Authors:
B. Kirubadurai Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Vel Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sagunthala R&D Institute of Science & Technology, Chennai, India

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K. Kanagaraja Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajalakshmi Institute of Technology, Chennai, India

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G. Jegadeeswari Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, AMET Deemed to be University, Chennai, India

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T. Kumaran Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Vel Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sagunthala R&D Institute of Science & Technology, Chennai, India

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Abstract

A heat pipe is a heat conduction program that utilizes both heat permeability and regime shift concepts to transport heat effectively between 2 different lines. A heat pipe is made up of a pipe or tube and a base fluid. In practice, the heat pipe is poured into a mould that is compatible with the cooling media. These devices have found uses in a variety of fields, including space apparatus, solar energy systems, electronic equipment, and air conditioning systems, due to their simplicity of design and ease of manufacture and maintenance. Thermal performance improvement being the major concern in our project we researched different techniques. The heating surface area has a direct impact on heat transfer. Therefore, we have focused on heat enhancement by introducing grooves. Alongside we also considered using different materials for the pipe. At the end of our research, we are going to produce groove structure models with different materials and analyze them using ANSYS software and propose the best structures with highest thermal efficiency for different applications of heat pipes. This is an attempt to increase heat transmission in response to various material and structural changes. Heat transmission is improved with grooved heat pipes as well as heat transmission various with different types materials used in heat pipe.

Abstract

A heat pipe is a heat conduction program that utilizes both heat permeability and regime shift concepts to transport heat effectively between 2 different lines. A heat pipe is made up of a pipe or tube and a base fluid. In practice, the heat pipe is poured into a mould that is compatible with the cooling media. These devices have found uses in a variety of fields, including space apparatus, solar energy systems, electronic equipment, and air conditioning systems, due to their simplicity of design and ease of manufacture and maintenance. Thermal performance improvement being the major concern in our project we researched different techniques. The heating surface area has a direct impact on heat transfer. Therefore, we have focused on heat enhancement by introducing grooves. Alongside we also considered using different materials for the pipe. At the end of our research, we are going to produce groove structure models with different materials and analyze them using ANSYS software and propose the best structures with highest thermal efficiency for different applications of heat pipes. This is an attempt to increase heat transmission in response to various material and structural changes. Heat transmission is improved with grooved heat pipes as well as heat transmission various with different types materials used in heat pipe.

Introduction

A heat pipe is a tubular system that uses a metal tube to hold the liquid under pressure and is extremely efficient at transmitting heat. A heat pipe is a tubular system that is very efficient in transmitting heat, using a metal container that holds the liquid under pressure, and the inner layer of the tube is lined with a porous material that functions as a wick [1, 2, 5]. The idea is the same in a heat pipe, which is made up of several wicks. The liquid evaporates into a gas, which travels to the pipe's cooler before reverting to a liquid and passing through the wick. So, by just using TPCL length, we can see how to optimize the wick shape [3, 4, 9]. We can see how to optimize the filament form just by using the TPCL distance. We know that heat pipes are very efficient at transferring heat, so they are used to allow use of all the thermal superconductor property by allowing for a high heat transfer rate, which allows the device ideal for a more range of applications and industrial works [7, 10, 15]. The inclusion of heat pipes to a variety of temperature scales and applications is a direct indicator of the technology's ability. The implementation's economic analysis showed a net annual energy savings of 134 MWh, with a one-month operating payback period (Fig. 1) [6, 8, 11].

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Basic design of heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

We are even aware of the thermal transfer limitations of the heat pipe. There are various constraints on heat pipes, such as the base fluid, the structure of the wick, the dimensions and the temperature at which it is operated. There are also capillary constraints that create capillary distinctions around the liquid-vapour interfaces in the inlet and outlet [9, 11, 12]. Similarly, there are other limitations such as sonic limitation, limitation of entrainment, limitation of boiling, and heat pipe performance depends on the heat pipe groove width with grooved capillary structure [13, 14, 16]. All these limitations depend on the fluid properties of the thermos, the parameters of the wick and the heat pipe.

Heat pipe design

There are many factors to consider when building a heat pipe. Material properties, working limit, heat pipe length and diameter, power limitation, heat pipe transport limitation, thermal resistance, heat pipe bending and flattening effects, and operating orientation all receive significant attention [17, 18, 19] However, by specifying the types of copper/water, the design problems are reduced to a few key considerations. The amount of energy that the heat pipe will bear is perhaps the most major determinant [20, 21, 24, 26]. Another consideration is the temperature range under which the individual working fluid will function. To avoid contaminating the environment or causing a chemical reaction, this working fluid requires a compatible vessel content. Assume that both heat pipes are made of copper and have the same length and diameter of 60 and 3 mm, orderly. The formula is used to measure the rate of heat transfer [22, 23, 25, 26].

The conventional heat pipe: Here is an example of a general heat pipe with a sintered powder wick structure. The heat pipe is depicted in three dimensions below. The inner circle of the heat pipe has a diameter of 10 mm and a length of 200 mm (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Foundational heat pipe design

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Grooved heat pipe: Using the concept of increasing the surface area, we introduced grooves over the inner walls of the pipe. This wick structure basically not only improves the capillary forces but also increases the surface area which results in increase of heat transfer and overall thermal efficiency of the heat pipe (Tables 1 3, Figs 3 and 4).

Table 1.

Material operating temperature

Material Operating temperature (K) Operating temperature (°C)
Foundational Grooved Foundational Grooved
Aluminum 284.35–366.20 284.41–414.74 11.2–93.05 11.26–41.59
Copper 283.29–374.37 282.41–421.12 10.14–101.22 9.26–147.97
Steel 296.86–313.24 295.02–336.19 23.71–40.09 21.87–63.04
Table 2.

Properties of heat pipe

Location Boundary Momentum Thermal
Insulated region Wall Shear state of a static wall – zero slide Heat flux – 0
Cold region Wall Shear state of a static wall – zero slide Constant temperature
Hot region Wall Shear state of a static wall – zero slide Constant heat flux
Table 3.

The numerical analysis parameters

Variable Characterization
Kind of flow Laminar
Duration 0.0001 s
Heat content 2455 kJ/kg
Temperature of saturation 373.15 K
Criteria of convergence 10−3 Pressure velocity
Association Simple
Schemes of discretization First order upwind
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Grooved heat pipe design

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Dimensions of heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Methodology in mathematics

Flow and heat transfer equations that govern flow and heat transmission

The volume of fluid (VOF) technique is utilised when there are particularly in non-source liquids. The stationary and non-stationary circumstances aspect of almost any gas/liquid operating is crucial when the operating liquids functionality is relevant. The scientific formula for the VOF model is similar.
t ( α v ρ v ) + . ( α v ρ v u v ) = S M
l = 1 n α 1 = 1

Equations of momentum (Navier-Stokes equations)

The mobility formulas in the amount of liquid method, as shown below, are focused on the quantity of densities and friction factor in term of phases weight fractions.
t ( ρ u ) + . ( ρ u u ) = P + ρ g + . [ μ ( u + u T ) ] + F
ρ = α l ρ l + α v ρ v
μ = α l μ l + α v μ v
where F is the outside force that acts on the coolants, g is gravity movement, and P is pressure.
To compensate for the surface tension effects of cryopreservation, the uniformly distributed force (CSF) approach is employed in combination with Black bill's mathematical model as follows:
F c s = p a i r s i j , i < j σ i j ( α i ρ i C i α i + α i ρ j C j α j ) ( ρ i + ρ j ) / 2

The energy equation in volume of fluid (VOF) form is as follows:

The energy equation in (VOF)
t ( ρ C p T ) + . [ u ( ρ C p T + P ) ] = . ( k T ) + S E
where SE denotes the energy equation's source term. Thermal conductivity, denoted by k, is computed as follows:
k = α l k l + α v k v
The mass-averaged variables, i.e., the energy term (E), are given by the equation below.
E = α l ρ l E l + α v ρ v E v α l ρ l + α v ρ v

The mass-averaged variables, i.e. the energy term, are given by the following equation (E).

Boundary condition

The condenser portion has a constant wall temperature at thermal boundary conditions, whereas the evaporator has varying heat loads for each filling ratio. The wall motion is stationary in the momentum boundary condition (Fig. 5).

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Sequence of applying boundary condition

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Meshing

ANSYS Meshing allows you to specify combinations of point elements, edge controls, surface controls, and/or body controls, giving you additional control. They each have their own set of choices and can be used to change the mesh in a variety of ways. Throughout this scenario, the automatic mesh form approach is applied, but the mesh sizing is done manually. The upper and lower mesh size restrictions are both set to 0.0002 m, as seen in the diagram below. When you use this control level, you will obtain a mesh with 61,1,65 nodes and 5,66,244 elements (Fig. 6).

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Meshing of heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Fluent solution setup

The procedures in this project include setting up the FLUENT solver and simulating the flow. Set up the solver by going to Materials > Selecting a solid and clicking Edit. Use the properties listed in Table 4 to make changes to the solid's properties.

Table 4.

Properties of solid material

Property Aluminum Steel Copper
Density (kg m−3) 2,700 7,750–8,050 8,960
Thermal conductivity (W (m−1⋅k−1) 237 54 401
Boiling point 2,743 700–1800 2,835
Molar heat capacity J (mol−1·k−1) 24.2 0.466 24.44

Results and discussion

For each variant, various parameters such as density, temperature, and velocity were measured and compared. The effect of the evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser temperature are investigated in this simple heat pipe model with water as the heat exchanger and aluminum as the material (Table 5 and Fig. 7).

Table 5.

Properties of fluid

Point of boiling 100.00 °C
Limited density (at 3.98 °C) 1,000 kg m−3
Density (25 °C) 99.701 kg m−3
Pressure of vapour (25 °C) 23.75 Torr
Vaporization heat (100 °C) 40.65 KJ/mole
Vaporization entropy (25 °C) 118.8 J/°C mol
Viscosity 0.8903 Centipoise
Surface tension (25 °C) 0.7197 Dyn/meter
Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Temperature distribution in conventional steel heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Conventional copper heat pipe has been analyzed and observed temperatures ranged with a minimum of 284.35 K and a maximum of 366.20 K. The effect of temperature in fluid zone, evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser is examined using with water as the heat transfer fluid and copper as the material. Conventional aluminum heat pipe has been analyzed and observed Temperatures ranged with a minimal of 282.41 K and a peak of 374.37 K. The result of temperature in fluid zone, evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser is examined using water as the cooling medium and steel as the material. Conventional steel heat pipe has been analyzed and observed in temperatures with a minimum of 296.86 K and a maximum of 313.24 K. The effect of temperature in fluid zone, evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser is examined using with water as the working fluid and steel as the material (Fig. 8).

Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

Distribution of temperature in grooved steel heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Grooved copper heat pipe has been analyzed and observed in temperatures ranged with a minimum of 284.41 K and a maximum of 414.74 K. The effect of temperature in fluid zone, evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser is examined using water as the base fluid. Grooved aluminum heat pipe has been analyzed and observed in temperatures ranged with a minimum of 283.29 K and a maximum of 421.12 K. The effect of temperature in fluid zone, evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser is examined using water as the base fluid. Grooved copper heat pipe has been analyzed and observed in temperatures ranged with a minimum of 295.02 K and a maximum of 336.19 K. The effect of temperature in fluid zone, evaporator, adiabatic wall, and condenser is examined using water as the base fluid (Fig. 9).

Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Velocity stream in grooved heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Velocity influence in a heat pipe

A considerable extra heat is deposited on the bottom surface, which would be usually referred to as the liquid desiccant region. The simulation output for the vapour – phase pathway's evaporated portion is a red outline that turns bluish in the collection region. The speed applicable at the bottom vapour – phase path hugely puts more pressure of warm air at the drying segment, and heat was gradually diffused from the drying stage to the moderate frozen phase at the test section (green contour), and eventually to the coloured curves at the chiller segment. Later, as shown by the blue outline, the heat pipe's activity has caused the hot fluid to settle (Fig. 10).

Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

Pressure variation in grooved heat pipe

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Influence of pressure in heat pipe

The overall pressure contour demonstrates that the heat is spread equitably. Because of the green contour of the evaporation portion, the adiabatic section has a light blue contour, and the condensing section has a dark blue contour. The air particles smash smoothly because the container's surface area is greater than the vapour phase path. Even if the vapour path remains warm, the atmosphere at the container's interior surface is warm. Because the pressure is not dangerous, the structure does not break or fracture (Fig. 11, Tables 6 and 7).

Fig. 11.
Fig. 11.

Temperature variation with phase of base fluid

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Table 6.

Parameter changes in grooved heat pipe

S. No Parameter Inlet Evaporative section Adiabatic section Condenser section Outlet
Water- steel Temperature (K) 311 420.3 380.6 300 287
Pressure (Pascal) 14,680 11,809 8,817 4,499 1,680
Density (kg m−3) 996.2 888.6 889.2 979.2 988
Velocity (m s−1) 0.1 1.488 1.784 2.17 2.24
Turbulence (m2 s−2) 0.057 0.15 0.513 0.724 0.799
Water -copper Temperature (K) 309 421.1 391.6 322.7 312
Pressure (Pascal) 14,640 16,620 15,100 6,042 1,510
Density (kg m−3) 998.2 893.5 892.5 978.2 989
Velocity (m s−1) 0.1 0.23 0.26 0.28 0.3
Turbulence (m2 s−2) 0.05 0.158 0.334 0.490 0.5
Water -aluminum Temperature (K) 310 419.3 379.6 297 283
Pressure (Pascal) 14,569 12,910 8,606 4,303 1,430
Density (kg m−3) 998.2 898.5 898.5 998.2 999
Velocity (m s−1) 0.1 1.267 1.934 2.04 2.3
Turbulence (m2 s−2) 0.06 0.12 0.468 0.689 0.8
Table 7.

Parameter changes in conventional heat pipe

S. No. Parameter Inlet Evaporative section Adiabatic section Condenser

section
Outlet
Water- steel Temperature (K) 309 370.3 330.54 297.4 305
Pressure (Pascal) 14,545 10,450 9,679 9,760 9,853
Density (kg m−3) 995.7 978.6 989.2 997.2 999.6
Velocity (m s−1) 0.1 1.634 1.784 1.19 1.37
Turbulence (m2 s−2) 0.043 0.015 0.213 0.224 0.399
Water -copper Temperature (K) 310 381.4 374.6 352.6 298
Pressure (Pascal) 14,621 10,620 10,100 8,042 1,610
Density (kg m−3) 997.8 894.3 894.3 988.7 989
Velocity (m s−1) 0.1 1.73 1.88 1.99 2.10
Turbulence (m2 s−2) 0.053 0.158 0.189 0.246 0.364
Water -aluminum Temperature (K) 309 382.4 368.6 317 288
Pressure (Pascal) 14,550 10,913 9,706 5,103 1,253
Density (kg m−3) 999.2 897.5 898.5 998.2 999
Velocity (m s−1) 0.1 0.267 0.934 1.04 1.1
Turbulence (m2 s−2) 0.064 0.14 0.26 0.48 0.6

Influence of temperature in heat pipe

Per the temperature profiles studies, the heat pipe finally implemented heated vapour to trapped moisture. This analysis proved that somehow a narrow tube with an inherent wick arrangement enables for heating and cooling inside the tube, due to heat transference from the heating to the chilled side. As can be observed, the heat is symmetrical. It shows that the vapour stage has a conductivity, resulting in a high heat flux. The aldol condensation contracts energy in the regenerator, changing it to contracted gas, which would be then turned into a fluid. For its capacity to withstand extreme temps, copper has proven to be a good preference for pipe building projects.

Temperature data received at various axial intervals on the heat pipe core is used to construct axisymmetric heat flux. Figure shows the axial temperature field along the heat pipe during a dry run. The graphic depicts the temperature variations in the evaporator, adiabatic section, and condenser because of variations for a dry run. The slope of longitudinal temperature field rises as heat input increases, resulting in higher temperature swings throughout the condenser and evaporator sections, as seen in Fig. 12. A bigger temperature slope is necessary for increased heat transmission in simple conduction heat transfer. In comparison to another category, the copper-water combination HP has T max at the evaporative section.

Fig. 12.
Fig. 12.

Temperature variation Vs length of HP

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Figure 13 depicts the pressure variation in the symmetry plane of a real heat transfer tube. The pressure variations in the non-grooved model are not nearly as similar as those in the grooved model, as seen in Fig. 13. As the pressure decreases, the dispersion becomes more uniform. Fluid losses grow as the actual heat pipe model includes condenser elements.

Fig. 13.
Fig. 13.

Pressure variation Vs length of HP

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Figure 14 depicts the distribution of density drops inside a heat pipe. For the capillary force to push the vapour, the wick's capillary pressure must be greater than the pressure differential between the vapour and the liquid at the evaporator. The graph also shows that the liquid density lowers higher when the heat pipe is operated against gravity. As a result, wick pumping and heat transfer are reduced. The degree of heat transfer reduction is determined by the heat pipe.

Fig. 14.
Fig. 14.

Density variation Vs length of HP

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Figure 15 depicts the variation in HP's real heat transfer velocity. The exact velocity profile inside of an exact tube's outer tube is primarily the same as before the inside of a purely theoretical pipe's circular area, per this trend line; just one thing that is different is the motion scattering in the internal liquid; the impacts of grippy rubber give flow velocity into the inflatable raft, enhancing the rinsing impacts of the interior layer, and enhancing the heat transfer (Fig. 16).

Fig. 15.
Fig. 15.

Velocity variation Vs length of HP

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Fig. 16.
Fig. 16.

Turbulence variation Vs length of HP

Citation: International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering 2022; 10.1556/1848.2022.00380

Because of the propped section, turbulence in grooved heat pipe is slightly higher than in regular heat pipe, resulting in flow limitation. There will be turbulence as a result. The outflow will have more turbulence due to the grooved section. In a conventional heat pipe, the line graph was plotted for aluminum, copper, and steel with their working circumstances. In a grooved heat pipe, the line graph was plotted for aluminum, copper, and steel with their working circumstances. As we can clearly see the difference between the conventional heat pipe and the grooved heat pipe, we note that the maximum temperature values in the grooved heat pipe are noticeably greater than those in the conventional heat pipe when transmitting heat.

Conclusion

The effect of the groove, condensation and evaporation zone material, and cooling temperature on the homologous latent heat and nonlinear thermal of a twisted copper-water, aluminum-water, and steel-water heat pipe was critically examined. It was also investigated how heat and operation circumstances affect the immediate thermal characteristics of a twisty heat pipe. The crucial heat flow increases as the refrigeration temperature rises, but the heat transfer seen between chiller stays relatively consistent. Irrespectively of the chilling degree, the necessary heat flow skyrockets when the size of the exchanger is decreased in half. The crucial heat flux, on the other side, enhances noticeably as the evaporation planet warms above 50 °C. Greater roasting and chilling times enhance the comparable heat capacity. The rising length influences heat conductivity more than the precipitation area height. When heat is applied to a twisted wire heat pipe, the heats of the evaporate, isothermal, and condensing zones rise in order, after the warmth of the drying oven grows. The heat input is switched off, the twist heat pipe takes longer to recover to its original position than it does at start-up. Heat transfer is also efficient with copper-water combination heat pipes.

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    M. Shafiey Dehaja , M.Z. Mohiabadi , “Experimental investigation of heat pipe solar collector using MgO nanofluids,” Published on 2018 by Elsevier B.V, 10.1016, vol. 191, March 2019, pp. 9199.

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    S. Shittu , G. Li , X. Zhao , Y.G. Akhlaghi , X. Ma , M. Yu , “Comparative study of a concentrated photovoltaic-thermoelectric system with and without flat plate heat pipe,” Published on 2019 by Elsevier Ltd,10.1016, vol. 193, 1 August 2019, pp. 114.

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    M.M. Sarafraz , O. Pourmehran , B. Yang , M. Arjomandi , “Assessment of the thermal performance of a thermosyphon heat pipe using zirconia-acetone nanofluids,” Published online on 19 January 2019,10.1016, vol. 136, June 2019, pp. 884895.

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    M. Kaya , A.E. Gurel , U. Agbulut , İ. Ceylan , S. Çelik , A. Ergün , B. Acar , “Performance analysis of using CuO-Methanol nanofluid in a hybrid system with concentrated air collector and vacuum tube heat pipe,” Published online on 22 August 2019, 10.1016, vol. 199, 1 November 2019, 111936.

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    A. Wei , J. Qu , H. Qiu , C. Wang , G. Cao , “Heat transfer characteristics of plug-in oscillating heat pipe with binary-fluid mixtures for electric vehicle battery thermal management,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, vol. 135, June 2019, pp. 746760, 2019,10.1016.

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    H. Maddaha , M. Ghazvinib , M. Hossein Ahmadic , “Predicting the efficiency of CuO/water nanofluid in heat pipe heat exchanger using neural network,” Int. Commun. Heat Mass Transfer, vol. 104, no. 2019, May 2019, pp. 3340, 10.1016,Volume 104.

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    A. Shafieian , M. Khiadani , A. Nosrati , “Strategies to improve the thermal performance of heat pipe solar collectors in solar systems,” Energ. Convers. Manag., vol. 183, no. 2019, 1 March 2019, pp. 307331, 10.1016.

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    A. Wei , J. Qu , H. Qiu , C. Wang , G. Cao , “Heat transfer characteristics of plug-in oscillating heat pipe with binary-fluid mixtures for electric vehicle battery thermal management,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer., vol. 135, no. 2019, June 2019, pp. 746760, 10.1016.

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    T.M.O. Diallo , M. Yu , J. Zhou , X. Zhao , S. Shittu , G. Li , J. Ji , D. Hardy , “Energy performance analysis of a novel solar PVT loop heat pipe employing a microchannel heat pipe evaporator and a PCM triple heat exchanger,” vol. 167, 15 January 2019, pp. 866888, Published on 2018, 10.1016.

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    A. Sözena , M. Gürüb , A. Khanlaric , E. Çiftçia , “Experimental and numerical study on enhancement of heat transfer characteristics of a heat pipe utilizing aqueous clinoptilolite nanofluid,” Available online 21 June 2019,10.1016, Vol. 160, September 2019, 114001.

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    J. Qua , Q. Sun , H. Wang , D. Zhang , J. Yuan , “Performance characteristics of flat-plate oscillating heat pipe with porous metal-foam wicks,” 2019 Elsevier Ltd, 10.1016, vol. 137, July 2019, pp. 2030.

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    Q. Su , S. Chang , M. Song , Y. Zhao , C. Dang , “An experimental study on the heat transfer performance of a loop heat pipe system with ethanol-water mixture as working fluid for aircraft anti-icing,” Available online from 11 May 2019,10.1016, vol. 139, August 2019, pp. 280292.

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    Y.H. Diaoa , L. Lianga , Y.H. Zhaoa , Z.Y. Wanga , F.W. Baib , “Numerical investigation of the thermal performance enhancement of latent heat thermal energy storage using longitudinal rectangular fins and flat micro-heat pipe arrays,” 2018 Elsevier Ltd, 10.1016, vols 233–234, 1 January 2019, pp. 894905.

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    J. Song , Y. Bi , S. Liu , G. Zhong , C. Wang , J. Wang , S. Song , “An experimental and engineering application of an active snow-melting system for highways based on heat-pipe technology,” IOP Publishing on 2019, 10.1088.

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    S.V. Channapattana , S.B. Raut , A.A. Pawar , S. Campli , S.S. Sarnobat , T. Dey , “Heat transfer performance analysis of screen mesh wick heat pipe using CuO nano fluid,” Published on March 3, 2019,10.1055, vols 233–234, 1 January 2019, pp. 894905.

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    M. Shafiey Dehaja , M.Z. Mohiabadi , “Experimental investigation of heat pipe solar collector using MgO nanofluids,” Published on 2018 by Elsevier B.V, 10.1016, vol. 191, March 2019, pp. 9199.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [23]

    S. Shittu , G. Li , X. Zhao , Y.G. Akhlaghi , X. Ma , M. Yu , “Comparative study of a concentrated photovoltaic-thermoelectric system with and without flat plate heat pipe,” Published on 2019 by Elsevier Ltd,10.1016, vol. 193, 1 August 2019, pp. 114.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [24]

    M.M. Sarafraz , O. Pourmehran , B. Yang , M. Arjomandi , “Assessment of the thermal performance of a thermosyphon heat pipe using zirconia-acetone nanofluids,” Published online on 19 January 2019,10.1016, vol. 136, June 2019, pp. 884895.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [25]

    M. Kaya , A.E. Gurel , U. Agbulut , İ. Ceylan , S. Çelik , A. Ergün , B. Acar , “Performance analysis of using CuO-Methanol nanofluid in a hybrid system with concentrated air collector and vacuum tube heat pipe,” Published online on 22 August 2019, 10.1016, vol. 199, 1 November 2019, 111936.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [26]

    A. Wei , J. Qu , H. Qiu , C. Wang , G. Cao , “Heat transfer characteristics of plug-in oscillating heat pipe with binary-fluid mixtures for electric vehicle battery thermal management,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, vol. 135, June 2019, pp. 746760, 2019,10.1016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Ákos, Lakatos University of Debrecen (Hungary)

Founder, former Editor-in-Chief (2011-2020): Ferenc Kalmár University of Debrecen (Hungary)

Founding Editor: György Csomós University of Debrecen (Hungary)

Associate Editor: Derek Clements Croome University of Reading (UK)

Associate Editor: Dezső Beke University of Debrecen (Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Mohammad Nazir AHMAD Institute of Visual Informatics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia

    Murat BAKIROV Center for Materials and Lifetime Management Ltd. Moscow Russia

    Nicolae BALC Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Cluj-Napoca Romania

    Umberto BERARDI Ryerson University Toronto Canada

    Ildikó BODNÁR University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Sándor BODZÁS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Fatih Mehmet BOTSALI Selçuk University Konya Turkey

    Samuel BRUNNER Empa Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

    István BUDAI University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Constantin BUNGAU University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    Michele De CARLI University of Padua Padua Italy

    Robert CERNY Czech Technical University in Prague Czech Republic

    György CSOMÓS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Tamás CSOKNYAI Budapest University of Technology and Economics Budapest Hungary

    Eugen Ioan GERGELY University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    József FINTA University of Pécs Pécs Hungary

    Anna FORMICA IASI National Research Council Rome

    Alexandru GACSADI University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    Eric A. GRULKE University of Kentucky Lexington United States

    Janez GRUM University of Ljubljana Ljubljana Slovenia

    Géza HUSI University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Ghaleb A. HUSSEINI American University of Sharjah Sharjah United Arab Emirates

    Nikolay IVANOV Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University St. Petersburg Russia

    Antal JÁRAI Eötvös Loránd University Budapest Hungary

    Gudni JÓHANNESSON The National Energy Authority of Iceland Reykjavik Iceland

    László KAJTÁR Budapest University of Technology and Economics Budapest Hungary

    Ferenc KALMÁR University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Tünde KALMÁR University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Milos KALOUSEK Brno University of Technology Brno Czech Republik

    Jan KOCI Czech Technical University in Prague Prague Czech Republic

    Vaclav KOCI Czech Technical University in Prague Prague Czech Republic

    Imra KOCSIS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Imre KOVÁCS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Éva LOVRA Univesity of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Tamás MANKOVITS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Igor MEDVED Slovak Technical University in Bratislava Bratislava Slovakia

    Ligia MOGA Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Cluj-Napoca Romania

    Marco MOLINARI Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm Sweden

    Henrieta MORAVCIKOVA Slovak Academy of Sciences Bratislava Slovakia

    Phalguni MUKHOPHADYAYA University of Victoria Victoria Canada

    Balázs NAGY Budapest University of Technology and Economics Budapest Hungary

    Husam S. NAJM Rutgers University New Brunswick United States

    Jozsef NYERS Subotica Tech College of Applied Sciences Subotica Serbia

    Bjarne W. OLESEN Technical University of Denmark Lyngby Denmark

    Stefan ONIGA North University of Baia Mare Baia Mare Romania

    Joaquim Norberto PIRES Universidade de Coimbra Coimbra Portugal

    László POKORÁDI Óbuda University Budapest Hungary

    Antal PUHL University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Roman RABENSEIFER Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava Bratislava Slovak Republik

    Mohammad H. A. SALAH Hashemite University Zarqua Jordan

    Dietrich SCHMIDT Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology IWES Kassel Germany

    Lorand SZABÓ Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Cluj-Napoca Romania

    Csaba SZÁSZ Technical University of Cluj-Napoca Cluj-Napoca Romania

    Ioan SZÁVA Transylvania University of Brasov Brasov Romania

    Péter SZEMES University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Edit SZŰCS University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Radu TARCA University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    Zsolt TIBA University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    László TÓTH University of Debrecen Debrecen Hungary

    Anton TRNIK Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra Nitra Slovakia

    Ibrahim UZMAY Erciyes University Kayseri Turkey

    Tibor VESSELÉNYI University of Oradea Oradea Romania

    Nalinaksh S. VYAS Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur India

    Deborah WHITE The University of Adelaide Adelaide Australia

    Sahin YILDIRIM Erciyes University Kayseri Turkey

International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering
Address of the institute: Faculty of Engineering, University of Debrecen
H-4028 Debrecen, Ótemető u. 2-4. Hungary
Email: irase@eng.unideb.hu

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2021  
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
7
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,199
Scimago Quartile Score Engineering (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Information Systems (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1,2
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Architecture 48/149 (Q2)
General Engineering 186/300 (Q3)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 79/124 (Q3)
Environmental Engineering 118/173 (Q3)
Management Science and Operations Research 141/184 (Q4)
Information Systems 274/353 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,457

2020  
Scimago
H-index
5
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,165
Scimago
Quartile Score
Engineering (miscellaneous) Q3
Environmental Engineering Q4
Information Systems Q4
Management Science and Operations Research Q4
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
102/116=0,9
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
General Engineering 205/297 (Q3)
Environmental Engineering 107/146 (Q3)
Information Systems 269/329 (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research 139/166 (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 64/98 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,26
Scopus
Cites
57
Scopus
Documents
36
Days from submission to acceptance 84
Days from acceptance to publication 348
Acceptance
Rate

23%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
4
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,229
Scimago
Quartile Score
Engineering (miscellaneous) Q2
Environmental Engineering Q3
Information Systems Q3
Management Science and Operations Research Q4
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
46/81=0,6
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
General Engineering 227/299 (Q4)
Environmental Engineering 107/132 (Q4)
Information Systems 259/300 (Q4)
Management Science and Operations Research 136/161 (Q4)
Materials Science (miscellaneous) 60/86 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,866
Scopus
Cites
35
Scopus
Documents
47
Acceptance
Rate
21%

 

International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering
Publication Model Gold Open Access
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 1100 EUR/article
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Limited number of full waiver available. Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription Information Gold Open Access

International Review of Applied Sciences and Engineering
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2010
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
3
Founder Debreceni Egyetem
Founder's
Address
H-4032 Debrecen, Hungary Egyetem tér 1
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2062-0810 (Print)
ISSN 2063-4269 (Online)

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