sample preparation or in polished thin sections, and even in small amounts in powdered form. The micro X-ray diffraction method uses the conventional, closed-tube X-ray generator, but modifications were needed in the diffraction column, sample holder and detector in order to achieve μ-XRD capability.

In this paper, we present a case study of the capillary method used in µ-XRD on hydrothermal clay mineral assemblages that formed in the Velence Mts (Hungary). The capillary method in µ-XRD has many advantages in the investigation of small amounts of clay minerals: (1) easy and rapid preparation of randomly oriented, powdered samples; (2) rapid measurements; (3) accurate diffraction patterns. By using the capillary method, the formation of preferred orientation can be eliminated; thus the (hkl) reflection of the clay minerals can be precisely measured. Illite polytype quantification and the investigation of (060) reflection of clay minerals can be used satisfactorily in µ-XRD.

Hydrothermal clay mineral assemblages are indicative of temperature and pH. Their examination can determine the physicochemical parameters of the hydrothermal fluids that interacted with the host granite in the Velence Mts. The analyzed hydrothermal clay minerals from the western part of the mountains suggest lower temperatures (150–200 °C) and intermediate pH conditions. In contrast, the clay mineral assemblages' characteristics for the eastern part of the mountains indicate more intense argillization and higher temperatures (∼220 °C) and intermediate pH conditions.

Open access

Abstract

Permian felsic volcanic rocks were encountered in petroleum exploration boreholes in SE Hungary (eastern Pannonian Basin, Tisza Mega-unit, Békés–Codru Unit) during the second half of the 20th century. They were considered to be predominantly lavas (the so-called “Battonya quartz-porphyry”) and were genetically connected to the underlying “Battonya granite.” New petrographic observations, however, showed that the presumed lavas are crystal-poor (8–20 vol%) rhyolitic ignimbrites near Battonya and resedimented pyroclastic or volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in the Tótkomlós and the Biharugra areas, respectively. The studied ignimbrites are usually massive, matrix-supported, fiamme-bearing lapilli tuffs with eutaxitic texture as a result of welding processes. Some samples lack vitroclastic matrix and show low crystal breakage, but consist of oriented, devitrified fiammes as well. Textural features suggest that the latter are high-grade rheomorphic ignimbrites.

Felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary belong to the Permian volcanic system of the Tisza Mega-unit; however, they show remarkable petrographic differences as compared to the other Permian felsic volcanic rocks of the mega-unit. In contrast to the crystal-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites of SE Hungary with rare biotite, the predominantly rhyodacitic–dacitic pyroclastic rocks of the Tisza Mega-unit are crystal-rich (40–45 vol%) and often contain biotite, pyroxene, and garnet. Additionally, some geochemical and geochronological differences between them were also observed by previous studies. Therefore, the Permian felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary might represent the most evolved, crystal-poor rhyolitic melt of a large-volume felsic (rhyodacitic–dacitic) volcanic system.

The Permian volcanic rocks of the studied area do not show any evident correlations with either the Permian felsic ignimbrites in the Finiş Nappe (Apuseni Mts, Romania), as was supposed so far, or the similar rocks in any nappe of the Codru Nappe System. Moreover, no relevant plutonic–volcanic connection was found between the studied samples and the underlying “Battonya granite.”

Open access

Abstract

Permian felsic volcanic rocks were encountered in petroleum exploration boreholes in SE Hungary (eastern Pannonian Basin, Tisza Mega-unit, Békés–Codru Unit) during the second half of the 20th century. They were considered to be predominantly lavas (the so-called “Battonya quartz-porphyry”) and were genetically connected to the underlying “Battonya granite.” New petrographic observations, however, showed that the presumed lavas are crystal-poor (8–20 vol%) rhyolitic ignimbrites near Battonya and resedimented pyroclastic or volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in the Tótkomlós and the Biharugra areas, respectively. The studied ignimbrites are usually massive, matrix-supported, fiamme-bearing lapilli tuffs with eutaxitic texture as a result of welding processes. Some samples lack vitroclastic matrix and show low crystal breakage, but consist of oriented, devitrified fiammes as well. Textural features suggest that the latter are high-grade rheomorphic ignimbrites.

Felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary belong to the Permian volcanic system of the Tisza Mega-unit; however, they show remarkable petrographic differences as compared to the other Permian felsic volcanic rocks of the mega-unit. In contrast to the crystal-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites of SE Hungary with rare biotite, the predominantly rhyodacitic–dacitic pyroclastic rocks of the Tisza Mega-unit are crystal-rich (40–45 vol%) and often contain biotite, pyroxene, and garnet. Additionally, some geochemical and geochronological differences between them were also observed by previous studies. Therefore, the Permian felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary might represent the most evolved, crystal-poor rhyolitic melt of a large-volume felsic (rhyodacitic–dacitic) volcanic system.

The Permian volcanic rocks of the studied area do not show any evident correlations with either the Permian felsic ignimbrites in the Finiş Nappe (Apuseni Mts, Romania), as was supposed so far, or the similar rocks in any nappe of the Codru Nappe System. Moreover, no relevant plutonic–volcanic connection was found between the studied samples and the underlying “Battonya granite.”

Open access

Abstract

The fuzzy clustering technique is one of the ways of organizing data that presents special patterns using algorithms and based on the similarity level of data. In this study, in order to cluster the resulting data from the Babakoohi Anticline joints, located north of Shiraz, K-means and genetic algorithms are applied. The K-means algorithm is one of the clustering algorithms easily implemented and of fast performance; however, sometimes this algorithm is located in the local optimal trap and cannot respond with an optimal answer, due to the sensitivity of this algorithm to the centers of the primary cluster. In addition, it has some basic disadvantages, such as its inappropriateness for complicated forms and also the dependency of the final result upon the primary cluster. Therefore, in order to perform the study more accurately and to obtain more reliable results, the genetic algorithm is used for categorizing the data of joints of the studied area. Applying this algorithm for leaving the local optimal points is an effective way. The results of clustering of the aforementioned data using the two above techniques represent two clusters in the Babakoohi Anticline. Furthermore, for validity and surveying of the results of the suggested techniques, various mathematical and statistical techniques, including ICC, Vw, VMPC, and VPMBF, are applied, which supports the similarity of the obtained results and the data clustering process in two algorithms.

Open access

Abstract

The fuzzy clustering technique is one of the ways of organizing data that presents special patterns using algorithms and based on the similarity level of data. In this study, in order to cluster the resulting data from the Babakoohi Anticline joints, located north of Shiraz, K-means and genetic algorithms are applied. The K-means algorithm is one of the clustering algorithms easily implemented and of fast performance; however, sometimes this algorithm is located in the local optimal trap and cannot respond with an optimal answer, due to the sensitivity of this algorithm to the centers of the primary cluster. In addition, it has some basic disadvantages, such as its inappropriateness for complicated forms and also the dependency of the final result upon the primary cluster. Therefore, in order to perform the study more accurately and to obtain more reliable results, the genetic algorithm is used for categorizing the data of joints of the studied area. Applying this algorithm for leaving the local optimal points is an effective way. The results of clustering of the aforementioned data using the two above techniques represent two clusters in the Babakoohi Anticline. Furthermore, for validity and surveying of the results of the suggested techniques, various mathematical and statistical techniques, including ICC, Vw, VMPC, and VPMBF, are applied, which supports the similarity of the obtained results and the data clustering process in two algorithms.

Open access

Abstract

In June 2017 a new sauropod trackway locality was discovered in the central part of the Adriatic–Dinaric Carbonate Platform (ADCP), on the island of Hvar (Croatia). The track site is situated on the northern shore of the western edge (Pelegrin) of the island in the upper Turonian – lower Coniacian limestone series. The track site contains altogether 13 footprints arranged in four possible trackways. The largest footprints have a diameter up to 80 cm. In some places the limestone surface is strongly karstified and the tracks are partly eroded, which has certainly modified the original shape and size of the footprints. Microfossil assemblage from the track-bearing beds suggest an early Coniacian age for the tracks. The new trackways on Hvar Island further strengthen the earlier hypothesis that sauropods were present in the western Tethyan archipelago during the late Cenomanian–late Campanian period. In addition, the new tracks, together with those from the Žukova Cove of Hvar, represent two, possibly slightly different stratigraphic horizons close to the Turonian–Coniacian boundary, and suggest that the occurrence of sauropods on the ADCP and possibly also on other parts of the Apulian microplate was not accidental, but rather periodical and more frequent than previously thought.

Open access

Abstract

In June 2017 a new sauropod trackway locality was discovered in the central part of the Adriatic–Dinaric Carbonate Platform (ADCP), on the island of Hvar (Croatia). The track site is situated on the northern shore of the western edge (Pelegrin) of the island in the upper Turonian – lower Coniacian limestone series. The track site contains altogether 13 footprints arranged in four possible trackways. The largest footprints have a diameter up to 80 cm. In some places the limestone surface is strongly karstified and the tracks are partly eroded, which has certainly modified the original shape and size of the footprints. Microfossil assemblage from the track-bearing beds suggest an early Coniacian age for the tracks. The new trackways on Hvar Island further strengthen the earlier hypothesis that sauropods were present in the western Tethyan archipelago during the late Cenomanian–late Campanian period. In addition, the new tracks, together with those from the Žukova Cove of Hvar, represent two, possibly slightly different stratigraphic horizons close to the Turonian–Coniacian boundary, and suggest that the occurrence of sauropods on the ADCP and possibly also on other parts of the Apulian microplate was not accidental, but rather periodical and more frequent than previously thought.

Open access

Abstract

With the introduction of the Water Framework Directive, the relative importance of smaller waterways increased. This statement is particularly true for Hungary, where water-quality monitoring of most smaller rivers only began 12 years ago. Due to their large number, and the lack of historical data concerning their state, systematic monitoring is a challenge.

In the current study, 101 creeks are characterized on the one hand by 13 physico-chemical quality parameters (pH, electric conductivity, chloride ion concentration, dissolved oxygen, oxygen saturation, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, ammonium nitrogen, total inorganic nitrogen, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus), on the other hand by their watershed's relief, land use, and point sources' pollution indicators. Euclidean distance between water bodies (henceforth WBs) is calculated according to normalized physico-chemical monitoring values. They are grouped into clusters using the hierarchical clustering method. Watershed characteristics are used to explain the clustering via linear discriminant analysis.

The investigation revealed that the main driver of cluster group creation is related to human impact: diffuse agricultural and point-source pollution. The first of the three clusters involved water bodies with low or no human impact; the second cluster contained those with medium-level anthropogenic disturbance, while waters with high pollution values formed the third cluster. Mean distance between heavily polluted waters was 1.5 times higher than that between those showing no or low disturbance, meaning that pristine waters are more similar to one another than polluted ones. The current number of samples per river is twice as high in cluster 1 as in cluster 3, revealing that there is room for optimization of the monitoring system. This contribution uses Hungary as a case study.

Open access

Abstract

With the introduction of the Water Framework Directive, the relative importance of smaller waterways increased. This statement is particularly true for Hungary, where water-quality monitoring of most smaller rivers only began 12 years ago. Due to their large number, and the lack of historical data concerning their state, systematic monitoring is a challenge.

In the current study, 101 creeks are characterized on the one hand by 13 physico-chemical quality parameters (pH, electric conductivity, chloride ion concentration, dissolved oxygen, oxygen saturation, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, ammonium nitrogen, total inorganic nitrogen, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus), on the other hand by their watershed's relief, land use, and point sources' pollution indicators. Euclidean distance between water bodies (henceforth WBs) is calculated according to normalized physico-chemical monitoring values. They are grouped into clusters using the hierarchical clustering method. Watershed characteristics are used to explain the clustering via linear discriminant analysis.

The investigation revealed that the main driver of cluster group creation is related to human impact: diffuse agricultural and point-source pollution. The first of the three clusters involved water bodies with low or no human impact; the second cluster contained those with medium-level anthropogenic disturbance, while waters with high pollution values formed the third cluster. Mean distance between heavily polluted waters was 1.5 times higher than that between those showing no or low disturbance, meaning that pristine waters are more similar to one another than polluted ones. The current number of samples per river is twice as high in cluster 1 as in cluster 3, revealing that there is room for optimization of the monitoring system. This contribution uses Hungary as a case study.

Open access
Central European Geology
Authors: Ildikó Gyollai, Ákos Kereszturi and Elias Chatzitheodoridis

The study of shock-metamorphic features of the Zagami meteorite revealed pseudotachylite-like melt veins with inhomogeneous chemistry and schlieren structure of silica-glass and alkali feldspar melt glass. The feldspar occurs as diaplectic glass in the interstitial area indicating short-time (few seconds) quenching of shock pressure during the impact event, with post-shock annealing. At several locations, apatite needles were identified, which are formed by fluids (cold water with dissolved ions) after the crystallization of cumulate magmatic minerals. Phosphates also could form in impact melts due to circulation of fluids after the impact event. The other signature for the high shock temperature is the presence of Ca–Ti-rich pyroxenes and titanomagnetite, which indicate temperature above 1,200 °C. The formation of silica-rich melt in interstitial area has two scenarios: (a) fractional melting of the Martian crust or (b) formation by pseudotachylite-like impact melting. According to textural observations (schlieren pattern), we propose an impact origin of the large amount of silica-rich melt in this meteorite. Pseudotachylite-like textures were mentioned earlier in terrestrial impact craters; however, we first propose them to form in a Martian meteorite based on their similarity of texture with terrestrial pseudotachylites.

Open access

With the intent of making data acquisition for fractal geometry-based discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling time-efficient and automatized, a new method was established. For the automation of data retrieval from the images of the studied surfaces, a series of image-processing operations and MATLAB algorithms have been developed. The method allows the retrieval of more than 1,000 fracture-length data/cm2 of one sample in several minutes. This methodology tends to be a useful tool in studies of fracture network geometries. DFN models of a supposed excavated and/or environmental damage zone, designed with the use of data supplied by the above method, are presented in this work as an example.

Open access

Most cities in the world have experienced major developments in the past 20–25 years. However, research has showed that the development aspect of these cities has led to a decrease in green areas. This paper aims to assess the spatiotemporal variations of urban green areas during the period 1990–2015 with special regard to city of Erbil. The study uses a mix of fuzzy functions, linear spectral mixture analysis, and maximum likelihood classification for the classification of Landsat imagery from 1990 to 2015 to extract the four main classes of land use, namely agricultural land, vacant land, built-up land, and green vegetation. Both the classification approaches used in this research produced excellent and reliable results, as an overall accuracy of more than 80% was able to be obtained. The spatiotemporal analysis of land use within the city of Erbil shows a series of major changes between 1990 and 2015. Therefore, the results of the spatiotemporal evolution of urban greenness assessment in the Erbil region can be used both for spatial planning purposes and as an urban greenness assessment method in dry climate areas.

Open access
Central European Geology
Authors: Zsófia Pálos, István János Kovács, Dávid Karátson, Tamás Biró, Judit Sándorné Kovács, Éva Bertalan, Anikó Besnyi, György Falus, Tamás Fancsik, Martina Tribus, László Előd Aradi, Csaba Szabó and Viktor Wesztergom

The past decade has seen a great number of studies dealing with magmatic water contents and how these could be retrieved by the nominally anhydrous minerals’ (NAMs) trace structural hydroxyl (water) contents. Constraints have been made to magmatic hygrometry with clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Although results suggest that the method is more flexible and reliable than melt inclusion studies, they also indicate that the trace hydroxyl contents could still be overprinted by syn- and post-eruptive processes. Clinopyroxenes can hold more structural hydroxyl than plagioclases. A comprehensive review is presented with the inclusion of all published results so far to compile the available pieces of information. As a case study, micro-FTIR measurements are made of a representative set of plagioclase phenocrysts from the Börzsöny Mts. (Carpathian–Pannonian Region). The samples were selected to represent the progress of the volcanic activity in time and space, considering the petrologic and geochemical evolution of volcanic products in well-defined volcanostratigraphic positions. The syn- and post-eruptive cooling rate seems to have the greatest effect on water retention. This means that the systematic investigation of water in volcanic phenocrysts can contribute to distinguish the slowly and rapidly cooling parts of the volcanostratigraphic units.

Open access

The aim of this study is to identify the milestones of landscape evolution around the Ecse Mound (Karcag-Kunmadaras, Hortobágy National Park, Hungary) in the Holocene period by sedimentological and malacological analysis of strata underneath and within the body of the kurgan concerned, including that of the same characteristics of the artificially piled layers. An undisturbed core drilling was carried out and the sedimentological properties of both the mound and of the substrate baserock were revealed, analysis of which has been supported by three radiocarbon (AMS) measurements. The baserock formation during the last phase of the Ice Age, Middle and Upper Pleniglacial, and Late Glacial phases was followed by soil development in the Holocene, while the mound was constructed in two phases at the end of the Copper Age by the communities of the Pit Grave (Yamna or Ochre Grave) Culture. By publishing these preliminary data, it is also intended to draw attention to the need of focused research efforts by standardized methodology in kurgan research, in order to make the results of different studies consistent and comparable.

Open access

Many river banks throughout the world are prone to landslides; therefore, serious efforts are made to develop landslide early warning systems. This study presents a method by which the stability changes of the river banks can be continuously monitored; necessary measures can be taken in time to reduce the damage. The method was tested in Dunaszekcső (Hungary), where the high loess bank of the River Danube has been intensively moving since 2007. The tilts of the high bank were measured by two borehole tiltmeters. The connection between tilt values and the river- and groundwater-level variations was investigated by multivariable and moving window regression analyses on the basis of a 6-year-long observation from 2011 to 2016. The results show that increasing regression coefficients mean decreasing stability of the high river bank, so the developed method can be used for continuous supervision of the high bank stability. The method is also suitable for studying the causes of motion processes. Investigations showed clearly that the effect of groundwater table variations is two orders of magnitude higher than the water-level variations of the River Danube. In addition to the erosion of the river, various small tilts of the stable and unstable parts also contribute to the arising of new cracks in the stable part, decreasing its width.

Open access
Central European Geology
Authors: Máté Zsigmond Leskó, Richárd Zoltán Papp, Boglárka Anna Topa, Ferenc Kristály, Tamás Vigh and Norbert Zajzon

The Úrkút manganese ore deposit (Transdanubian Range, Hungary) is one of the largest manganese accumulations to be formed during the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. In the past 60 years, the area was investigated intensively. The core storage facility of the manganese mine had more than 20,000 sample pieces. Most of these samples have never been investigated. During this study, which is the first widespread clay mineral study in the footwall of the Úrkút manganese ore deposit, we investigated 40 samples from seven boreholes (footwall rocks, black/gray shales below and above the first ore bed, and manganese carbonate ores). Although previous studies assumed that smectite is associated only with the ore beds, our research revealed its appearance in the footwall (Pliensbachian) as well. Simultaneously, tripoli (the local name of completely bleached chert) can also be found in the footwall. Based on the investigated samples, a sharp geochemical difference was detected between Pliensbachian and Toarcian sediments. In this paper, we try to trace the relationship between the smectite content of the footwall and the ore bed and compare these results with the observed geochemical changes. Based on the new data, we assume that the ore accumulation was caused by a flow system (upwelling-controlled ore formation).

Open access

Energy and metals are essential resources in the 21st century and with the economic and technical development are more and more required. The fulfilling of these requirements leads to the need to produce both more ore and energy. Considering these goals, the project CHPM2030 (“Combined Heat, Power and Metal extraction”) was launched in January 2016, focused on the characterization of European mining regions that can be linked to both metal extraction and renewable energy production. The aim of this project is to convert ultra-deep metallic mineral formations into an “orebody-enhanced geothermal system” to co-produce energy and metals. This study will focus on two mining areas (Recsk in Hungary and Neves-Corvo in Portugal), considered CHPM2030 case studies, comparing them regarding mineral (ore) and geothermal potential in terms of heat-flow density values and their implication in temperatures in depth estimations. Especially, when it concerns geothermal energy, the surface demand is an important factor to consider, so wider studies are required.

Open access

The Mecsekalja Zone is a strike-slip fault zone that plays an essential role in the structural framework of South Transdanubia. The metamorphic and deformation history of the crystalline basement of the Mecsekalja Zone has been determined thus far based exclusively on a few surface outcrops and near-surface samples. The Szentlőrinc-1 (Sztl-1) well penetrated the shear zone at a depth of approximately 2 km and brought drilling chips from a 220-m-long section of the basement to the surface. The aim of this study is to reconstruct the metamorphic and deformation history of the Mecsekalja Zone along the Sztl-1 well using these tiny samples. These drilling chips consist of single mineral and rock pieces that are dominated by quartz grains. This study concentrates on the detailed analysis of quartz grains utilizing the physical conditions of metamorphic evolution as well as ductile and brittle deformation to determine the chemical composition and rheology of quartz. The evolution of the studied area can be determined by evaluating analytical data measured by Raman spectroscopy, LA-ICP-MS, and FTIR spectroscopy. These data suggest that the maximum temperature of the early regional metamorphism was 500–575 °C, the temperature of the subsequent ductile deformation was below 500 °C including recrystallization occurred between 400 and 475 °C. During the structural evolution of the study area, two independent, single deformation events occurred. The earlier ductile deformation event was followed by a brittle event through the reactivation of the former ductile shear zone. Our model is in accordance with previous results concerning the evolution of the Mecsekalja Zone, thus, the shear zone, with an identical evolution, can be extended toward the southwest at least to the Sztl-1 well.

Open access

The Late Valanginian–Early Hauterivian iron ore deposit and related formations at Zengővárkony (Mecsek Mts., South Hungary) provided a relatively rich microfauna of foraminifera, crustacean microcoprolites, and sponge spicules. Benthic foraminifera are recognized in decreasing abundance: Glomospira cf. gordialis (Jones and Parker 1860), Lenticulina sp., Spirillina sp., Nodosaria sp., Epistomina sp., and Trocholina sp. A Hedbergella sp. indicates the presence of planktonic foraminifera around the ore deposit. Besides this microfauna, sponge spicules (diactine-type criccorhabds and anactine-type rhax forms) are first recorded from this environment. Rock-forming quantities of various ichnospecies of crustacean microcoprolites are recorded. Favreina hexaochetarius, Palaxius tetraochetarius, and Palaxius decaochetarius isp. provided statistically evaluated quantities in thin sections, which point to a complete crustacean ichnofauna from juveniles to adults. Four different microfossil assemblages are recognized from the Apátvarasd Limestone Fm: (a) Glomospira-dominated foraminifer assemblage, (b) diverse crustacean microcoprolite assemblage dominated by Palaxius, (c) monotypic Favreina assemblage, and (d) diverse sponge-dominated assemblage. These assemblages are similar to that of the Recent Aegean Sea hydrothermal field communities. The remains of an undetermined crinoid from dissolved rock sample may indicate a vivid sea-bottom environment.

Open access

Assessing the uncertainty in reservoir performance is a necessary step during the exploration phase. To examine the uncertainty in flow response, a large set of realizations must be processed. There are several stochastic geostatistical algorithms capable of simulating multiple equiprobable realizations. Although these can show us the possible realities highlighting the spatial uncertainty, their handling is time- and CPU-consuming during the later processes, such as flow simulations. Consequently, only a small number of realizations can be post-processed in industrial practice. The purpose of this work is to develop a method, which will reduce the huge number of realizations in a way that the remaining ones retain the spatial uncertainty of a reservoir’s flow behavior, as would be demonstrated by a larger set of realizations. To solve this problem, ranking methods can be applied. Traditional ranking techniques, such as probability selection, are highly dependent on the applied static properties. In this paper, an alternative selection method is parameterized for measuring the pairwise dissimilarity between geostatistical models, with a distance function based on the hydrodynamic properties of the hydrocarbon reservoirs. The effectivity of the method is highly dependent upon the selected criteria. Thus, the distance function refers to the flow responses and allows visualizing the space of uncertainty through multidimensional scaling. A kernel transformation of the MDS data set is required to obtain a feature space where the K-means algorithm can discover non-linear structures in the basic data set. The final step of the method is the selection of the Earth models closest to the cluster centers. This tool allows for the selection of a subset of representative realizations, containing similar properties to the larger set.

Open access

In this study, the joint shear strength of low-strength Hungarian sandstones of different grain size and surface roughness was investigated. The direct shear tests along discontinuities were performed under constant normal load. Previously, the direct shear test basic rock mechanic parameters of the investigated intact rocks were determined, such as the UCS value. The goal of the investigation is to determine the effect of the surface properties, such as surface roughness, grain size, and surface quality, on the joint shear strength of Hungarian sandstones. The failure curves derived from the experimental results of direct shear tests under laboratory conditions, and the empirical results according to Barton and Choubey (1977) were compared.

Open access

Depth of reservoirs of Hungarian oil fields and related oil density data were collected from the database of the Hungarian Mineral Resource Inventory. The purpose of the investigation was to point out the correlation between oil density and reservoir depth in some of the Hungarian hydrocarbon productive regions. Oil density related to reservoir depth in a particular area is generally linked to the migration mechanism. Zala Basin trends show a different migration process regionally and locally; tertiary migration by overflow mechanism can be supposed for the latter case. In the case of the Szeged–Kiskunság region, locally and regionally, migration along carrier beds through semipermeable sediments is present, with faults playing a significant role. In the Nagykunság region, the migration processes are similar to those in Zala, but the presence of faults seems more important. At depths below 2,000 m, the Bihar region trends are similar to those of the Szeged–Kiskunság region. In the shallower zone, hydrodynamic effects are recognizable. In two studied regions, the Battonya–Pusztaföldvár High and the Hungarian Paleogene Basin, the density of crude oil data does not show any significant variability and trend. Biodegradation and water washing were recognizable in the depth sections shallower than 2,000 m below surface. In karstic reservoirs of the Zala Basin (Nagylengyel, Sávoly), alteration is presumed at greater depths due to the karst water flow. The presented results show several trends of oil migration in the explored areas, which can be used for future estimation of the hydrocarbon potential in the Hungarian part of the Pannonian Basin.

Open access

The aim of our research was to better understand the spectral characteristics of precipitation variability, because through infiltration, this is the most important source of groundwater recharge. To better understand the periodicity of the rainfalls, we used monthly and annual rainfall data. We examined precipitation time records over a 110-year period from two different cities in the Carpathian Basin, obtained from the Hungarian Meteorological Service. With discrete Fourier-transformation (DFT) and wavelet time series analysis, we defined local cycles and developed a forecast for the Debrecen area.

Using DFT, we calculated the time-period distributions (spectra) of monthly and annual rainfall data. Spectra from the annual rainfall data showed 16 dominant periods in Debrecen and 17 in Pécs. At the two stations, the most dominant cycles were 3.6 and 5 years, respectively; there were several other cycles locally present in the data sets. From the monthly data sets, several other periodic components were calculated locally and countrywide as well.

Using wavelet analysis, the time dependence of the cycles was determined in the 110-year data set for two Hungarian cities, Debrecen and Pécs.

Open access

This paper deals with a question: how many stochastic realizations of sequential Gaussian and indicator simulations should be generated to obtain a fairly stable description of the studied spatial process? The grids of E-type estimations and conditional variances were calculated from pooled sets of 100 realizations (the cardinality of the subsets increases by one in the consecutive steps). At each pooling step, a grid average was derived from the corresponding E-type grid, and the variance (calculated for all the simulated values of the pooling set) was decomposed into within-group variance (WGV) and between-group variance (BGV). The former was used as a measurement of numerical uncertainty at grid points, while the between-group variance was regarded as a tool to characterize the geologic heterogeneity between grid nodes. By plotting these three values (grid average, WGV, and BGV) against the number of pooling steps, three equidistant series could be defined. The ergodic fluctuations of the stochastic realizations may result in some “outliers” in these series. From a particular lag, beyond which no “outlier” occurs, the series can be regarded as being fully controlled by a background statistical process. The number of pooled realizations belonging to this step/lag can be regarded as the sufficient number of realizations to generate. In this paper, autoregressive integrated moving average processes were used to describe the statistical process control. The paper also studies how the sufficient number of realizations depends on grid resolutions. The method is illustrated on a computed tomography slice of a sandstone core sample.

Open access

Upon completion, the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Bátaapáti will provide safe storage for low- and medium-level radioactive waste. The emplacement chambers were excavated in a fractured, blocky, granitic rock mass approximately 240 m below surface. One of the tasks related to the repository development is the feasibility demonstration of the permanent repository closure, including long-term rock mass associated issues. The required lifetime exceeds the usual one of an engineering structure. The long-term behavior of the repository needs to be extrapolated from observation over a shorter time period, or from analogous natural caverns. Numerical methods are the most promising techniques to carry out the extrapolation. It is commonly understood that there are significant uncertainties in long-term predictions. Uncertainties can be mitigated by utilizing independent methods to assess long-term behavior and by improving the prediction capability of the calculation model in the short term. The aim of the paper is to: (1) create a numerical model to effectively capture a wide range of the observed behavior of the rock mass, including tunnel-excavation-induced stress change and stress-dependent permeability and (2) identify the possible cause of long-term creep and show that the long-term creep can be captured by the selected calculation method. The moderately fractured rock mass is modeled using the Universal Distinct Element Code, released by Itasca. The joints in the rock mass are explicitly modeled; the blocky nature of the rock mass is captured. The model is verified with actual field observations and monitoring results. Based on the predicted stress state of the rock mass, the potential cause of long-term creep is identified. By fulfilling the two aims explained above, it is concluded that the model can be used to extrapolate in time and serve as a possible estimation method for the long-term behavior of the repository.

Open access
Central European Geology
Authors: Ana Brcković, Monika Kovačević, Marko Cvetković, Iva Kolenković Močilac, David Rukavina and Bruno Saftić

Lithofacies definition in the subsurface is an important factor in modeling, regardless of the scale being at reservoir or basin level. In areas with low exploration level, modeling of lithofacies distribution presents a complicated task as very few inputs are available. For this purpose, a case study in the Požega Valley was selected with only one existing well and several seismic sections within an area covering roughly 850 km2. For the task of expanding the input data set for lithofacies modeling, neural network analysis was performed that incorporated interpreted lithofacies (sandstone, siltite, marl, and breccia-conglomerate) in a single well and attribute data gathered from a seismic section. Three types of different neural networks were used for the analysis: multilayer perceptron, radial-basis function, and probabilistic neural network. As a result, three lithofacies models were built alongside a seismic section based upon predictions acquired from the neural networks. Three lithofacies were successfully predicted on the section while the breccia-conglomerate was either missing or underpredicted and mostly positioned in a geologically invalid interval. Results obtained by single networks differed from one another, which indicated that a result from a single network should not be treated as representative; thus, the facies distribution for modeling should be acquired from either an ensemble of neural networks or several neural networks. Analysis showed the initial potential of the usability of neural networks and seismic attribute analysis on vintage seismic sections with possible drawbacks of the applications being pointed out.

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In the present explorative study, different time-series analysis methods, such as moving average, deterministic methods (linear trend with seasonality), and non-parametric Mann–Kendall trend test, were applied to monthly precipitation data from January 1871 to December 2014, with the aim of comparing the results of these methods and detecting the signs of climate change. The data set was provided by the University of Pannonia, and it contains monthly precipitation data of 144 years of measurements (1,728 data points) from the Keszthely Meteorological Station. This data set is special because few stations in Hungary can provide such long and continuous measurements with detailed historical background. The results of the research can provide insight into the signs of climate change in the past for the region of West Balaton. Parametric methods (linear trend and t-test for slope) for analyzing time series are the simplest ones to obtain insight into the changes in a variable over time. These methods have a requirement for normal distribution of the residuals that can be a limitation for their application. Non-parametric methods are distribution-free and investigators can get a more sophisticated view of the variable tendencies in time series.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Zsuzsanna Szabó, Nóra Edit Gál, Éva Kun, Teodóra Szőcs and György Falus

In worst-case leakage scenarios of CO2 geological storage, CO2 or brine may contaminate shallower drinking water aquifers. This work applies an advanced geochemical modeling methodology to predict and understand the effects of the aforementioned contamination scenarios. Several possibilities, such as equilibrium batch, kinetic batch, and 1D kinetic reactive transport simulations, were tested. These have all been implemented in the widely applied PHREEQC code. The production of figures and animations has been automated by R programming. The different modeling levels provide complementary information to each other. Both scenarios (CO2 or brine leakage) indicate the increase of ion concentrations in the freshwater, which might exceed drinking water limit values. The dissolution of CO2 changes the pH and induces mineral dissolution and precipitation in the aquifer and therefore changes in solution composition. Brine replacement of freshwater due to the pressure increase in the geological system induces mineral reactions as well.

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The Micro-Deval test method is used for testing of aggregate durability. The present paper focuses on two Hungarian andesites obtained from the quarries of Recsk (Mátra Mountains, Hungary) and of Nógrádkövesd (Cserhát Mountains, Hungary). The aim of this study is to find a simple test method based on the original Micro-Deval test method to assess the long-term durability of aggregates. An additional part of the research was to develop suitable mathematical models that can describe the behavior of the andesite aggregates under continuous abrasive impact. The relevant standard (EN 1097-1:2012) recommends 12,000 rotations to determine the Micro-Deval coefficient required for classification of the aggregates. Within the framework of this research, a modified Micro-Deval test was applied: the number of rotations was increased in several steps and the degree of abrasion was measured afterwards. Regression analyses were used to outline mathematical forms which characterize the dependence between the number of rotations and the degree of abrasion. According to the results, the long-term Micro-Deval tests significantly modify the assessed durability and thus provide information on the long-term abrasive impact. The degree of change depends on the studied material: the ratio of the long-term Micro-Deval coefficients of the two studied andesite types is larger than 3. The regression analyses of the measured Micro-Deval coefficients revealed that quadratic curves are suitable to describe these tendencies for both andesite aggregates.

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Central European Geology
Authors: János Haas, Tamás Budai, István Dunkl, Éva Farics, Sándor Józsa, Szilvia Kövér, Annette E. Götz, Olga Piros and Péter Szeitz

The 1,200-m-deep Budaörs-1 borehole provided important data for our understanding of the stratigraphy and tectonic setting of the southern part of the Buda Hills. Although previous reports contained valid observations and interpretations, a number of open questions remained. The importance of this borehole and the unsolved problems motivated us to revisit the archived core. The new studies confirmed the existing stratigraphic assignment for the upper dolomite unit (Budaörs Dolomite Formation) as the dasycladalean alga flora proved its late Anisian to Ladinian age assignment. An andesite dike was intersected within the Budaörs Dolomite. U–Pb age determination performed on zircon crystals revealed a Carnian age (~233 Ma), and settled the long-lasting dispute on the age of this dike, proving the existence of a Carnian volcanic activity in this area after the deposition of the Budaörs Dolomite. Palynostratigraphic studies provided evidence for a late Carnian to early Norian age of the upper part of the lower unit (Mátyáshegy Formation). This result verified an earlier assumption and reinforced the significance of the tectonic contact between the upper unit (Budaörs Formation) and the lower unit (Mátyáshegy Formation). Based on structural observations and construction of cross sections, two alternative models are presented for the structural style and kinematics of the contact zone between the Budaörs and Mátyáshegy Formations. Model A suggests a Cretaceous age for the juxtaposition, along an E–W striking sinistral transpressional fault. In contrast, model B postulates dextral transpression and an Eocene age for the deformation. The latter one is better supported by the scattered dip data; however, both scenarios are considered in this paper as possible models.

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The Late Cretaceous (Santonian) fish fauna of the Iharkút vertebrate site (Bakony Mountains, Hungary) is described here. The ichthyofauna includes the lepisosteid Atractosteus sp., the pycnodontid cf. Coelodus sp., Vidalamiinae indet., a non-vidalamiin Amiidae indet., Elopiformes indet., two indeterminate ellimmichthyiforms, cf. Salmoniformes indet., Acanthomorpha indet., at least one indeterminate teleostean, and numerous indeterminate actinopterygians (represented by teeth). Among these taxa, the Iharkút remains of Vidalamiinae and the suggested indeterminate Salmoniformes represent their first occurrence in the Late Cretaceous of Europe. The unidentifiable specimens may suggest the presence of further fish taxa. The gar remains described here further support the Atractosteus sp. affinity of the Iharkút form. Most of the Iharkút fishes are carnivorous, but durophagous taxa are also represented. Although chondrichthyan remains have not been identified in the Iharkút vertebrate material up to now, the ecological distribution of some local fish taxa presumes the possible vicinity of a marine–deltaic environment. Several Iharkút fish taxa are known from North American localities as well, suggesting that the Late Cretaceous European continental fish might have been more diverse and similar to that of North America than previously thought. The necessity of more intensive screen-washing at other European Late Cretaceous vertebrate sites is also emphasized.

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In this study, new microthermometric data of fluid inclusions distributed along planar assemblages crosscutting a metamorphic quartz lens from the Mecsekalja Zone metamorphic complex are presented. Three fluid generations are defined, none of which have previously been identified by earlier paleofluid evaluations of the study area. Petrographic description of the host quartz is provided to identify textures related to crystalloplastic deformation resulting from ductile deformation. The textural relationship of the studied assemblages to the dynamic recrystallization features is discussed. The possible affinities of the fluids introduced in this study to those identified in the region by previous authors are discussed. The affinities and timing of the fluid flow events are discussed based on the physicochemical properties of the fluids. One local carbonic (high XCO2) fluid is recognized. A high- and a moderate-salinity fluid generation are also revealed. The relationship of these fluid generations to those defined in earlier studies from the Mórágy Granite and the Baksa metamorphic complex contributes new knowledge to the recognition of the regional paleofluid evolution.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Ildikó Gyollai, Ákos Kereszturi, Zsolt Kereszty, Máté Szabó and Elias Chatzitheodoridis

Shock-driven annealing of pyroxene and shock deformation of olivine were analyzed in a recently found H chondrite called Csátalja. The most characteristic infrared (IR) spectral shape of shock-annealed sub-grained pyroxene was identified: the strongest peak occurs at 860 cm−1 with a smaller shoulder at 837−840 cm−1, and small bands are at 686, 635−638, and 1,044−1,050 cm−1. The appearance of forbidden bands in pyroxene and shift of band positions to a lower wave number in olivines clearly demonstrate the crystal lattice disordering due to shock metamorphism. The shock annealing produced mixed dark melt along fractures, which consists of feldspar−pyroxene and olivine−pyroxene melt. The dark shock melt at sub-grain boundaries of shocked pyroxenes and along fracture of pyroxenes is characterized by elevated Ca, Na, and Al content relative to its environment, detected by element mapping. So far, shock deformation of pyroxene and olivine was not studied by IR spectroscopy; this method has turned out to be a powerful tool in identifying the mixed composition of shock melt minerals. Further study of shock annealing of minerals, together with the context of shock melting at sub-grain boundaries, will provide a better understanding of the formation of high P–T minerals.

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Finding the optimal number of realizations to represent the model uncertainty when applying stochastic approaches is still a relevant question in geostatistics. The essence of the method is to visualize the realizations in a suitably constructed attribute space. To construct this space, the static connectivity metrics of the realizations were used. Within this framework, the creation of new realizations can be regarded as a sampling process, in which each new stochastic image is the equivalent of a new sampling point in the attribute space. The sampling process begins with the first few realizations appearing in a dispersed manner in random parts of the attribute space. The addition of more realizations causes the gradual emergence of higher point densities, which in the end, results in a point structure where most of the points are located in areas of high point densities with areas of low point densities surrounding them. High point densities represent typical realizations showing very similar connectivity characteristics, whereas low point densities correspond to atypical realizations with stronger deviations from the bulk. In this sense, reaching the optimal number of realizations is the equivalent of reaching a state in the sampling process where high- and low point densities are present at the same time, yet high point densities do not dominate the overall structure of the attribute space, as they also reflect the redundancy of the information content. This desired structure is strongly analogous to the complete spatial randomness of spatial point processes, where the points are neither dispersed nor aggregated in space. Based on this analogy, the normalized version of Ripley’s K-function and the L-function for the spatial inhomogeneous Poisson point process was applied to find the optimal number of realizations. The method is illustrated on a computed tomography slice and on the real-life data of the Tisza-2 reservoir.

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As a result of several years of screen-washing activity, a remarkable assemblage of eggshell fragments has been recovered from the Late Cretaceous vertebrate locality of Iharkút, Hungary. Detailed investigation of the assemblage by multiple visualization techniques (scanning electron microscopy, polarizing light microscopy, X-ray micro-computed tomography), quantitative morphometric analyses, and micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry revealed a diverse composition of five different eggshell morphotypes (MT IMT V) and three subcategories within the second morphotype (MT II/a, b, c), with MT I being by far the most abundant (83%) in the assemblage. MT I, MT III, and MT V represent theropod dinosaurian eggshells, whereas MT II and MT IV show characteristics of crocodilian and squamate eggshells, respectively. Hence, despite their fragmentary nature, these eggshells represent the first clear evidence that various sauropsid taxa had nesting sites near the ancient fluvial system of Iharkút. Besides the implied taxonomic diversity, two unique features add to the significance of this eggshell assemblage. First, it contains the thinnest rigid crocodilian (MT II/c) and squamate (MT IV) eggshells ever reported. Moreover, one of the identified theropod morphotypes, MT I, is also among the thinnest fossil dinosaurian eggshells, the thinness of which is only rivalled by the eggshells of the smallest Mesozoic avian eggs known to date. Second, the Iharkút eggshell assemblage consists exclusively of thin eggshells (≤300 µm), a condition unknown from any other fossil eggshell assemblages described to date. Combined with the knowledge acquired from skeletal remains, these peculiarities give additional insights into the paleoecology of the terrestrial sauropsid fauna once inhabiting the ancient island of Iharkút. Finally, the presence of well-preserved eggshells recovered from two different sites representing different depositional environments provides further evidence for previous taphonomic and sedimentological conclusions, and also expands our knowledge of the special conditions that allowed the preservation of these delicate eggshell fragments.

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The mineralized complex of Rudabánya hosts deposits of several mineral resources including base metal ores. Recent exploration provided new information on the enrichment of copper within this complex. The primary copper mineralization consists of sulfides. The paragenetic sequence starts with fahlore, continues with bornite, and concludes in chalcopyrite formation partly replacing the former phases. It is hosted by brecciated carbonate rocks, overprinting the paragenesis of the iron metasomatism. It was found to be spatially separated from zinc and lead enrichments. Oxidation and a subsequent new pulse of mineralization formed several new copper, zinc, and lead minerals, probably by the remobilization of the primary parageneses.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Attila Demény, Alexandra Németh, Zoltán Kern, György Czuppon, Mihály Molnár, Szabolcs Leél-Őssy, Mihály Óvári and József Stieber

Determination of the long-term behavior of cave systems and their response to changing environmental conditions is essential for further paleoclimate analyses of cave-hosted carbonate deposits. For this purpose, four actively forming stalagmites were collected in the Baradla Cave where a three-year monitoring campaign was also conducted. Based on textural characteristics and radiocarbon analyses, the stalagmites are composed of annual laminae, whose counting was used to establish age–depth relationships. Fast and slowly growing stalagmites have different stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions as well as trace element contents that could be attributed to differences in drip water migration pathways. The stable isotope compositions were compared with meteorological data of the last ∼100 years indicating that carbon isotope compositions of the stalagmites may reflect changes in precipitation amount, while oxygen isotope compositions are more related to temperature variations. The combined textural–geochemical–meteorological interpretation lead us to select the isotope record that can best reflect variations in environmental conditions and can be used for further evaluation of the climate–proxy relationships.

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Anisian Muschelkalk carbonates of the southern Germanic Basin containing silicified ooidal grainstone are interpreted as evidence of changing pH conditions triggered by increased bioproductivity (marine phytoplankton) and terrestrial input of plant debris during maximum flooding. Three distinct stages of calcite ooid replacement by silica were detected. Stage 1 reflects authigenic quartz development during the growth of the ooids, suggesting a change in the pH–temperature regime of the depositional environment. Stages 2 and 3 are found in silica-rich domains. The composition of silica-rich ooids shows significant Al2O3 and SrO but no FeO and MnO, indicating that late diagenetic alteration was minor. Silicified interparticle pore space is characterized by excellent preservation of marine prasinophytes; palynological slides show high abundance of terrestrial phytoclasts. The implications of our findings for basin dynamics reach from paleogeography to cyclostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy, since changes in the seawater chemistry and sedimentary organic matter distribution reflect both the marine conditions as well as the hinterland. Basin interior changes might overprint the influence of the Tethys Ocean through the eastern and western gate areas. Stratigraphically, such changes might enhance marine flooding signals. Ongoing research needs to address the complex interaction between an intracratonic basin and an open-ocean system by comparing local and regional biotic and abiotic signals.

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Central European Geology
Authors: István Vető, Katalin Báldi, Stjepan Ćorić, Magdolna Hetényi, Attila Demény and István Futó

This study is intended to clarify the depositional environment of a 180-m-thick, immature, limy Middle Miocene oil source rock interval, cored in the Zala Basin, western Hungary. For this purpose, a highly interdisciplinary approach was applied combining simple, standard micropaleontological, isotopic, and organic geochemical methods, rarely applied together. Foraminifera were studied for estimating bottom oxygenation and water depth, while nannoplankton biostratigraphy permitted for estimating the rate of sedimentation. The studied source rocks were deposited in a rather shallow sea, below well-oxygenated bottom water. The abundant epiphytic foraminiferal fauna proves that the bottom was densely inhabited by benthic algae, while the high δ13Corg (>–22‰) clearly indicates massive benthic algal contribution to the kerogen. Mass accumulation rate of the limy upper part of the NN5 nannoplankton biozone, the oil source interval included, was very high (551 t/m2/Ma). In spite of moderate productivity and good oxygenation of the bottom, rapid accumulation of carbonate, produced partly by benthic algae, assured both the great relative weight of the marine organic components and their good preservation. Our results provide the first proof for the possibility of a major contribution of benthic algae to oil-prone kerogen.

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The pre-Cenozoic basement of central Hungary is partly made up of different types of carbonate rocks. These carbonates are often good hydrocarbon reservoirs, and hydrocarbon production is significant in this region in Hungary. Nonetheless, the petrography of the reservoir rocks has not yet been investigated in detail. In this study, the results of the investigations of the lithology of a carbonate hydrocarbon reservoir from central Hungary (Gomba Field) are presented. Based on this work, two types of pure limestone, a dolomitic limestone and a polymictic breccia, could be distinguished in the study area. The limestone types are similar to the Kisfennsík Limestone Member and the Berva Limestone of the Bükk Mountains, but they contain significant amounts of framboidal pyrite and dead oil as vein fillings. The breccia is predominantly composed of angular carbonate clasts and minor metamorphic and sedimentary rock fragments in a chaotic pattern. The breccia has some grains that may be speleothems (e.g., stalactite or stalagmite) based on their structure and isotopic compositions. The fabric of the breccia suggests that it may have been formed by fluid-related processes. Cross-cutting relationships of the veins and petrography of the vein fillings suggest that there are four different fracture generations and two different hydrocarbon migration phases to be distinguished. The composition of the hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions related to the second migration event is similar to the crude oil currently produced from the Gomba Field. During the Eocene, the Triassic basement was buried and brecciated. Subsequently, a primary hydrocarbon migration can be assumed, but the hydrocarbons became overmature, apparently due to the high temperatures of the burial environment. Finally, an uplift phase began and the youngest fracture generation formed, which serves as a primary pathway for the more recent hydrocarbon migration.

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Mantle peridotites are interpreted as either residues after partial melting and melt extraction or products of igneous refertilization of refractory peridotites. The simple distinction between these models is difficult to assess because in chemical variation diagrams, both processes lead essentially to the same results. The only exception is the Ti-in-Cpx versus Ti-in-whole-rock plots, which can successfully discriminate between these models. In this study, a modified version of Ti-in-Cpx versus Mg#-in-olivine plots was applied to ∼1,500 spinel peridotite xenoliths from worldwide localities. The results showed that the vast majority of shallow mantle samples are consistent with the partial melting model; however, a minority of samples may indicate refertilization of formerly refractory mantle domains.

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The Zagros Orogenic Belt includes the Fold and Thrust Belt, the High Zagros Belt, the Outer Zagros Ophiolitic Belt, the Sanandaj–Sirjan Metamorphic Belt, the Inner Zagros Ophiolitic Belt, and the Urumieh–Dokhtar Magmatic Belt. We divide the High Zagros evolutionary history into five stages: (1) triple junction formation, (2) continental lithosphere rifting, (3) generation, spreading, and maturation of the Neotethys Ocean, (4) subduction of the oceanic lithosphere, and (5) collision. The Neotethys triple junction, located at the southeastern corner of the Arabian Plate, formed during the Late Silurian–Early Carboniferous. Subsequently, this triple junction became a rift basin due to normal faulting and basalt eruption. The rifting stage occurred during the Late Carboniferous–Early Permian. Thereafter, extension of the basin continued, leading to spreading and maturation of the Neotethys oceanic basin during the Late Permian–Late Triassic. Probably at the end of the Late Triassic, closure of the Paleotethys Basin caused the initiation of two northeastward subductions: (1) oceanic–oceanic and (2) oceanic–continental. Oceanic–oceanic subduction continued until the Late Cretaceous and was terminated by the emplacement of the Outer Zagros Ophiolites, whereas oceanic–continental subduction continued until the Middle Miocene. Subduction in the southern Neotethys Basin between the Arabian and Central Iran Plates caused a tensional regime between Sanandaj–Sirjan and Central Iran, and the formation of a back-arc basin that by its closing led to the emplacement of the Inner Zagros Ophiolites during the Late Cretaceous.

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Stone masonry arch bridges in North Hungary represent cultural heritage values. For the maintenance and preservation of these bridges detailed mapping of lithologies and weathering forms are required. The purpose of this paper is to present the identified lithotypes, their conditions (weathering grade) and their petrophysical properties by using in situ lithological mapping, documentation of weathering forms, non-destructive tests and laboratory analyses. Furthermore these analyses demonstrate the difficulties of characterization and diagnostics of the historical construction materials. Additionally the results of condition assessments and the properties of the four different dimension stones from four different sites provide examples for the large dissimilarities regarding the strength parameters. The above-listed parameters are required as input data for stability calculations and modeling of these structures.

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The paper provides information on the mechanical properties of granitic rocks that were subjected to heat. Two types of granitic rocks were tested under laboratory conditions at temperatures of 23 °C, 300 °C and 600 °C. The granitic rock from Bátaapáti (Mórágy Granite) is a pinkish leucocratic monzogranitic type while the second type is grey granite from Mauthausen (Austria). The samples were placed in furnace and temperature raised to 300 °C. Other set of samples were heated to 600 °C. Mechanical tests were performed on non-heated and heated samples and the test results were compared. Heating to 300 °C caused a slight increase in the uniaxial compressive strength and in indirect tensile strength, with reference to the samples kept at 23 °C. A drastic drop in both values was observed when samples were heated to 600 °C. The density of the samples did not show a major change up to 300 °C. On the contrary, a decrease in ultrasonic pulse velocity was observed, with an additional significant loss when samples subjected to 600 °C were compared to the reference samples of 23 °C. This decrease can be related to the initiation of micro-cracks. With increasing temperature the Young modulus of both granites was reduced.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Imre Czinkota, János Szanyi, Balázs Kovács, András Sebők, Ildikó Hajdok and Márton Papp

This paper aims at determining the behavior of thermal water brought to surface and how this might impact reinjection wells and the rock during reinjection. The biggest problem is that reinjection wells are predisposed to choking. We searched for a method to examine this process, including a model for physico-chemical changes in the water—rock interaction. Two different samples of powdered rock (designated α and β) were analyzed using thermal water samples from production and reinjection wells. The pH shows significant differences between the samples from wells where free water treatment was carried out, and those from the aerated thermal waters, as well as for the rock sample. Basically, a decrease in sediment volume can be obtained by increasing the pH. The salt effect was more coherent. Its result was an interesting case of W-shaped graphs from the producing well. On the other hand there is virtually no difference between the samples with acid titration.

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This article evaluates the known rare earth elements (REE), Ti and Li occurrences and exploration potential in Finland, based on existing data combined with new geochemistry and mineralogy, heavy mineral studies, geophysical measurements, geologic mapping and recent drilling of new targets.

The potential rock types for REE include carbonatite (Sokli, Korsnäs), alkaline rocks (Otanmäki, Lamujärvi, and Iivaara), rapakivi granite and pegmatite (Kovela), and kaolin-bearing weathering crusts in eastern and northern Finland. The highest REE concentrations occur in late magmatic carbonatite veins in the fenite area of the Sokli carbonatite complex. Detailed mineralogical investigations have revealed three distinct types of REE mineralization as phosphates, carbonates and silicates in the studied areas. Mineralogical and mineral chemical evidence demonstrates that hydrothermal processes are responsible for the REE mineralization in the studied rocks and confirms that such processes are predominant in the formation of REE minerals in carbonatite, calc-silicate rocks and albitite. Titanium occurs as ilmenite in hard rock deposits in Paleoproterozoic subalkaline mafic intrusions. The Otanmäki ilmenite was mined together with vanadium-rich magnetite from 1953 to 1985 from a small gabbro—anorthosite complex, which still contains potential for Ti resources. Other major ilmenite deposits are within the Koivusaarenneva ilmenite gabbro intrusion and Kauhajärvi apatite—ilmenite—magnetite gabbro complex. Possible Ti resources are included in Ti-magnetite gabbro of the large layered mafic intrusions in northern Finland, such as at the former Mustavaara vanadium mine. For several years, Rare Element (RE)-pegmatite of the Kaustinen and Somero—Tammela areas has been the objective of Li exploration by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK). At Kaustinen, Li-pegmatite occurs as subparallel dyke swarms in an area of 500 km2 within Paleoproterozoic mica schists and metavolcanic rocks. Li pegmatite contains more than 10% spodumene as megacrysts (1–10 cm), albite, quartz, K-feldspar, muscovite and accessory minerals such as columbite-group minerals, apatite, tourmaline, beryl, Fe-oxide minerals and garnet. The Kaustinen spodumene pegmatite and Somero—Tammela petalite—spodumene pegmatite contain potential Li resources for the battery industry in EU countries.

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Magma/wet sediment interaction (e.g. autobrecciation, magma-sediment mingling, hyaloclastite and peperite-forming, etc.) is a common phenomenon, where hot magma intrudes into unconsolidated or poorly consolidated water saturated sediment. In the Eastern Borsod Basin (NE-Hungary) relatively small (2–30 m) subvolcanic bodies, sills and dykes with contact lithofacies zones were found generated by mechanical stress and quenching of the magma, and interacting with unconsolidated wet andesitic lapilli-tuff and tuff-breccia. Close to the contact between sediment and intrusions, thermal and mechanical effects may occur in the host sediment. Hydrothermal alteration and stratification of the host sediment were developed only locally along the contact zone, probably due to the paleo-hydrogeologic and paleo-rheological inhomogeneities of the lapilli-tuff–tuff-breccia deposits. Processes of magma/wet sediment interaction may be difficult to recognize because of limited exposure and/or certain similarities of the brecciated intrusions to the characteristics of the host sediment; hence detailed field work (geologic mapping or profiling) was required to demonstrate the subvolcanic origin of the brecciated andesite bodies.

Open access
Central European Geology
Authors: Arnold Gucsik, Tasuku Okumura, Hirotsugu Nishido, Ildikó Gyollai, Kiyotaka Ninagawa, Natalie Deseta and Péter Rózsa

Quartz grains from the Ries impact structure containing shock-induced microstructures were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy in cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL), secondary electron (SEM-SE) and back-scattered electron (SEM-BSE) modes as well as Mott–Seitz analysis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the mechanism by which CL detects Planar Deformation Features (PDFs) in quartz, which is one of the most important indicators of shock metamorphism in rock-forming minerals. PDFs are micron-scale features not easily identified using optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The CL spectrum of PDFs in quartz that has suffered relatively high shock pressure shows no or a relatively weak emission band at around 385 nm, whereas an emission band with a maximum near 650 nm is observed independent of shock pressure. Thus, the ~385 nm intensity in shocked quartz demonstrates a tendency to decrease with increasing shock metamorphic stage, whereas the 650 nm band remains fairly constant. The result indicates that the emission band at 385 nm is related to the deformed structure of quartz as PDFs.

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One of the most important ores for REE mineralization are iron oxide–apatite (IOA) deposits. The Posht-e-Badam Block (PBB) is a part of the Central Iranian geostructural zone which is the host of most important Fe deposits of Iran. Exploration studies of the IOA deposits within the PBB (e.g. Esphordi, Gazestan, Zarigan, Lak-e-Siah, Sechahoun, Chahgaz, Mishdovan, Cheshmeh Firouzi and Shekarab) demonstrate that these deposits contain high contents of REE. Concentrations of ΣREE in the most important IOA deposits of the PBB include the following: the Esphordi deposit varies between 1.2 and 1.88%, the Gazestan deposit between 0.17 and 1.57%, the Zarigan deposit between 0.5 and 1.2% and the Lak-e-Siah deposit varies between 0.45 and 1.36%. Concentrations of ΣREE within the apatite crystals present within the IOA ores in the Esphordi, Lak-e-Siah and Homeijan deposits have ranges between 1.9–2.54%, 1.9–2.16% and of 2.55%, respectively. These elements are mainly concentrated in apatite crystals, but other minerals such as monazite, xenotime, bastnasite, urtite, alanite, thorite, parisite–synchysite and britholite have been recognized as hosts of REEs, as small inclusions within the apatite crystals, and in subsequent carbonate, hematite–carbonate and quartz veins and veinlets. Given the extent of this block and the presence of several IOA deposits within this block, and also the high grades of REEs within these deposits, one can reasonably state that it is obvious that there are significant resources of REEs in this part of Iran.

Open access
Central European Geology
Authors: Ádám Bede, Roderick B. Salisbury, András István Csathó, Péter Czukor, Dávid Gergely Páll, Gábor Szilágyi and Pál Sümegi

The Ecse-halom is a burial mound (kurgan) in the Hortobágy region of Hungary. Built in the Late Copper Age/Early Bronze Age by nomadic people from the east, it now stands on the border between two modern settlements. A road of medieval origin runs along this border and cuts deeply into the body of the mound. The southern half of the mound was plowed and used as a rice field, and later a military observation tower was built on top of it. Despite this disturbance, the surface of the mound is in decent condition and provides a home for regionally significant, species-rich loess steppe vegetation. The mound comprises two construction layers as indicated by magnetic susceptibility and thin-section micro-morphological analysis. Examination of organic compounds and carbonate content at various levels showed different values, which suggest a variety of natural and anthropogenic stratigraphic layers. Mid-sized siltstone fraction is dominant in the section. The layers originate from the immediate vicinity of the mound, but have different characteristics than present-day soils. These mounds contain a valuable record of cultural and environmental conditions occurring at the time of their construction, and also serve as a refuge for ancient loess vegetation; therefore their conservation is highly recommended.

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Sideritic—kaolinitic and green clay layers were previously reported from the Mecsek Mountains (SW Hungary) as indicators of Tethyan volcanism in the otherwise germanotype Middle Triassic succession. The aim of the present study is to provide a review and a critical re-evaluation of the previously published data on both the sideritic—kaolinitic layers (the so-called “Mánfa Siderite”) and the green clay layers. New results of mineralogical investigation of the green clay layers are also presented. The Middle Triassic volcanic origin of the “Mánfa Siderite” cannot be confirmed. In addition to a possible volcanic contribution, the sideritic—kaolinitic layers were probably formed in a freshwater swamp under humid, tropical climatic conditions, whereby weathering in an organic-rich, acidic environment led to the formation of “underclays” and siderite in the coal-bearing formations of Late Triassic to Early Jurassic age. These layers were probably tectonically placed over Middle Triassic carbonates. The illitic green clay layers intercalated in the Middle Triassic dolostone may represent terrigenous deposits, and the illite mineralogy probably is the result of burial diagenesis of detrital clays.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Ildikó Gyollai, Ildikó Gyollai, Szaniszló Bérczi, Krisztián Fintor, Szabolcs Nagy and Arnold Gucsik

The Mócs chondrite was studied by optical microscopy, element mapping, as well as scanning electron microscope backscattered electron (SEM—BSE) imaging, in order to gain a better understanding of the thermal metamorphic as well as post-shock annealing evolution and the mineralogical signatures in this meteorite. The studied thin section of Mócs meteorite contains 26 chondrules with a variety of chondrule textures, which are characterized by a blurry rim. The chondrules mostly consist of pyroxene and olivine, whereas feldspars occur only in the recrystallized groundmass, chondrule mesostasis, and mineral melt inside and beyond the shock veins. It was found that the matrix was completely recrystallized. According to the scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations mentioned above, it can be concluded that the Mócs chondrite is a 6.5 petrographic type.

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Knowledge of the distribution and sorption characteristics of trace metals in soils is essential because of their importance both from agricultural and environmental point of view. In this paper, an overview will be provided on the relationship between the behavior and sorption properties of Cu and Pb as well as major soil characteristics, based on the results obtained by several independent research projects carried out on this field at the Institute for Geological and Geochemical Research over the last 15 years. These projects were accomplished using methods with different approaches, e.g. studying metal characteristics by total metal content, selective chemical extractions and batch sorption experiments.Our results show that both metals can be found in soils, primarily in the form of phases highly resistant to weathering. However, if they are mobilized, they are easily and strongly immobilized by soils rich in organic matter, with higher affinity for Cu than for Pb. In acid soils, on the other hand, the leaching of Cu is expected to be higher from such horizons when compared to Pb, especially when iron oxides, which immobilize Pb preferentially, are also present in these horizons. In mineral horizons the close association of Pb and iron oxides can be still expected, whereas Cu prefers to be bound both by clay minerals and iron oxides. In alkaline soils, however, precipitation of both metals as carbonates is a general feature. Our results obtained through different approaches presented in this paper were found to be effectively complementary to each other, providing a much deeper insight into soil-metal interaction than when they are used independently.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Vladimir Naumov, Vladimir Kovalenker, Gheorghe Damian, Sergei Abramov, Maria Tolstykh, Vsevolod Prokofiev, Floarea Damian and Ioan Seghedi
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High concentration of naturally-occurring arsenic in groundwater poses a significant risk to human health if this water is a drinking water resource. Chronic arsenic ingestion has been linked mainly to skin cancer, and a wide variety of non-cancer health impacts. Research conducted in Hungary shows that there is an excessive risk of arsenic-related diseases in populations consuming water that exceeds the 10 microgram/liter limit value. It is therefore important to understand the significance of reduction of arsenic concentration in drinking water and the size of the exposed population.

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A field experiment with microelement loads was set up on loamy-textured, calcareous chernozem soil formed on loess. The ploughed layer contained about 5% CaCO3 and 3% humus. The soil was well supplied with Ca, Mg, Mn and Cu, moderately supplied with N and K, and weakly supplied with P and Zn. The water table is at the depth of 15 m, the water-balance of the area is negative, and the site is drought-sensitive. Salts of the 13 examined microelements were applied at 4 levels in the spring of 1991.Treatments were arranged in split-plot design, in a total of 104 plots with two replications. Loading rates were 0, 90, 270 and 810 kg/ha per elements in the form of AlCl3, NaAsO2, BaCl2, CdSO4, K2CrO4, CuSO4, HgCl2, (NH4)6Mo7O24, NiSO4, Pb(NO3)2, Na2SeO3, SrSO4, and ZnSO4. Soil profiles of the control and the 810 kg/ha treatment were sampled in the 3rd, 6th and 10th year of the trial. The mixed samples, consisting of 5 cores/plot, were taken every 30 cm to the depth of 60 (1993), 90 (1996) and 290 (2000) cm. NH4-acetate + EDTA-soluble element content was determined. The scheme for vertical movement of soluble elements in soil profile as a function of time is shown in Fig. 1. The main conclusions of the study can be drawn as follows:

  1. 1. On contaminated soil with 810 kg/ha loading rates, As, Hg, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ba and Sr displayed no significant vertical movement. The movement of these elements is blocked in the soil-plant system: their accumulation in the above-ground plant parts usually remains below 5–10 mg/kg D.M., with the exception of Ba and Sr which showed a somewhat higher accumulation. On this soil the above elements do not seem to be dangerous contaminants either to soil, groundwater or plants. Extreme As and Hg loads, however, resulted in phytotoxicity in some plants.
  2. 2. Moderate extent of leaching occurs in the case of Zn and Cd, when they are enriched significantly. Their accumulation was moderate in the above-ground plant parts. Zn is not a dangerous pollutant either for soil, plants or groundwater at this site. Cd, however, is a very dangerous element from the human toxicological point of view and more extreme Cd loads also proved to be toxic for soil life, crops yield and quality.
  3. 3. Cr, Se, and Mo (in the form of chromate, selenate and molybdenate anions) exhibited great mobility in the soil and partly in the soil-plant system. Cr was hardly detectable in the above-ground floral parts. Its rapid leaching, however, can jeopardize groundwater quality. Se showed hyperaccumulation in all plant organs with high toxicity for all kind of crops. Mo also showed two or three orders of magnitude greater accumulation in plant parts, resulting in products unfit for animal or human consumption. Under our experimental conditions Cr(VI), Se, Mo can be classified as dangerous contaminants, since the anion forms remained stabile for a long time in this well-aerated calcareous environment.

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Central European Geology
Authors: Ubul Fügedi, László Kuti, Daniella Tolmács, Ildikó Szentpétery, Barbara Kerék, Tímea Dobos, András Sebők and Rita Szeiler

South of the Sudetes and Tatra Mountains young sediments contain more of almost all micro- and mesoelements than those to the north of the Carpathian Mountains, which were covered by ice during the Late Pleistocene. As detailed investigations show this larger unit is a collection of many individual geochemical regions, among which there are four on the area of Hungary: the region of soil calcification in the central part of Hungary, the slope debris of the foothills of the Eastern Alps, the floodplains of the rivers of Eastern Hungary that are contaminated with the waste material of heavy industry, and the rest of the country. No general geochemical background can be given to the whole; the background value intervals for each element shall be given for each geochemical region separately. In Eastern Hungary, where those rivers flow that originate from the heavy industrial centers of Transylvania and Slovakia, the toxic elements can locally exceed the limit value. In the central part of the country, however, the micro-elements are frequently found below the minimum concentration required, since a carbonate accumulation zone develops above the groundwater level and the carbonate minerals contain low amounts of nutrient elements.

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The aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between soil properties and potentially toxic element contents of arable soils based on the dataset of the Soil Information and Monitoring System in Hungary. Nine potentially toxic elements (As, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) were compared with selected soil parameters. We carried out grouping of related soil properties by principal component analysis. The method was suitable to describe the relationship within groups of the soil properties. We studied correlations of the resulting components and potentially toxic elements. The change of Ni content was influenced by the physical properties of the soil (e.g. clay content, field capacity, R = 0.67). Boron is the only one of the examined elements that indicates significant positive correlation with saline-alkali (R = 0.21) parameters. Zn, Co and Cr behaved very similarly; their correlation with components 1 and 2 were the closest.

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Central European Geology
Authors: István Zsámbok, Anita Andó, László Kuti and András Sebők

The birth of urban geologic maps (which are considered environmental-geologic themed maps) and the progress in development of their content and design were driven by the growing importance of addressing environmental problems, and the increasing complex utilization of urban areas. Therefore, MÁFI and, since 2012, the MFGI Department of Environmental Geology, have prepared a series of maps for the local authorities of Budapest. These maps usually focus on the problems of urban planning from the viewpoint of geology, hydrogeology, and water chemistry, and as experience shows, they prove to be excellent tools in decision-making processes. This paper examines the chemical content of groundwater, which is one of the main indicators of the state of the environment. According to the everyday experience of the authors it is very useful to understand the state of both quality and quantity of subsurface and surface water. In a recent series of research work we measured the zinc, copper, boron and arsenic level of the groundwater in 10 districts of Budapest.

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