View More View Less
  • 1 Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Okayama University 2-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Okayama, 700-8530, Japan
  • 2 Environmental Resources Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA 16802, USA
  • 3 Center for Statistical Ecology and Environmental Statistics, Department of Statistics, The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA 16802, USA
Full access

With continuing proliferation of human influences on landscapes, there is mounting incentive to undertake quantification of relationships between spatial patterns of human populations and vegetation. In considering such quantification, it is apparent that investigations must be conducted at different scales and in a comparative manner across regions. At the broader scales it becomes necessary to utilize remote sensing of vegetation for comparative studies against map referenced census data. This paper explores such an approach for the urbanized area in the Tokyo vicinity. Vegetation is represented by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) as determined from data acquired by the thematic mapper (TM) sensor of the Landsat satellite. Sparseness of vegetation is analyzed in relation to density of human residence, first by regression analysis involving stratified distance zones and then by the recent echelon approach for characterization of surfaces. Echelons reveal structural organization of surfaces in an objective and explicit manner. The virtual surface determined by census data collected on a grid is shown to have structural correspondence with the surface representing vegetation greenness as reflected in magnitude of NDVI values computed from red and infrared bands of image data.

If the inline PDF is not rendering correctly, you can download the PDF file here.

  • Patil, G. P. 1998. Statistical ecology and environmental statistics for cost-effective ecological synthesis and environmental analysis. In: R. S. Ambash (ed.), Modern Trends in Ecology and Environment. Backhuys Publ., Leiden. The Netherlands, pp. 5-36.

    Statistical ecology and environmental statistics for cost-effective ecological synthesis and environmental analysis. , () 5 -36.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Sabins, F. F. 1996. Remote Sensing: Principles and Interpretation. Third Edition, Freeman and Company, New York.

    Remote Sensing: Principles and Interpretation. , ().

  • Carr, D. 1991. Looking at large data sets using binned data plots. In: A. Buja and P. Tukey (eds.), Computing and Graphics in Statistics. Springer, New York. pp. 7-39.

    Looking at large data sets using binned data plots. , () 7 -39.

  • Carr, D., R. Littlefield W. Nicholson and J. Littlefield. 1987. Scatterplot matrix techniques for large N. Journal of the American Statistical Association 82: 424-436.

    'Scatterplot matrix techniques for large N ' () 82 Journal of the American Statistical Association : 424 -436.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Isaaks, E. and R. M. Srivastava 1989. An Introduction to Applied Geostatistics. Oxford University Press, New York.

    An Introduction to Applied Geostatistics. , ().

  • Jensen, J. R. 2000. Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Remote Perspective. Prentice Hall, Upper saddle river.

    Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Remote Perspective. , ().

  • Kurihara, K. 1995. An approach to statistical software for exploratory data analysis. Proceedings of International Conference on Statistical Methods and Statistical Computing for Quality and Productivity Improvement, pp. 435-441.

    'An approach to statistical software for exploratory data analysis ' , , .

  • Kurihara, K. 1997. On the Properties of a Test Process Composed of a Test for Outliers and t Test. Proceedings of the Sixth China-Japan Symposium on Statistics, pp. 103-106.

    'On the Properties of a Test Process Composed of a Test for Outliers and t Test ' , , .

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Miller, R. I. 1994. Mapping the Diversity of Nature. Chapman and Hall, London.

    Mapping the Diversity of Nature. , ().

  • Myers, W. L. 1999. Remote sensing and quantitative geogrids in PHASES. Technical Report ER9901, Environmental Resources Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. pp. 1-57.

  • Myers, W. L., G. P. Patil and K. Joly 1997. Echelon approach to areas of concern in synoptic regional monitoring. Environmental and Ecological Statistics 4: 131-152.

    'Echelon approach to areas of concern in synoptic regional monitoring ' () 4 Environmental and Ecological Statistics : 131 -152.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Myers, W. L., G. P. Patil and C. Taillie 1999. Conceptualizing pattern analysis of spectral change relative to ecosystem status. Ecosystem Health 5: 285-293.

    'Conceptualizing pattern analysis of spectral change relative to ecosystem status ' () 5 Ecosystem Health : 285 -293.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Cardillo, M., D. W. Macdonald and S. P. Rushton. 1999. Predicting mammal species richness and distributions: testing the effectiveness of satellite-derived land cover data. Landscape Ecology 14: 423-435.

    'Predicting mammal species richness and distributions: testing the effectiveness of satellite-derived land cover data ' () 14 Landscape Ecology : 423 -435.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Spellerberg, I. F. 1991. Monitoring Ecological Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

    Monitoring Ecological Change. , ().

  • Johnson, G.D., W. M. Myers, G. P. Patil T. J. O'Connell and R. P. Brooks. 1999. Predictability of bird community-based ecological integrity using landscape measurements. Technical Report 99-0601, Center for Statistical Ecology and Environmental Statistics, Department of Statistics. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

  • Impact Factor (2018): 0.746
  • Ecology SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q3
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.428
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 25

Language: English

Founded in 2000
Publication: One volume of two issues annually
Publication Programme: 2020. Vol. 21.
Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Biological Abstracts
  • BIOSIS Previews
  • CAB Abstracts
  • Biology & Environmental Sciences
  • Elsevier/Geo Abstracts
  • Science Citation Index Expanded
  • SCOPUS
  • Zoological Abstracts

 

Subscribers can access the electronic version of every printed article.

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Podani, János

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Jordán, Ferenc

Honorary Editor(s): Orlóci, László

Editorial Board

  • Madhur Anand, CAN (forest ecology, computational ecology, and ecological complexity)
  • S. Bagella, ITA (temporal dynamics, including succession, community level patterns of species richness and diversity, experimental studies of plant, animal and microbial communities, plant communities of the Mediterranean)
  • P. Batáry, HUN (landscape ecology, agroecology, ecosystem services)
  • P. A. V. Borges, PRT (community level patterns of species richness and diversity, sampling in theory and practice)
  • A. Davis, GER (supervised learning, multitrophic interactions, food webs, multivariate analysis, ecological statistics, experimental design, fractals, parasitoids, species diversity, community assembly, ticks, biodiversity, climate change, biological networks, cranes, olfactometry, evolution)
  • Z. Elek, HUN (insect ecology, invertebrate conservation, population dynamics, especially of long-term field studies, insect sampling)
  • T. Kalapos, HUN (community level plant ecophysiology, grassland ecology, vegetation-soil relationship)
  • G. M. Kovács, HUN (microbial ecology, plant-fungus interactions, mycorrhizas)
  • W. C. Liu,TWN (community-based ecological theory and modelling issues, temporal dynamics, including succession, trophic interactions, competition, species response to the environment)
  • L. Mucina, AUS (vegetation survey, syntaxonomy, evolutionary community ecology, assembly rules, global vegetation patterns, mediterranean ecology)
  • P. Ódor, HUN (plant communities, bryophyte ecology, numerical methods)
  • F. Rigal, FRA (island biogeography, macroecology, functional diversity, arthropod ecology)
  • D. Rocchini, ITA (biodiversity, multiple scales, spatial scales, species distribution, spatial ecology, remote sensing, ecological informatics, computational ecology)
  • F. Samu, HUN (landscape ecology, biological control, generalist predators, spiders, arthropods, conservation biology, sampling methods)
  • U. Scharler, ZAF (ecological networks, food webs, estuaries, marine, mangroves, stoichiometry, temperate, subtropical)
  • D. Schmera, HUN (aquatic communities, functional diversity, ecological theory)
  • M. Scotti, GER (community-based ecological theory and modelling issues, trophic interactions, competition, species response to the environment, ecological networks)
  • B. Tóthmérész, HUN (biodiversity, soil zoology, spatial models, macroecology, ecological modeling)
  • S. Wollrab, GER (aquatic ecology, food web dynamics, plankton ecology, predator-prey interactions)

 

Advisory Board

  • S. Bartha, HUN
  • S.L. Collins, USA
  • T. Czárán, HUN
  • E. Feoli, ITA
  • N. Kenkel, CAN
  • J. Lepš, CZE
  • S. Mazzoleni, ITA
  • Cs. Moskát, HUN
  • B. Oborny, HUN
  • M.W. Palmer, USA
  • G.P. Patil, USA
  • V. de Patta Pillar, BRA
  • C. Ricotta, ITA
  • Á. Szentesi, HUN

PODANI, JÁNOS
E-mail: podani@ludens.elte.hu


JORDÁN, FERENC
E-mail: jordan.ferenc@gmail.com

Click HERE for submission guidelines.


Manuscript submission: COMEC Manuscript Submission