Author:
János Kállai Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Magatartástudományi Intézet
Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Bölcsészettudományi Kar, Pszichológiai Intézet, Személyiség- és Egészségpszichológia Tanszék

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The increased interest in health care- and educational activities carried out in virtual reality (VR) brought about the need to discuss certain psychological frameworks of interpretation concerning VR. My summary relies on special literature and partly on our own research work. It aims to define special terms such as immersion and presence that concentrates on presenting those mental models of VR, which comprise components of spatial representation. The overview introduces the concept of multisensory coherence, conscious being there, attachment to and detachment from the digital world, and different forms of affordances. In the Application chapter I primarily present a few of those VR-based processes that may be more widely applied in the future in health care and education in Hungary as well. The interest in digital education and health service has its own contradictions. There are fears that the personal contact between medical practitioners and clients or teachers and students will be lost. On the other hand, there is an increasing demand for the introduction of new methodologies, thus dialogues are inevitable. The more reliable and efficient application of the new processes may bear considerable mental and financial changes. I hope that my presentation will widen the demands concerning the application of digital technologies, and will draw attention on the need to establish technological and disciplinal infrastructure, which, after critical analysis, is able to alter certain – now contradictional – educational and health care processes. Introducing new VR methodologies should be a joint venture of research and practice.

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2022  
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not indexed
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Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.127
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Psychology (miscellaneous) (Q4)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0,3
Scopus
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General Psychology 199/209 (5th PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
0.124

2021  
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Total Cites
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not indexed
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without
Journal Self Cites
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5 Year
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Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,117
Scimago Quartile Score Psychology (miscellaneous) (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0,3
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Psychology 200/209 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,366

2020  
Scimago
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7
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,142
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Psychology (miscellaneous) Q4
Scopus
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17/111=0,2
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General Psychology 199/203 (Q4)
Scopus
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0,079
Scopus
Cites
53
Scopus
Documents
24
Days from submission to acceptance 116
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2019  
Scimago
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6
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0,139
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Psychology (miscellaneous) Q4
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24/103=0,2
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General Psychology 192/204 (Q4)
Scopus
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0,113
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35
Scopus
Documents
14
Acceptance
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58%

 

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