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  • 1 National Collection of Agricultural and Industrial Microorganisms, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, , Somlói út 14–16, H-1118, Budapest, , Hungary
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Abstracts

Zygosaccharomyces species are among the most problematic food spoilage yeasts. The two most infamous species are Zygosaccharomyces balii and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, although they may also take a positive role during the production of some fermented foods. DNA sequence based yeast identification aided by freely available reference databases of barcoding DNA sequences has boosted the description rate of novel yeast species in the last two decades. The genus Zygosaccharomyces has been considerably expanded as well. Especially the number of the extremely osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces species, related to Z. rouxii and regularly found in high-sugar foods, has enlarged. A brief account of recent developments in the taxonomy and biodiversity of this important food associated genus is given in this review.

Abstracts

Zygosaccharomyces species are among the most problematic food spoilage yeasts. The two most infamous species are Zygosaccharomyces balii and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, although they may also take a positive role during the production of some fermented foods. DNA sequence based yeast identification aided by freely available reference databases of barcoding DNA sequences has boosted the description rate of novel yeast species in the last two decades. The genus Zygosaccharomyces has been considerably expanded as well. Especially the number of the extremely osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces species, related to Z. rouxii and regularly found in high-sugar foods, has enlarged. A brief account of recent developments in the taxonomy and biodiversity of this important food associated genus is given in this review.

1 Introduction

Humans unknowingly and inadvertently daily ingest large populations of viable yeast cells by consuming different kind of foods and beverages. Significant amount of viable yeast cells are harboured e.g. in fresh fruits, fruit juices, salads, cheeses and other fermented dairy products, fermented meet products, alcoholic beverages, and traditional fermented foods (Fleet and Balia, 2006). Yeasts are introduced to foods and beverages deliberately as starter cultures, or unintentionally by the food ingredients or during the production, packaging, and transportation of foods. According to Fleet (2006), their significance in food and beverage production can be classified as follows: “production of fermented foods and beverages, production of ingredients and additives of food processing, spoilage of foods and beverages, biocontrol of spoilage microorganisms, probiotic and biotherapeutic agents, source of food allergens, and source of opportunistic, pathogenic yeasts”. The biodiversity of yeasts in foods can be investigated by culture-based and culture-independent methods. The application of culture-independent methods revealed a number of hitherto unknown microorganisms in naturally fermented foods (Tamang et al., 2016). However, the application of culture-based methods is irreplaceable in cases when the behaviour of microorganisms in food matrices is to be investigated.

By the end of the previous millennium the sequences of the D1/D2 domain of nuclear rRNA gene for practically all yeast species known at that time were determined and guidelines for species delimitation were provided for ascomycetous (Kurtzman and Robnett, 1998) and basidiomycetous (Fell et al., 2000) yeast species as well. Although, unlike with the whole fungal kingdom (Schoch et al., 2012), in case of yeasts the D1/D2 domain of large subunit (LSU) nuclear rRNA gene has become the primary barcoding region, the DNA sequence of the ITS region, in itself or in combination with D1/D2 sequence has also increasingly been utilised for yeast identification. The application of DNA sequencing and the availability of freely accessible reference DNA sequence databases have provided unprecedented accuracy and rapidity of yeast identification. In addition to aiding identification, DNA barcode sequence comparisons also facilitate revealing novel yeast species. As a result the tempo of yeast species description has been accelerated in the last two decades, which was already reflected in the number of species (1,265) treated in the latest edition of the Yeasts, a Taxonomic Study (Kurtzman et al., 2011). Currently the number of known yeast species exceeds 2,000 (Boekhout et al., 2021). This boom of the number of yeast species has also affected foodborne yeasts. Due to their preservative resistance, osmotolerance, and strong fermentative ability, Zygosaccharomyces species are undoubtedly the most problematic spoilage yeasts encountered in food and drinks industries (James and Stratford, 2003). The aim of this review is to summarise the developments during the last ten years in the taxonomy and biodiversity of Zygosaccharomyces, a genus with prominent significance to food industry.

2 Zygosaccharomyces in the latest edition of the yeasts, a taxonomic study – the status quo

In the 5th edition of the Yeasts, a Taxonomic Study, six Zygosaccharomyces species were treated (James and Stratford, 2011), while the authors became aware of an additional one, Zygosaccharomyces machadoi, too late for inclusion in their contribution. On the basis of their physiological characters, the species were assigned to three sub-groups (numbering by me) as follows. Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Zygosaccharomyces bisporus are characterised by extreme resistance to weak-acid food preservatives (1); Zygosaccharomyces lentus and Zygosaccharomyces combuchaensis show preference for slow growth at cooler temperatures (2), while Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Zygosaccharomyces mellis exhibit extreme osmotolerance (3). The two most infamous species among them are Z. bailii and Z. rouxii. Z. bailii is resistant to sorbic and benzoic acids and sulphur dioxide at levels permitted in food industry and is a notorious spoilage yeast of several foods and beverages including soft drinks, fruit juices and concentrates, wines, ciders, tomato sauce, salad dressing, and mayonnaise. Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is among the microorganisms capable of growing at low water activities down to 0.62 at least under a set of other environmental conditions. As a result of this remarkable property, it may cause spoilage of high-sugar foods and drinks, including honey and fruit juice concentrates (Pitt and Hocking, 2009). Some frequent isolation sources of Zygosaccharomyces species are shown in Table 1. Bold characters indicate the species not treated by James and Stratford (2011).

Table 1.

Common isolation sources of Zygosaccharomyces species

Species*Isolation sourceReference
Z. bailiiGrape must, Italy; wine, France; Swiss wine yeast; cloudy wine, South Africa; apple juice, mayonnaise and vinegar containing products, The Netherlands; vinegar, Spain; sour red wine, USA; Brazilian orange juice concentrate; sorghum-brandy mash; Worcester sauce; lees of pear must; honey; Institute of Brewing, Tokyo; sweet pickle, UK; salad cream; grape and blackcurrant juiceBarnett et al. (2000); James and Stratford (2011)
Z. bisporusTea-beer fungus, Java; fermenting cucumbers, USABarnett et al. (2000); James and Stratford (2011)
Z. faviBee bread, polyfloral honey, HungaryČadež et al. (2015)
Z. gambellarensisSweet white wine, Veneto region, ItalyTorriani et al. (2011)
Z. kombuchaensisKombucha tea, Russia, USAJames and Stratford (2011)
Z. lentusSpoiled orange juice, UK; spoiled orange squash; spoiled tomato ketchup, UK; spoiled pear and blackcurrant squash drink, IrelandJames and Stratford (2011)
Z. machadoiGarbage pellets of a stingless bee Tetragonisca angustula in BrazilRosa and Lachance (2005)
Z. mellisAlpechin, Spain; honey, Italy, USA, Canada; wine grapes, Germany; syrup containing root ginger, strawberry juiceBarnett et al. (2000); James and Stratford (2011)
Z. osmophilusSugar, Mauritius; honey, and larval food of bees (Scaptotrigona cfr. bipunctata and T. angustula) in BrazilKreger-van Rij (1966); Matos et al. (2020)
Z. parabailiiImported citrus concentrate, The Netherlands; citrus paste, The Netherlands; salad dressing, USASuh et al. (2013)
Z. pseudobailiiWorcestershire sauce, Japan; pickle relishSuh et al. (2013)
Z. rouxiiConcentrated black grape must, Italy; wine, fermenting jam and bonbon of bitter orange syrup, France; wine grapes, Germany; Portuguese white wine; salted beans, The Netherlands; raw cane sugar; pineapple jam; wort; dates, Tunisia; ginger cake, marzipan, candied fruit, salted beans and molasses, The Netherlands; malt extract, UK; pickles, miso, sweat cream cake, Japan; marmalade, Belgium; Cuban molasses; fermenting cucumbers and maple syrup, USA; honey, Canada; cane sugar, maize, soya product, apple jelly, soy sauce, soft drinksBarnett et al. (2000); James and Stratford (2011)
Z. sapaeTraditional balsamic vinegar, ItalySolieri et al. (2013)
Z. seideliiFlowers, MaldivesBrysch-Herzberg et al. (2020)
Z. siamensisHoney, ThailandSakhincai et al., (2012)

*Species not treated by James and Stratford (2011) are marked with bold characters.

Although names of Zygosaccharomyces species, first of all Z. rouxii and Z. bailii, are mostly emerging in context of food spoilage, they also can exert beneficial effects during the production of some foods. For example Z. rouxii significantly contributes to the formation of aroma compounds during soy sauce fermentation (Devanthi and Gkatzionisand, 2019) and converts the sugars available in cooked grape must to ethanol, the substrate for acetic acid bacteria during the production of balsamic vinegar. In the latter case, Z. rouxii may be accompanied by other yeasts including further Zygosaccharomyces species (Solieri and Giudici, 2008). Z. rouxii has also been considered as starter culture for low-alcohol or alcohol-free beer (reviewed by Michel et al., 2016) and baking yeast (Boboye et al., 2008), while Z. bailii plays a positive role during kombucha fermentation by producing ethanol, which is subsequently converted to acetic acid by bacteria (Solieri, 2021).

3 The current stage of the genus Zygosaccharomyces

The genus Zygosaccharomyces has considerably been expanded in the last decade. The phylogenetic relationships among the currently recognised members of the genus deduced from the partial DNA sequences for the gene coding the large subunit (LSU) nuclear rRNA is depicted in Fig. 1. Species not treated by James and Stratford (2011) are indicated with bold characters. While no further species were added to group 2 comprising Z. lentus and Z. combuchaensis, two novel species closely related to Z. bailii (group 1) were described, and the group of extremely osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces species (group 3) has significantly been enlarged. A brief compendium of the Zygosaccharomyces species not treated in the latest edition of the Yeast, a Taxonomic Study is provided below.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Phylogenetic relationships among the currently recognised Zygosaccharomyces species determined from analysis of LSU rRNA gene D1/D2 domain. Bar, 1% nucleotide sequence divergence. Evolutionary analysis was conducted in MEGA6 (Tamura et al., 2013)

Citation: Acta Alimentaria 2022; 10.1556/066.2021.00142

3.1 Zygosaccharomyces parabailii and Z. Pseudobailii

The comparison of barcoding DNA regions of several yeast strains maintained as Z. bailii revealed the existence of two groups characterised by DNA sequences divergent from the corresponding sequences of Z. bailii as well as from each other. The divergent regions included the nuclear rRNA gene cluster (partial LSU and ITS), as well as some protein-coding gens; β-tubulin, EF-1α, RPB1, and RPB2. Although the investigated mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA and COXII) were not variable enough to distinguish the two above-noted groups and Z. bailii, the two groups were interpreted as two distinct species and Zygosaccharomyces parabailii and Zygosaccharomyces pseudobaillii were proposed for them (Suh et al., 2013). The isolation sources of the two novel species are similar to the typical substrates for the isolation of Z. bailii (Table 1), and it may be assumed that they possess similar food spoilage potential as Z. bailii. Indeed, one of the investigated Z. parabailii strains was a causative agent of spoilage outbreak of salad dressing in the USA (Suh et al., 2013). Z. bailii, Z. parabailii, and Z. pseudobaillii are not clearly distinguished from one another based on conventional physiological tests (Suh et al., 2013) and may be referred to as the Z. bailii species complex (Braun-Galleani et al., 2018). Analyses of genome sequences revealed that Z. parabailii is a hybrid of Z. bailii and a yet unknown Zygosaccharomyces species with approximately 93% overall genome sequence identity to Z. bailii (Ortiz-Merino et al., 2017). Similarly, genome sequence comparisons unveiled that Z. pseudobaillii is a hybrid of Z. bailii and an other unidentified Zygosaccharomyces species (Braun-Galleani et al., 2018).

3.2 The expanding group of extremely osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces species

The group of extremely osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces species delimited by Z. mellis and Zygosaccharomyces gambellarensis in Fig. 1 forms a subclade within the genus with 100% statistical support. Recently added species to this group are introduced in chronological order of their description.

Zygosaccharomyces machadoi has been proposed for a strain isolated from garbage pellets of the stingless bee Tetragonisca angustula in Brasil (Rosa and Lachance, 2005). The cell count of the species was in the order of 105 CFU g−1 pellet suggesting that the species is metabolically active in this substrate and that it may be an agent of spoilage in nests of stingless bees. The species, like Z. rouxii and Z. mellis grows in medium containing 50% glucose, but differs from them by its incapability of growing at the presence of 10% NaCl (Rosa and Lachance, 2005). Given the similar physiological characters to Z. rouxii and Z. mellis, the occurrence of Z. machadoi in honey made by European honey bee (Apis mellifera) sympatric to the stingless bee T. angustula would not be unexpected.

During the course of a study in Thailand, 186 yeast strains were isolated from 37 honey samples of 12 different bee species. Among the isolated strains, 6 proved to represent an undescribed Zygosaccharomyces species closely related to Z. mellis. For the placement of the 6 strains, 4 of which originated from honey of European honey bee, a novel species Zygosaccharomyces siamensis was introduced (Sakhincai et al., 2012). It has been recognised for a long time that Z. mellis consists of two genetically divergent subpopulations (Kurtzman 1990; Suezawa et al., 2008). Sakhincai et al. (2012) also noted that the so called β-subpopulation of Z. mellis (Suezawa et al., 2008) belongs to Z. siamensis. As the yeast count in honey ranged from 102 to 104 CFU ml−1, the authors came to the conclusion that Z. siamensis was metabolically active and able to grow in honey, which may be its normal environment, where, together with Z. mellis, it may be an agent of spoilage.

Zygosaccharomyces gambellarensis, the next member of the osmotolerant Zygosaccharomyces species, was recovered from a traditional sweet white wine produced in a small area of the Veneto region, Italy. The wine called Vin Santo of Gambellara is made from grapes, partially dried in attics for 5–6 months. During this drying process, saprophytic moulds, including Botrytis cinerea, grow on the grapes and contribute positively to the characteristics of the wine. At the beginning, osmotolerant non-Saccharomyces yeasts are commonly found in the fermenting must, which are gradually replaced by Saccharomyces species (Torriani et al., 2011). In a study of indigenous eukaryotic microbiota of Vin Santo of Gambellara, 25 isolates originating from different wineries proved to belong to an undescribed Zygosaccharomyces species. Following detailed physiological and molecular characterisation of 3 selected strains, Z. gambellarensis was proposed to accommodate the novel species, but no possible contribution to the chemical and sensory characteristics of the wine was mentioned (Torriani et al., 2011).

Zygosaccharomyces sapae related to Z. rouxii and Z. mellis was described for some halo- and osmotolerant yeast strains associated with the alcoholic fermentation of traditional balsamic vinegar, a condiment produced in some northern provinces of Italy (Solieri et al., 2013). Z. sapae shows unusually high, more than 20%, intragenomic ITS variability (Solieri et al., 2007) and might be a hybrid (Solieri et al., 2013). Several sugar-tolerant Zygosaccharomyces species contribute to the alcoholic fermentation step of traditional balsamic vinegar production (Solieri and Giudici, 2008), and Z. sapae may be involved as well.

Although the group of Zygosaccharomyces species delimited by Z. mellis and Z. gambellarensis in Fig. 1 are osmotolerant, all but one species can also grow in high water activity environment. To the contrary, Zygosaccharomyces favi recovered from bee bread and honey in Hungary has an absolute requirement for non-ionic solutes and is unable to grow in/on high water activity culture media (Čadež et al., 2015), therefore qualifies itself as an osmophilic yeast species according to the definition of Dakal et al. (2014). Zygosaccharomyces favi has been assumed to have spoilage potential in high-sugar food products (Čadež et al., 2015).

Very recently, Zygosaccharomyces seidelii was described based on a single strain isolated from flowers collected on the Maldives (Brysch-Herzberg et al., 2020). Although flowers are associated with honey, the relevance of Z. seidelii to foods remains to be determined.

Finally, Kluyveromyces osmophilus was transferred to the genus Zygosaccharomyces as Zygosaccharomyces osmophilus (Matos et al., 2020). K. osmophilus was described by Kreger-van Rij (1966) based on a single strain from sugar of Mauritius. James et al. (2005) raised the possibility that actually it represents a novel Zygosaccharomyces species. Several additional conspecific strains were isolated from honey and larval food of bees in Brazil. The phylogenetic position of K. osmophilus was determined by DNA barcode sequence and phylogenomic analyses. As a result, K. osmophilus was reassigned as Z. osmophilus (Matos et al., 2020). Although, according to the above cited definition of Dakal et al. (2014), Z. osmophilus is not osmophilic, its association with high-sugar foods is obvious.

4 Conclusions

DNA sequence based yeast identification has aided the discovery and description of numerous novel yeast species in the last two decades. The significant food associated genus Zygosaccharomyces has considerably been expanded as well, and the trend may be anticipated to continue in the future. Accumulating data will shed light to the particular impact of the newly described species on the quality of the foods of their origin.

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Hungarian Ministry for Innovation and Technology. The Project was also supported by the European Union and co-financed by the European Social Fund (grant agreement no. EFOP-3.6.3-VEKOP-16-2017-00005).

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    • Export Citation
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  • Braun-Galleani, S. , Ortiz-Merino, R.A. , Wu, Q. , Xu, Y. , and Wolfe, K.H. (2018). Zygosaccharomyces pseudobailii, another yeast interspecies hybrid that regained fertility by damaging one of its MAT loci. FEMS Yeast Research, 18(7): foy079, https://doi.org/10.1093/femsyr/foy079.

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  • James, S.A. and Stratford, M. (2003). Spoilage yeasts with special emphasis on the genus Zygosaccharomyces. In: Boekhout, T. , and Robert, V. (Eds.), Yeasts in food: beneficial and detrimental aspects, Behr’s Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 171191.

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  • James, S.A. and Stratford, M. (2011). Zygosaccharomyces Barker (1901). In: Kurtzman, C.P. , Fell, J.W. , and Boekhout, T. (Eds.), The yeasts: a taxonomic study, 5th edition, Vol. 2. Elsevier Amsterdam, pp. 937947.

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  • James, S.A. , Bond, C.J. , Stratford, M. , and Roberts, I.N. (2005). Molecular evidence for the existence of natural hybrids in the genus Zygosaccharomyces. FEMS Yeast Research, 5(8): 747755.

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  • Kurtzman, C.P. , Fell, J.W. , and Boekhout, T. (Eds.), (2011). The yeasts: a taxonomic study, 5th ed. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 2354.

  • Matos, T.T.S. , Teixeira, J.F. , Macias, L.G. , Santos, A.R.O. , Suh, S.-O. , Barrio, E. , Lachance, M.-A. , and Rosa, C.A. (2020). Kluyveromyces osmophilus is not a synonym of Zygosaccharomyces mellis; reinstatement as Zygosaccharomyces osmophilus comb. nov. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 70(5): 33743378.

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  • Michel, M. , Meier-Doernberg, T. , Jacob, F. , Methner, F.-J. , Wagner, R.S. , and Hutzler, M. (2016). Review: pure non-Saccharomyces starter cultures for beer fermentation with a focus on secondary metabolites and practical applications. Journal of the Institute of Brewing, 122(4): 569587.

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  • Ortiz-Merino, R.A. , Kuanyshev, N. , Braun-Galleani, S. , Byrne, K.P. , Porro, D. , Branduardi, P. , and Wolfe, K.H. (2017). Evolutionary restoration of fertility in an interspecies hybrid yeast, by whole-genome duplication after a failed mating-type switch. PLOS Biology, Available at: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2002128 (Accessed: 9 June 2021).

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  • Schoch, C.L. , Seifert, K.A. , Huhndorf, S. , Robert, V. , Spouge, J.L. , Levesque, A. , and Wen Chen, W. , and Fungal Barcoding, and Consortium (2012). Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(16): 62416246.

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  • Solieri, L. and Giudici, P. (2008). Yeasts associated to traditional balsamic vinegar: ecological and technological features. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 125(1): 3645.

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  • Solieri, L. , Dakal, T.C. , and Giudici, P. (2013). Zygosaccharomyces sapae sp. nov., isolated from Italian traditional balsamic vinegar. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 63: 364371.

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  • Suezawa, Y. , Suzuki, M. , and Mori, H. (2008). Genotyping of a miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, based on sequence analysis of the partial 26S ribosomal RNA gene and two internal transcribed spacers. Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, 72(9) 24522455.

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  • Suh, S.-O. , Gujjari, P. , Beres, C. , Beck, B. , and Zhou, J. (2013). Proposal of Zygosaccharomyces parabailii sp. nov. and Zygosaccharomyces pseudobailii sp. nov., novel species closely related to Zygosaccharomyces bailii. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 63(5): 19221929.

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  • Tamang, J.P. , Watanabe, K. , and Holzapfel, W.H. (2016). Review: diversity of microorganisms in global fermented foods and beverages. Frontiers in Microbiology, 7: 377, Available at: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.00377 (Accessed: 18 February 2021).

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  • Torriani, S. , Lorenzini, M. , Salvetti, E. , and Felis, G.E. (2011). Zygosaccharomyces gambellarensis sp. nov., an ascosporogenous yeast isolated from an Italian ’passito’ style wine. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, 61: 30843088.

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The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: András Salgó

Co-ordinating Editor(s) Marianna Tóth-Markus

Co-editor(s): A. Halász

       Editorial Board

  • L. Abrankó (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)
  • D. Bánáti (University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • J. Baranyi (Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK)
  • I. Bata-Vidács (Agro-Environmental Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • J. Beczner (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • F. Békés (FBFD PTY LTD, Sydney, NSW Australia)
  • Gy. Biró (National Institute for Food and Nutrition Science, Budapest, Hungary)
  • A. Blázovics (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • F. Capozzi (University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)
  • M. Carcea (Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics Rome, Italy)
  • Zs. Cserhalmi (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • M. Dalla Rosa (University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)
  • I. Dalmadi (Szent István University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • K. Demnerova (University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • M. Dobozi King (Texas A&M University, Texas, USA)
  • Muying Du (Southwest University in Chongqing, Chongqing, China)
  • S. N. El (Ege University, Izmir, Turkey)
  • S. B. Engelsen (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)
  • E. Gelencsér (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • V. M. Gómez-López (Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Murcia, Spain)
  • J. Hardi (University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia)
  • K. Héberger (Research Centre for Natural Sciences, ELKH, Budapest, Hungary)
  • N. Ilić (University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia)
  • D. Knorr (Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany)
  • H. Köksel (Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey)
  • K. Liburdi (Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy)
  • M. Lindhauer (Max Rubner Institute, Detmold, Germany)
  • M.-T. Liong (Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia)
  • M. Manley (Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa)
  • M. Mézes (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)
  • Á. Németh (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • P. Ng (Michigan State University,  Michigan, USA)
  • Q. D. Nguyen (Szent István University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • L. Nyström (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)
  • L. Perez (University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain)
  • V. Piironen (University of Helsinki, Finland)
  • A. Pino (University of Catania, Catania, Italy)
  • M. Rychtera (University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • K. Scherf (Technical University, Munich, Germany)
  • R. Schönlechner (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria)
  • A. Sharma (Department of Atomic Energy, Delhi, India)
  • A. Szarka (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • M. Szeitzné Szabó (National Food Chain Safety Office, Budapest, Hungary)
  • S. Tömösközi (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • L. Varga (University of West Hungary, Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary)
  • R. Venskutonis (Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania)
  • B. Wróblewska (Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences Olsztyn, Poland)

 

Acta Alimentaria
E-mail: Acta.Alimentaria@uni-mate.hu

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2020
 
Total Cites
768
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
0,650
Rank by
Nutrition & Dietetics 79/89 (Q4)
Impact Factor
Food Science & Technology 130/144 (Q4)
Impact Factor
0,575
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year
0,899
Impact Factor
Journal
0,17
Citation Indicator
 
Rank by Journal
Nutrition & Dietetics 88/103 (Q4)
Citation Indicator
Food Science & Technology 142/160 (Q4)
Citable
59
Items
Total
58
Articles
Total
1
Reviews
Scimago
28
H-index
Scimago
0,237
Journal Rank
Scimago
Food Science Q3
Quartile Score
 
Scopus
248/238=1,0
Scite Score
 
Scopus
Food Science 216/310 (Q3)
Scite Score Rank
 
Scopus
0,349
SNIP
 
Days from
100
submission
 
to acceptance
 
Days from
143
acceptance
 
to publication
 
Acceptance
16%
Rate
2019  
Total Cites
WoS
522
Impact Factor 0,458
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,433
5 Year
Impact Factor
0,503
Immediacy
Index
0,100
Citable
Items
60
Total
Articles
59
Total
Reviews
1
Cited
Half-Life
7,8
Citing
Half-Life
9,8
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00034
Article Influence
Score
0,077
% Articles
in
Citable Items
98,33
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,04267
Average
IF
Percentile
7,429
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,212
Scopus
Scite Score
220/247=0,9
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Food Science 215/299 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,275
Acceptance
Rate
15%

 

Acta Alimentaria
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 1100 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
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Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 754 EUR / 944 USD
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Acta Alimentaria
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1972
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia    
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0139-3006 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2535 (Online)

 

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