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  • 1 Crop Production Institute, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, H-2100, Gödöllő, Páter Károly u. 1., Hungary
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Abstract

Fusarium spp. are phytopathogens causing fusarium head blight in wheat. They produce mycotoxins, mainly fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone. The study was conducted during two growing seasons (2020 and 2021) at the experimental field and laboratories of the Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences (MATE). The aim of the study was to determine the influence of growing season, nitrogen fertilisation, and wheat variety on Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production in wheat kernel. Zearalenone was not detected during the two growing seasons and deoxynivalenol was only detected in 2020. The results indicate that nitrogen fertilisation and wheat variety did not have statistically significant influence on Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production. The growing season had statistically significant influence on Fusarium infection and fumonisins production due to higher rainfall in 2021 compared to 2020 during the flowering period when the wheat spike is the most vulnerable to Fusarium infection.

Abstract

Fusarium spp. are phytopathogens causing fusarium head blight in wheat. They produce mycotoxins, mainly fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone. The study was conducted during two growing seasons (2020 and 2021) at the experimental field and laboratories of the Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences (MATE). The aim of the study was to determine the influence of growing season, nitrogen fertilisation, and wheat variety on Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production in wheat kernel. Zearalenone was not detected during the two growing seasons and deoxynivalenol was only detected in 2020. The results indicate that nitrogen fertilisation and wheat variety did not have statistically significant influence on Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production. The growing season had statistically significant influence on Fusarium infection and fumonisins production due to higher rainfall in 2021 compared to 2020 during the flowering period when the wheat spike is the most vulnerable to Fusarium infection.

1 Introduction

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most cultivated crops around the world. It is grown across a wide range of environments. The primary use of wheat is for bread making. In addition, it is used in the production of bakery and confectionery products, animal feed, and ethanol. The genus Fusarium is a plant pathogen of wheat. It causes fusarium head blight (FHB), a major fungal disease in wheat production (Sifuentes dos Santos et al., 2013). Initial symptoms of FHB appear on the spike and grain. FHB reduces the quality of the grain and might decrease the yield up to 70%. Wheat is particularly susceptible to FHB infection during the period of anthesis and the early stages of grain development. Diseased grains are shrivelled, discoloured, and lightweight (Goswami and Kistler, 2004). Under favourable conditions, Fusarium species can produce mycotoxins, mainly deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), and fumonisins (FUM).

The presence of mycotoxins in food and feed can cause chronic or acute mycotoxicosis in animals and humans (Bottalico and Perrone, 2002). Deoxynivalenol (DON), commonly known as vomitoxin, causes food refusal, diarrhea, alimentary haemorrhaging, and contact dermatitis (Bennett and Klich, 2003). Zearalenone (ZEA) has estrogenic effects and reduces the reproductive capability of domestic animals (Biagi, 2009; Stanković et al., 2012). Fumonisins (FUM) are carcinogenic mycotoxins causing hepatotoxicity and apoptosis of the liver. In humans, it is linked with esophageal cancer (Marasas, 2001).

To minimise the risk of FHB and mycotoxins, some preventive measures should be applied to reduce their occurrence. The application of integral wheat protection measures such as cultivation of resistant cultivars, crop rotation, tillage, and application of appropriate fertilisers and fungicides can significantly reduce wheat infection by Fusarium species (Lemmens et al., 2004).

2 Materials and methods

The experiment was conducted during two growing seasons (2020 and 2021) at the experimental field and laboratories of the Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences (MATE), Crop Production Institute, Gödöllő, Hungary. The experimental site is in a hilly area with a close to average climatic zone of the country (47°35′40.8″N 19°22′08.4″E, 210 m above sea level).

The soil type of the experimental field is brown forest soil (Chromic Luvisol). Prior to sowing, the field was cleared, ploughed, rotor-tilled, and the seedbed was prepared. The plots were sown and harvested with plot machines. The trial design was that of a split-plot with main plots consisting of different wheat varieties and subplots consisting of different nitrogen doses. Main plots and subplots were 50 cm apart horizontally and 30 cm apart vertically, and the area of each subplot was 5 m2. Each treatment had three replications. The wheat varieties used were: Alföld, Mv Kolompos, and Mv Karéj. Nitrogen fertiliser (NH4NO3) was applied twice during the growing season, the first application was done at tillering stage and the second application at heading stage. The doses of nitrogen in the first application were: 40, 80, and 120 kg N ha−1. In the second application 40 kg N ha−1 was added only. Plots without nitrogen topdressing were used as control. Fusarium percentage was calculated by counting the number of colonies that formed on wheat kernels disinfected with a solution of pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) and chloramphenicol (100 kernels from each treatment) incubated for 7 days under laboratory conditions on Nash and Snider Fusarium selective medium (distilled water 1 L, peptone 15 g, KH2PO4 1 g, MgSO47H2O 0.5 g, agar 20 g, PCNB 1 g, chloramphenicol 100 ppm). Mycotoxin concentrations of deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), and fumonisins (FUM) were analysed using ROSA FAST 5 Quantitative Test by Charm Sciences.

For the statistical evaluation of the results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) module of the IBM SPSS V.21 software at 5% significance level with subsequent Tukey's test was performed to determine the influence of growing season, nitrogen fertilisation and wheat variety on Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production in wheat kernel.

3 Results and discussion

The study of the influence of growing season, wheat variety, and nitrogen fertilisation on Fusarium infection and subsequent mycotoxin production in wheat kernel was carried out in 2020 and 2021. The growing season significantly affected Fusarium infection (F = 187.31, P = 0.000) and fumonisins concentration (F = 4.7, P = 0.03) but did not significantly affect deoxynivalenol concentration (F = 3.61, P = 0.06) (Figs 1 and 2, Table 2). Fusarium infection was higher in 2021 (93.1%) than in 2020 (46.9%) (Fig. 1). Zearalenone was not detected throughout the two growing seasons. Fumonisins concentration (total mean = 22.2 ppb) was higher than that of deoxynivalenol (total mean = 15.97 ppb) (Table 1). Deoxynivalenol was not detected in 2021, its concentration was 31.9 ppb in 2020 (Fig. 2). Fumonisins concentration was higher in 2021 (30.6 ppb) than in 2020 (13.9 ppb) (Fig. 2). Rainfall (mm) measurements were collected from the Hungarian National Meteorological Service during the flowering period (May) when wheat is most susceptible to Fusarium infection. Rainfall during the flowering period (May) in 2021 was 123.1 mm, higher than in 2020 (39.8 mm), this increase in rainfall could explain the increased Fusarium percentage and fumonisins concentration.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Effect of growing season on Fusarium percentage (%)

Citation: Acta Alimentaria 51, 2; 10.1556/066.2022.00036

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Effect of growing season on mycotoxin concentration (ppb)

Citation: Acta Alimentaria 51, 2; 10.1556/066.2022.00036

Table 1.

Descriptive statistics of Fusarium percentage (%), DON and FUM concentration (ppb) affected by growing season, wheat variety, and nitrogen dosage (kg N ha−1)

MeanStd. deviationStd. errorMinimumMaximum
Growing seasonFusarium202046.8619.313.221290
202193.066.111.0276100
Total69.9627.263.2112100
DON202031.94100.8216.80500
202100000
Total15.9772.598.550500
FUM202013.8922.713.79050
202130.5640.146.690200
Total22.2233.453.940200
Wheat varietyFusariumAlföld64.8830.276.1822100
Kolompos72.0025.195.1422100
Karéj73.0026.505.4112100
Total69.9627.263.2112100
DONAlföld25.00103.2121.070500
Kolompos8.3340.828.330200
Karéj14.5861.6412.580300
Total15.9772.598.550500
FUMAlföld22.9225.455.19050
Kolompos12.5022.124.51050
Karéj31.2546.199.430200
Total22.2233.453.940200
Nitrogen dosageFusarium069.3928.176.6412100
40+4070.3329.216.8922100
80+4066.4428.546.7322100
120+4073.6724.795.842496
Total69.9627.263.2112100
DON027.78117.8527.780500
40+4016.6770.7116.670300
80+4016.6751.4512.130200
120+402.7811.792.78050
Total15.9772.598.550500
FUM016.6729.707.000100
40+4019.4425.085.91050
80+4033.3348.5111.430200
120+4019.4425.085.91050
Total22.2233.453.940200

0: no nitrogen application.

40 + 40: the first nitrogen application was 40 kg N ha−1 and the second was 40 kg N ha−1.

80 + 40: the first nitrogen application was 80 kg N ha−1 and the second was 40 kg N ha−1.

120 + 40: the first nitrogen application was 120 kg N ha−1 and the second was 40 kg N ha−1.

The wheat variety did not significantly affect Fusarium infection (F = 0.63, P = 0.54) and subsequent mycotoxin production (DON, F = 0.32, P = 0.73; FUM, F = 1.94 P = 0.15) (Table 2).

Table 2.

Analysis of variance for Fusarium percentage and DON, FUM concentrations affected by growing season, wheat variety, and nitrogen dosage

Source of variationSum of SquaresdfMean SquareFSig.
Growing seasonFusariumBetween Groups38410.68138410.68187.310.00
Within Groups14354.1970205.06
Total52764.8871
DONBetween Groups18368.06118368.063.610.06
Within Groups355763.89705082.34
Total374131.9471
FUMBetween Groups5000.0015000.004.70.03
Within Groups74444.44701063.49
Total79444.4471
Wheat varietyFusariumBetween Groups942.2502471.130.630.54
Within Groups51822.62569751.05
Total52764.87571
DONBetween Groups3402.77821701.390.320.73
Within Groups370729.167695372.89
Total374131.94471
FUMBetween Groups4236.11122118.061.940.15
Within Groups75208.333691089.98
Total79444.44471
Nitrogen dosageFusariumBetween Groups478.153159.380.210.89
Within Groups52286.7268768.92
Total52764.8871
DONBetween Groups5659.7231886.570.350.79
Within Groups368472.22685418.71
Total374131.9471
FUMBetween Groups3055.5631018.520.910.44
Within Groups76388.89681123.37
Total79444.4471

df: degree of freedom; Sig.: significance; Significance level = P < 0.05.

The nitrogen fertilisation did not significantly affect Fusarium infection (F = 0.21, P = 0.89) and subsequent mycotoxin production (DON, F = 0.35, P = 0.79; FUM, F = 0.91, P = 0.44) (Table 2).

In our study, the different climatic conditions that prevailed during 2020/2021 could be the reason for the increase in Fusarium percentage and fumonisins concentration. According to Brennan et al. (2003), the development of FHB in wheat depends on rainfall. Bryła et al. (2016) also stated that the development, growth, and spread of Fusarium fungi and the degree of infection strongly depend on rainfall. Mesterházy et al. (1999) pointed out that climatic conditions may play an important role in Fusarium infection of wheat. González et al. (2008) suggested that the relatively high level of natural Fusarium contamination could be due to a high rainfall period that occurred during the flowering stage. Risk of FHB in wheat plants depends also on genetically determined resistance of the given wheat cultivar to Fusarium spp. (Zhang et al., 2008). According to these authors, the main factors affecting Fusarium contamination of wheat were weather conditions and susceptibility of wheat cultivars to Fusarium spp.

In our study, nitrogen dosage did not influence Fusarium contamination and mycotoxin production. Krnjaja et al. (2015) found that nitrogen fertilisation did not increase FHB intensity. Kuzdraliński et al. (2014) reported that the rate of autumn N fertilisation did not affect the number of Fusarium detections.

Bernhoft et al. (2012) concluded that farming system (organic versus conventional) impacted Fusarium infestation, and that organic management tended to reduce Fusarium contamination and mycotoxins. However, Fusarium infestation and mycotoxin concentrations may be influenced by a range of factors such as local topography and local climate. Oldenburg et al. (2007) concluded that nitrogen rates of up to 240 kg N ha−1 did not influence Fusarium growth and their production of mycotoxins in wheat grains. According to Parry et al. (1995), the impact of nitrogen fertilisation on Fusarium infestation remains unclear. Moreover, Aufhammer et al. (2000) concluded that nitrogen fertilisation did not stimulate Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production. In addition, Martin et al. (1991) observed that nitrogen rates increasing from 70 to 170 kg N ha−1 significantly increased the occurrence of Fusarium infected grains in wheat. According to Lemmens et al. (2004), increasing nitrogen fertilisation rates up to 80 kg N ha−1 significantly affected Fusarium infection and subsequent mycotoxin contamination in wheat. However, Lemmens et al. (2004) concluded that the occurrence of Fusarium spp. could not be solely based on the nitrogen input in crop production. All these results suggest that the effect of nitrogen fertilisation can only partially influence the creation of favourable conditions for the occurrence of Fusarium spp.

4 Conclusions

Growing season, nitrogen fertilisation and wheat variety were studied to evaluate Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production in wheat kernel. The results indicate that nitrogen fertilisation and wheat variety did not show statistically significant influence on Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production. The growing season showed statistically significant influence on Fusarium infection and fumonisins production due to higher rainfall in 2021 compared to 2020 during the flowering period when the wheat spike is the most vulnerable to Fusarium infection.

Acknowledgment

This research was supported by the Doctoral School of Plant Science of the Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The PhD students involved were sponsored by the Stipendium Hungaricum scholarship. The authors would like to express thanks to all colleagues and technical staff on-site and in laboratories for their assistance and valuable contribution to the implementation of this study.

References

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    • Crossref
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    • Export Citation
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bennett, J.W. and Klich, M. (2003). Mycotoxins. Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 16: 497516. https://doi.org/10.1128/CMR.16.3.497-516.2003.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bernhoft, A. , Torp, M. , Clasen, P.E. , Løes, A.K. , and Kristoffersen, A.B. (2012). Influence of agronomic and climatic factors on Fusarium infestation and mycotoxin contamination of cereals in Norway. Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment, 29: 11291140. https://doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2012.672476.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Biagi, G. (2009). Dietary supplements for the reduction of mycotoxin intestinal absorption in pigs. Biotechnology in Animal Husbandry, 25: 539546. https://doi.org/10.2298/BAH0906539B.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bottalico, A. and Perrone, G. (2002). Toxigenic Fusarium species and mycotoxins associated with head blight in small-grain cereals in Europe. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 108: 611624. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1020635214971.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brennan, J.M. , Fagan, B. , van Maanen, A. , Cooke, B.M. , and Doohan, F.M. (2003). Studies on in vitro growth and pathogenicity of European Fusarium fungi. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 109: 577587. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1024712415326.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bryła, M. , Waśkiewicz, A. , Podolska, G. , Szymczyk, K. , Jędrzejczak, R. , Damaziak, K. , and Sułek, A. (2016). Occurrence of 26 mycotoxins in the grain of cereals cultivated in Poland. Toxins, 8(6): 160. https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins8060160.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • González, H.H.L. , Moltó, G.A. , Pacin, A. , Resnik, S.L. , Zelaya, M.J. , Masana, M. , and Martínez, E.J. (2008). Trichothecenes and mycoflora in wheat harvested in nine locations in Buenos Aires province, Argentina. Mycopathologia, 165: 105114. https://doi.org/10.1007/S11046-007-9084-X.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goswami, R.S. and Kistler, H.C. (2004). Heading for disaster: Fusarium graminearum on cereal crops. Molecular Plant Pathology, 5(6): 515525. https://doi.org/10.1111/J.1364-3703.2004.00252.X.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Krnjaja, V. , Mandić, V. , Lević, J. , Stanković, S. , Petrović, T. , Vasić, T. , and Obradović, A. (2015). Influence of N-fertilization on Fusarium head blight and mycotoxin levels in winter wheat. Crop Protection, 67: 251256. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.CROPRO.2014.11.001.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kuzdraliński, A. , Szczerba, H. , Tofil, K. , Filipiak, A. , Garbarczyk, E. , Dziadko, P. , Muszyńska, M. , and Solarska, E. (2014). Early PCR-based detection of Fusarium culmorum, F. graminearum, F. sporotrichioides and F. poae on stem bases of winter wheat throughout Poland. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 140: 491502. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10658-014-0483-9.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lemmens, M. , Haim, K. , Lew, H. , and Ruckenbauer, P. (2004). The effect of nitrogen fertilization on Fusarium head blight development and deoxynivalenol contamination in wheat. Journal of Phytopathology, 152(1): 18. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1439-0434.2003.00791.x.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Marasas, W.F.O. , Miller, J.D. , Riley, R.T. , and Visconti, A. (2001). Fumonisins occurrence, toxicology, metabolism and risk assessment, In: Summerell, B.A. , Leslie, J.F. , Backhouse, D. , Bryden, W.L. , and Burgess, L.W. (Eds.), Fusarium. Paul E. Nelson memorial symposium. APS Press, St. Paul, Minn. pp. 332359.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Martin, R.A. , MacLeod, J.A. , and Caldwell, C. (1991). Influences of production inputs on incidence of infection by Fusarium species on cereal seed. Plant Discipline, 75: 784788.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mesterházy, Á. , Bartók, T. , Mirocha, C.G. , and Komoróczy, R. (1999). Nature of wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight and the role of deoxynivalenol for breeding. Plant Breeding, 118: 97110. https://doi.org/10.1046/J.1439-0523.1999.118002097.X.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Oldenburg, E. , Bramm, A. , and Valenta, H. (2007). Influence of nitrogen fertilization on deoxynivalenol contamination of winter wheat - experimental field trials and evaluation of analytical methods. Mycotoxin research, 23: 712. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02946018.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Parry, D.W. , Jenkinson, P. , and McLeod, L. (1995). Fusarium spike blight (scab) in small grain cereals review. Plant Pathology, 44(2): 207238. https://doi.org/10.1111/J.1365-3059.1995.TB02773.X.

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  • Sifuentes dos Santos, J. , Souza, T.M. , Ono, E.Y.S. , Hashimoto, E.H. , Bassoi, M.C. , Miranda, M.Z. de , Itano, E.N. , Kawamura, O. , and Hirooka, E.Y. (2013). Natural occurrence of deoxynivalenol in wheat from Paraná State, Brazil and estimated daily intake by wheat products. Food Chemistry, 138: 9095. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.09.100.

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  • Stanković, S. , Lević, J. , Ivanović, D. , Krnjaja, V. , Stanković, G. , and Tančić, S. (2012). Fumonisin B1 and its co-occurrence with other fusariotoxins in naturally contaminated wheat grain. Food Control, 23: 384388. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.FOODCONT.2011.08.003.

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  • Zhang, J.X. , Jin, Y. , Rudd, J.C. , and Bockelman, H.E. (2008). New fusarium head blight resistant spring wheat germplasm identified in the USDA National Small Grains Collection. Crop Science, 48: 223235. https://doi.org/10.2135/cropsci2007.02.0116.

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The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: András Salgó

Co-ordinating Editor(s) Marianna Tóth-Markus

Co-editor(s): A. Halász

       Editorial Board

  • L. Abrankó (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)
  • D. Bánáti (University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • J. Baranyi (Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK)
  • I. Bata-Vidács (Agro-Environmental Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • J. Beczner (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • F. Békés (FBFD PTY LTD, Sydney, NSW Australia)
  • Gy. Biró (National Institute for Food and Nutrition Science, Budapest, Hungary)
  • A. Blázovics (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • F. Capozzi (University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)
  • M. Carcea (Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics Rome, Italy)
  • Zs. Cserhalmi (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • M. Dalla Rosa (University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)
  • I. Dalmadi (Szent István University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • K. Demnerova (University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • M. Dobozi King (Texas A&M University, Texas, USA)
  • Muying Du (Southwest University in Chongqing, Chongqing, China)
  • S. N. El (Ege University, Izmir, Turkey)
  • S. B. Engelsen (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)
  • E. Gelencsér (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • V. M. Gómez-López (Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Murcia, Spain)
  • J. Hardi (University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia)
  • K. Héberger (Research Centre for Natural Sciences, ELKH, Budapest, Hungary)
  • N. Ilić (University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia)
  • D. Knorr (Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany)
  • H. Köksel (Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey)
  • K. Liburdi (Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy)
  • M. Lindhauer (Max Rubner Institute, Detmold, Germany)
  • M.-T. Liong (Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia)
  • M. Manley (Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa)
  • M. Mézes (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)
  • Á. Németh (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • P. Ng (Michigan State University,  Michigan, USA)
  • Q. D. Nguyen (Szent István University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • L. Nyström (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)
  • L. Perez (University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain)
  • V. Piironen (University of Helsinki, Finland)
  • A. Pino (University of Catania, Catania, Italy)
  • M. Rychtera (University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • K. Scherf (Technical University, Munich, Germany)
  • R. Schönlechner (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria)
  • A. Sharma (Department of Atomic Energy, Delhi, India)
  • A. Szarka (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • M. Szeitzné Szabó (National Food Chain Safety Office, Budapest, Hungary)
  • S. Tömösközi (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • L. Varga (University of West Hungary, Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary)
  • R. Venskutonis (Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania)
  • B. Wróblewska (Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences Olsztyn, Poland)

 

Acta Alimentaria
E-mail: Acta.Alimentaria@uni-mate.hu

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2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
856
Journal Impact Factor 1,000
Rank by Impact Factor Food Science & Technology 130/143
Nutrition & Dietetics 81/90
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,941
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,039
Journal Citation Indicator 0,19
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Food Science & Technology 143/164
Nutrition & Dietetics 92/109
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
30
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,235
Scimago Quartile Score

Food Science (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1,4
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Food Sciences 222/338 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,387

 

2020
 
Total Cites
768
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
0,650
Rank by
Nutrition & Dietetics 79/89 (Q4)
Impact Factor
Food Science & Technology 130/144 (Q4)
Impact Factor
0,575
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year
0,899
Impact Factor
Journal
0,17
Citation Indicator
 
Rank by Journal
Nutrition & Dietetics 88/103 (Q4)
Citation Indicator
Food Science & Technology 142/160 (Q4)
Citable
59
Items
Total
58
Articles
Total
1
Reviews
Scimago
28
H-index
Scimago
0,237
Journal Rank
Scimago
Food Science Q3
Quartile Score
 
Scopus
248/238=1,0
Scite Score
 
Scopus
Food Science 216/310 (Q3)
Scite Score Rank
 
Scopus
0,349
SNIP
 
Days from
100
submission
 
to acceptance
 
Days from
143
acceptance
 
to publication
 
Acceptance
16%
Rate
2019  
Total Cites
WoS
522
Impact Factor 0,458
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,433
5 Year
Impact Factor
0,503
Immediacy
Index
0,100
Citable
Items
60
Total
Articles
59
Total
Reviews
1
Cited
Half-Life
7,8
Citing
Half-Life
9,8
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00034
Article Influence
Score
0,077
% Articles
in
Citable Items
98,33
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,04267
Average
IF
Percentile
7,429
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,212
Scopus
Scite Score
220/247=0,9
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Food Science 215/299 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,275
Acceptance
Rate
15%

 

Acta Alimentaria
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 1100 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
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Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 754 EUR / 944 USD
Print + online subscription: 872 EUR / 1090 USD
Subscription fee 2023 Online subsscription: 776 EUR / 944 USD
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Acta Alimentaria
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1972
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia    
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0139-3006 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2535 (Online)

 

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Jun 2022 0 72 53
Jul 2022 0 7 5