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B. Udayasree Department of Civil Engineering, SRK University, Bhopal, India

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G. Shravan Kumar Department of Civil Engineering, SRK University, Bhopal, India

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Abstract

Due to significant industrialization, many countries have adopted the practice of industrial symbiosis, which involves utilizing the waste produced by one industry as a resource for another industry. The utilization of spent foundry sand (SFS), which is derived from the metal casting industry, poses a significant risk to both the environment and living organisms as a result of the existence of inorganic and organic substances. Nevertheless, this waste material can serve as a valuable resource for the construction sector. The utilization of SFS is significantly restricted due to insufficient comprehension of its concrete performance, despite its extensive range of applications. It is imperative to comprehend the behavior of spent foundry sand in concrete, particularly in relation to achieving a structure that is both strength-efficient and durable. The current study explores the usability of M-sand and spent foundry sand in self-compacting concrete. Reference concrete was produced by replacing river sand with 100% M-sand. M-sand was substituted with spent foundry sand in ratios ranging from 0 to 30%. Compared to the reference mix, SCC's mechanical and durability properties with 20% SFS were better. In comparison to the reference mix, SCC containing 20% SFS had higher mechanical and durability characteristics at 3, 7, 28 days, and 28 days, respectively. With 20% SFS, replacement showed better mechanical properties at all curing ages and better durability performance at 28 days of the curing period.

Abstract

Due to significant industrialization, many countries have adopted the practice of industrial symbiosis, which involves utilizing the waste produced by one industry as a resource for another industry. The utilization of spent foundry sand (SFS), which is derived from the metal casting industry, poses a significant risk to both the environment and living organisms as a result of the existence of inorganic and organic substances. Nevertheless, this waste material can serve as a valuable resource for the construction sector. The utilization of SFS is significantly restricted due to insufficient comprehension of its concrete performance, despite its extensive range of applications. It is imperative to comprehend the behavior of spent foundry sand in concrete, particularly in relation to achieving a structure that is both strength-efficient and durable. The current study explores the usability of M-sand and spent foundry sand in self-compacting concrete. Reference concrete was produced by replacing river sand with 100% M-sand. M-sand was substituted with spent foundry sand in ratios ranging from 0 to 30%. Compared to the reference mix, SCC's mechanical and durability properties with 20% SFS were better. In comparison to the reference mix, SCC containing 20% SFS had higher mechanical and durability characteristics at 3, 7, 28 days, and 28 days, respectively. With 20% SFS, replacement showed better mechanical properties at all curing ages and better durability performance at 28 days of the curing period.

1 Introduction

The phenomenon of economic globalization can be attributed to the substantial expansion of industrialization, which has concurrently led to a notable surge in the requirement for raw materials. Despite the considerable efforts of researchers and scientists involved in the development of sustainable science strategies, there is still a significant distance to cover towards achieving a more equitable and harmonious world with nature. The notion of sustainability was first introduced in 1987 by the Brundtland Commission, which proposed a strategy to meet the needs of a burgeoning population while preserving resources for future generations. The concept of industrial symbiosis is a recent development that has gained widespread acceptance in many countries. It is believed that this approach can help achieve sustainability goals without compromising economic growth. The proposed approach emphasizes the collaborative utilization of resources among multiple industries. Specifically, the waste generated during the production process of one industry is repurposed as a resource for another industry.

Concrete is the most widely utilized man-made material for building on the planet. Vibrating equipments are normally required to remove the entrapped air in concrete to make it dense and homogeneous. Skilled workers do adequate compaction of concrete, making concrete structures more durable. In the beginning of 1983, Japan's construction companies faced the problem of shortage of skilled workers which in turn lead to the reduction of quality of construction work [1]. This paved the way for the development of SCC. It is a type of concrete that can move under its own weight without the need for mechanical vibration. Therefore, SCC is a cohesive concrete that can fill every corner of a congested reinforcement region by flowing under its own weight without any mechanical vibration [2].

When it comes to SCC, the aggregates are responsible for sixty to seventy percent of the entire volume. Fine aggregate used in SCC for centuries is natural sand [3]. On the other hand, due to depletion and increased demand for natural sand, restrictions are being imposed on exploitation of natural sand, making researchers find alternative materials to natural sand [4]. This led to the production of M-sand and SFS as a replacement for natural sand in concrete [5].

Manufactured sand is produced by crushing of stones, screening and washing of sand. Compared to naturally weathered sand, manufactured sand consists of more sharp-cornered and rough surface texture. However, it is possible to produce cubical shape particles with uniform grading by using appropriate crushing technology. Since M-sand contains high fines it increases water demand compared to river sand. On the other hand, these fines present in M-sand contribute to high paste volume, which is essential for any SCC mix [6, 7].

In the United States over 3,000 foundries generate 6 to 10 million tons of SFS per year. Only 10 percent of the 6 to 10 million spent foundry sand is reused. The ‘spent foundry sand’ from the non-ferrous foundries is generally not reused. In India out of 1.71 million tons of industrial waste, 0.18 million tons of waste are generated from foundry industries per year. Foundry sand is used in engineering usages namely portland cement concrete, embankments, hot mix asphalt and flowable fill. Foundry sand is also used extensively in agriculture as topsoil. Blending spent foundry sand with fine or coarse aggregates can be used as a sub-base or road-base material [8, 9].

Although extensive studies have been accompanied on the mechanical characteristics of regular concrete, very few studies on SCC containing M-sand and spent foundry sand are now available. The current research studied the effect of spent foundry sand and M-sand on workability and strength characteristics. In addition, the quality of spent foundry sand and M-sand incorporated SCC was checked for the transport properties such as sorptivity and water absorption.

2 Materials

OPC of 53 grade conforming to BIS: 12269-1987 [10] with specific gravity, consistency, initial and final setting time of 3.13, 32%, 110 and 280 min, respectively, is used in this research. Fly ash is obtained from a local thermal power plant (i.e., RTPP, YSR district) conforming to IS:3812-2003 [11]. River sand is used as a fine aggregate with specific gravity, bulk density, fineness modulus and maximum size of 2.6, 1810 kg m−3, 3.15 and 4.75 mm, respectively. Coarse aggregate having an angular shape with bulk density, fineness modulus, maximum size and specific gravity of 1940 kg m−3, 6.5, 2.6 and 10 mm, respectively, is used [12]. Manufactured sand is purchased from local industry in Hyderabad and is utilized as a fine aggregate conforming to IS:2386-1963 [13]. Spent foundry sand acquired from local industry in Hyderabad is utilized as a fine aggregate conforming to IS:1918-1966 [14]. GLENIUM (i.e., brand name-BASF) is utilized as a superplasticizer (i.e., polycarboxylate ether).

3 SCC mix design

The primary goal of this research is to examine the fresh and strength properties of M-sand concrete without and with spent foundry sand. The mix proportions were determined by testing numerous mixes developed according to IS10262-2009 [15] recommendations for grades M30 with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.45, as shown in Table 1. In all SCC mixes, the quantities of fly ash and alccofine were kept constant at 30% and 20% by weight of whole powder content, respectively. SCC1 mix was prepared by replacing 100% of fine aggregate with manufactured sand without any addition of spent foundry sand. Further mixes SCC2 to SCC4, manufactured sand was replaced with SFS in proportions of 10%, 20% and 30%, respectively. Further mixes SCC2 to SCC4 were prepared by keeping fly ash and alccofine as 30% and 20% of cement as in SCC0 and SCC1 with varying quantities of spent foundry sand (i.e., 10%, 20% and 30%) by weight of manufactured sand. In all mixes, the W/B ratio is kept at 0.45.

Table 1.

SCC mix proportions per cubic meter of concrete

MixesCementFly ashAlccofineFine aggregateM-sandSpent foundry sandGravel
SCC0374.25124.7549.9863.3600721.60
SCC1374.25124.7549.90863.360721.60
SCC2374.25124.7549.90777.0286.34721.60
SCC3374.25124.7549.90690.68172.68721.60
SCC4374.25124.7549.90604.34259.02721.60

4 Methods

4.1 Fresh properties

Workability characteristics were assessed using European guidelines. Filling ability was assessed using slump flow and U-box, L-box and V-funnel tests were used to determine passing abilities.

4.2 Hardened properties

The compressive strength was examined using cube specimen of 150 mm [16]. Splitting tensile strength was measured using cylinders (150 × 300 mm) [17]. The flexural strength was measured using prism specimens with measurements of 500 × 100 × 100 mm [18].

4.3 Durability property

The sorptivity of a specimen is calculated at age 28 days based on ASTM C1585-13 [19]. The rate of water penetration into the pores of the concrete by capillary suction is measured by sorptivity. The specimens having a size of 50 mm thick slice of 100 mm diameter cylinders, painted on all sides except at the bottom surface. All the other sides are protected with a rubber membrane. The concrete slice is placed in a pan and exposed to liquid on the bottom surface, as shown in Fig. 3. The liquid level is kept constant at 5 mm. At the regular interval, the mass of slice is weighed and the sorptivity (I) is calculated by using the below Equation.
Sorptivity(I)=mta*d

5 Results and discussion

5.1 Flow properties

Table 2 shows the fresh properties of SCC mixes without and with 100% replacement of manufactured sand. Figure 2 illustrates the workability test results obtained by employing slump, L-box, U-box, and V-funnel with 100% percent substitution of natural sand by manufactured sand (i.e., SCC1 mix). The surface texture and shape of the M-sand have a major impact on the water demand of the mix. The smooth texture and round shape of the river sand lower interparticle friction in the fine aggregate, resulting in great workability. The rough surface and angular shape of M-sand promote internal friction in the mix, reducing the workability of concrete. The value of workability for SCC2 to SCC4 mixes are the lowest, indicating the low workability at various replacements of spend foundry sand (i.e., 10%, 20% and 30%). Since spent foundry sand is much finer than M-sand, it increases the water demand for workable mix.

Table 2.

Fresh properties of SCC mixes

MixesSlumpV-funnelL-boxU-box
SCC06808.750.850.8
SCC16918.50.870.7
SCC26868.520.881.2
SCC36828.550.911.5
SCC46708.60.862.2

5.2 Compressive strength

Figure 1 shows the compressive strengths of SCC mixes at the curing period of 3, 7 and 28 days. It is observed that a slight enhancement in compressive strength is accomplished with a 100% percentage substitution of natural sand by manufactured (i.e., SCC1 mix) sand at all curing days as shown in Fig. 1. The compressive strength of SCC 2 and SCC3 mixes containing 10% and 20% SFS is enhanced by 5.4%, 5.9%, 3.87% and 11.48%, 7.9%, 5.8%, for the curing age of 3, 7 and 28 days, respectively, in compression to the SCC1 mix. However, the compressive strength is enhanced in the range of 1.9%–2.7% with the addition of 30% SFS. With the addition of SFS, the compressive strength is greatly increased, which can be attributed to the densification of the concrete matrix caused by the filling of pores by SFS particles. Possible causes of a loss in strength include disruption of aggregate particle packing or an increase in finer material at high replacement levels. Additionally, the inclusion of fine binder particles in SFS might result in a loss in strength. The binder type and contaminants present in SFS can also substantially impact its strength.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

CS of SCC mixes at curing period of 3, 7 and 28 days

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 14, 3; 10.1556/1848.2023.00648

5.3 Split tensile strength

Figure 2 illustrates the SPT of SCC mixes measured at the curing period of 7 and 28 days. The outcomes exhibited that the SCC1 mix (i.e., 100% M-sand) had somewhat higher tensile strength values than the SCC0 mix (i.e., Conventional SCC mix). At 7 days, SPT of SCC2, SCC3 and SCC4 mixes improved by 6.25%, 12.5% and 3.125%, respectively, compared to the SCC1 mix. The SPT of concrete at 28th age for mixes SCC2, SCC3 and SCC4 also increased by 4.76%, 11.9% and 2.38%, compared to SCC1 mix. Because of its greater surface area and chemical composition, SFS improves the STS of concrete by reducing the binder paste aggregate transition zone. Because SFS is a very fine substance, it reduced the porosity of concrete, which in turn increased the density and resulted in the achievement of a greater split tensile strength.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

STS of SCC mixes at curing period of 7 and 28 days

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 14, 3; 10.1556/1848.2023.00648

Table 3 illustrates the predicted equations for the STS of SCC mixes from CEB-FIP (1990) and ACI 363R (ACI, 1992). The obtained split tensile strength of SCC mixes after curing period of 7 and 28 days was compared with the CEB-FIP (1990) and ACI 363R (ACI, 1992) predicted equations and is displayed in Table 4.

Table 3.

Split tensile strength equations as per codes

CodeExpression for STS (MPa)Range of compressive strength
CEB-FIP1.56[fc810]23fc < 80 MPa
ACI 363R0.59(fc)1221 MPa < fc < 83 MPa
Table 4.

Measured and expected STS of SCC mixes

MixesCuring agesSplit tensile strength
ExperimentalACI 363RCEB-FIP
SCC07 days2.92.82.0
SCC13.22.972.25
SCC23.43.052.38
SCC33.63.082.42
SCC43.332.30
SCC028 days4.13.352.8
SCC14.23.543.10
SCC24.43.613.21
SCC34.73.653.26
SCC44.33.583.16

5.4 Modulus of rupture

Figure 3 depicts the modulus of rupture with and without M-sand and spent foundry sand for SCC mixtures at 7 and 28 days after curing. It is observed that a slight enhancement in MOR is accomplished with a 100% percentage substitution of natural sand by manufactured (i.e., SCC1 mix) sand at all curing days as shown in Fig. 3. At 7 days of curing, the MOR for SCC mixes was improved by 6.12%, 12.24% and 8.16% compared to the SCC1 mix. The MOR of SCC at 28th curing age was also enhanced by 3.12%, 7.81% and 4.68% compared to the SCC1 mix. The same pattern was observed in STS and CS at early and later ages. Because of its greater surface area and chemical composition, SFS improves the modulus of rupture of concrete by reducing the binder paste aggregate transition zone. Because SFS is a very fine substance, it reduced the porosity of concrete, which in turn increased the density and resulted in the achievement of a greater modulus of rupture.

The estimated equations for the concrete's modulus of rupture from ACI 318R and ACI 363R are shown in Table 5. Table 6 compares the measured modulus of rupture of SCC mixes after curing period of 7 and 28 days with the ACI 318R and ACI 363R predicted equations.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

MOR of SCC mixes at 7 and 28 days of curing

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 14, 3; 10.1556/1848.2023.00648

Table 5.

Expressions for modulus of rupture

CodeExpression for STS (MPa)Range of compressive strength
ACI 363R0.94(fc)12Not Specified
ACI 318R0.62(fc)12Not specified
Table 6.

Measured and predicted modulus of rupture of SCC mixes

MixesCuring agesModulus of rupture
ExperimentalACI 363RCEB-FIP
SCC07 days4.74.472.95
SCC14.94.733.12
SCC25.24.873.21
SCC35.54.913.24
SCC45.34.783.16
SCC028 days6.25.353.53
SCC16.45.653.73
SCC26.65.763.80
SCC36.95.813.83
SCC46.75.703.76

5.5 Sorptivity test

The sorptivity of SCC mixes was tested according to the ASTM C1585-13. It could be observed that the maximum absorption (I) is obtained in the SCC0 mix about 1.9 mm and the minimum absorption (I) is obtained in the SCC3 mix about 1.65 mm, comparatively from the other mixes. The result reveals that the inclusion of SFS particles has decreased in capillary suction and improved the resistance against the ingress water into the cement matrix, thus making the concrete highly impermeable.

6 Conclusion

The following are the key findings of this study:

  • It was observed that while replacing M-sand with spent foundry slag reduced the flow of concrete, it significantly improved its cohesiveness.

  • A number of tests were conducted to see what effect spent foundry slag had on strength and durability. All concrete mixtures reached their target compressive strength in 3, 7 and 28 days, and most importantly, reference concrete and 20 SFS concrete reached their goals in 3 and 7 days. Up to 20% of M-sand being replaced with SFS, no loss of strength was seen. The SFS concrete demonstrated acceptable flexural and tensile strength results, with the latter displaying a comparable proclivity to compressive strength.

  • The sorptivity test showed better results with adding SFS into the concrete; maximum and minimum absorption values were observed for the SCC0 mix and SCC3 mix, respectively.

Acknowledgement

The authors acknowledge the Department of Civil Engineering, SRK University, Bhopal, India, providing a laboratory testing facility.

References

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  • [1]

    B. V. Kavyateja, J. Guru Jawahar, and C. Sashidhar, “Effectiveness of alccofine and fly ash on mechanical properties of ternary blended self compacting concrete,” Mater. Today Proc., vol. 33, pp. 7379, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [2]

    B. V. Kavyateja, J. Guru Jawahar, and C. Sashidhar, “Effect of alccofine and fly ash on analytical methods of self-compacting concrete,” Innov. Infrastruct. Solut., vol. 5, pp. 111, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [3]

    G. Kaur, R. Siddique, and A. Rajor, “Properties of concrete containing fungal treated waste foundry sand,” Constr. Build. Mater., vol. 29, pp. 8287, 2012.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [4]

    B. V. Kavyateja, J. Guru Jawahar, C. Sashidhar, and N. Reddy Panga, “Moment carrying capacity of RSCC beams incorporating alccofine and fly ash,” Pollack Period., vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 1924, 2021.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [5]

    P. N. Reddy, B. Bhushan Jindal, B. V. Kavyateja, and A. Narender Reddy, “Strength enhancement of concrete incorporating alccofine and SNF based admixture,” Adv. Concr. Constr., vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 345354, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [6]

    B. V. Kavyateja, P. N. Reddy, and C. Arvind Kumar, “Properties of self-compacting concrete modified with ultrafine slag,” Res. Eng. Struct. Mater., vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 371384, 2022.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [7]

    P. N. Reddy and J. Ahmed Naqash, “Effectiveness of polycarboxylate ether on early strength development of alccofine concrete,” Pollack Period., vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 7990, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [8]

    B. V. Kavyateja and P. N. Reddy, “Effect of industrial waste on strength properties of concrete,” Annales de Chimie: Sci. des Materiaux, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 353358, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [9]

    P. N. Reddy and J. Ahmed Naqash, “Strength prediction of high early strength concrete by artificial intelligence,” Int. J. Eng. Adv. Technol., vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 330334, 2019.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [10]

    BIS: 12269-1987, B.: Specification for 53 Grade Ordinary Portland Cement, Bur. Indian Stand. New Delhi, India, 1987.

  • [11]

    BIS-3812 (Part-1):2003, Pulverized fuel ashspecification for use as pozzolana in cement, cement mortar and concrete, New Delhi, India, Bureau of Indian Standards.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [12]

    BIS 383, Specification for Coarse and Fine Aggregate from natural Sources for Concrete (Second Revision), New Delhi, India, Bureau of Indian Standards, 1970.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [13]

    IS:2386-1963(Part-1), Methods of test for aggregates for concrete-Particle size and shape IS:2386-1963 (Part-3) : Methods of test for aggregates for concrete- Specific gravity, density, Voids, absorption and bulking.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [14]

    I. S., Indian methods of physical tests for foundry sands (IS 1918-1966), 1966.

  • [15]

    Indian standard recommended guidelines for concrete mix design IS 10262: 1982, Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi.

  • [16]

    IS 516, Indian standard code for method of test for strength of concrete. 1959.

  • [17]

    IS 5816, Splitting tensile strength of concrete – Method of test (First revision). 1999.

  • [18]

    ASTM C78-07, Standard test method for flexural strength of concrete.

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    ASTM C1585—13, Standard Test Method for Measurement of Rate of Absorption of Water by Hydraulic-Cement Concretes. USA, ASTM International, 2013.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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    Jozsef NYERS Subotica Tech College of Applied Sciences Subotica Serbia

    Bjarne W. OLESEN Technical University of Denmark Lyngby Denmark

    Stefan ONIGA North University of Baia Mare Baia Mare Romania

    Joaquim Norberto PIRES Universidade de Coimbra Coimbra Portugal

    László POKORÁDI Óbuda University Budapest Hungary

    Antal PUHL (1950–2023) University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Roman RABENSEIFER Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava Bratislava Slovak Republik

    Mohammad H. A. SALAH Hashemite University Zarqua Jordan

    Dietrich SCHMIDT Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology IWES Kassel Germany

    Lorand SZABÓ Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Cluj-Napoca Romania

    Csaba SZÁSZ Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Cluj-Napoca Romania

    Ioan SZÁVA Transylvania University of Brasov Brasov Romania

    Péter SZEMES University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Edit SZŰCS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Radu TARCA University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    Zsolt TIBA University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    László TÓTH University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    László TÖRÖK University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Anton TRNIK Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra Nitra Slovakia

    Ibrahim UZMAY Erciyes University Kayseri Turkey

    Tibor VESSELÉNYI University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    Nalinaksh S. VYAS Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur India

    Deborah WHITE The University of Adelaide Adelaide Australia

International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering
Address of the institute: Faculty of Engineering, University of Debrecen
H-4028 Debrecen, Ótemető u. 2-4. Hungary
Email: irase@eng.unideb.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

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2022  
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.235
Scimago Quartile Score Architecture (Q2)
Engineering (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Environmental Engineering (Q3)
Information Systems (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1.6
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Architecture 46/170 (73rd PCTL)
General Engineering 174/302 (42nd PCTL)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 93/150 (38th PCTL)
Environmental Engineering 123/184 (33rd PCTL)
Management Science and Operations Research 142/198 (28th PCTL)
Information Systems 281/379 (25th PCTL)
 
Scopus
SNIP
0.686

2021  
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
7
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,199
Scimago Quartile Score Engineering (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Information Systems (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1,2
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Architecture 48/149 (Q2)
General Engineering 186/300 (Q3)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 79/124 (Q3)
Environmental Engineering 118/173 (Q3)
Management Science and Operations Research 141/184 (Q4)
Information Systems 274/353 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,457

2020  
Scimago
H-index
5
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,165
Scimago
Quartile Score
Engineering (miscellaneous) Q3
Environmental Engineering Q4
Information Systems Q4
Management Science and Operations Research Q4
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
102/116=0,9
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
General Engineering 205/297 (Q3)
Environmental Engineering 107/146 (Q3)
Information Systems 269/329 (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research 139/166 (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 64/98 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,26
Scopus
Cites
57
Scopus
Documents
36
Days from submission to acceptance 84
Days from acceptance to publication 348
Acceptance
Rate

23%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
4
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,229
Scimago
Quartile Score
Engineering (miscellaneous) Q2
Environmental Engineering Q3
Information Systems Q3
Management Science and Operations Research Q4
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
46/81=0,6
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
General Engineering 227/299 (Q4)
Environmental Engineering 107/132 (Q4)
Information Systems 259/300 (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research 136/161 (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 60/86 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,866
Scopus
Cites
35
Scopus
Documents
47
Acceptance
Rate
21%

 

International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering
Publication Model Gold Open Access
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 1100 EUR/article
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Limited number of full waiver available. Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription Information Gold Open Access

International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2010
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
3
Founder Debreceni Egyetem
Founder's
Address
H-4032 Debrecen, Hungary Egyetem tér 1
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2062-0810 (Print)
ISSN 2063-4269 (Online)

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Oct 2023 0 136 48
Nov 2023 0 55 19
Dec 2023 0 302 53
Jan 2024 0 145 23
Feb 2024 0 257 15
Mar 2024 0 180 22
Apr 2024 0 59 8