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  • 1 Philipps University-Marburg Department of Dermatology and Allergology Baldingerstrasse D-35033 Marburg Germany
  • | 2 University Hospital Aachen Department of Internal Medicine III Aachen Germany
  • | 3 Otto-von-Guericke University Institute of Medical Microbiology Magdeburg Germany
Open access

Monocytes are important cell types of the innate immune system. Recent scientific evidence suggests that monocytes not only play a crucial role in our innate immune system by defending the host from intruding microbial pathogens but they also contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of diseases such as liver fibrosis, atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and tumor metastasis. In addition, monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages play a crucial beneficial role in the liver fibrosis regression, muscle regeneration, and the clearance of the β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we summarize the origin, plasticity, and pathogenic potential of monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages, as well as their positive role in the regression of some common diseases. Elucidating the comprehensive immunological role of monocytes will provide therapeutic advantages in either controlling disease progression or favoring the regression of the disease state.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Dunay, Ildiko Rita

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Heimesaat, Markus M.

Vice Editor(s)-in-Chief: Fuchs, Anja

Editorial Board

Chair of the Editorial Board:
Jeffrey S. Buguliskis (Thomas Jefferson University, USA)

  • Jörn Albring (University of Münster, Germany)
  • Stefan Bereswill (Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Germany)
  • Dunja Bruder (University of Megdeburg, Germany)
  • Jan Buer (University of Duisburg, Germany)
  • Jeff Buguliskis (Thomas Jefferson University, USA)
  • Edit Buzas (Semmelweis University, Hungary)
  • Charles Collyer (University of Sydney, Australia)
  • Renato Damatta (UENF, Brazil)
  • Ivelina Damjanova (Semmelweis University, Hungary)
  • Maria Deli (Biological Research Center, HAS, Hungary)
  • Olgica Djurković-Djaković (University of Belgrade, Serbia)
  • Jean-Dennis Docquier (University of Siena, Italy)
  • Anna Erdei (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Zsuzsanna Fabry (University of Washington, USA)
  • Beniam Ghebremedhin (Witten/Herdecke University, Germany)
  • Nancy Guillen (Institute Pasteur, France)
  • Georgina L. Hold (University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom)
  • Ralf Ignatius (Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Germany)
  • Zsuzsanna Izsvak (MDC-Berlin, Germany)
  • Achim Kaasch (University of Cologne, Germany)
  • Tamás Laskay (University of Lübeck, Germany)
  • Oliver Liesenfeld (Roche, USA)
  • Shreemanta Parida (Vaccine Grand Challenge Program, India)
  • Matyas Sandor (University of Wisconsin, USA)
  • Ulrich Steinhoff (University of Marburg, Germany)
  • Michal Toborek (University of Miami, USA)
  • Mary Jo Wick (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)
  • Susanne A. Wolf (MDC-Berlin, Germany)

 

Dr. Dunay, Ildiko Rita
Magdeburg, Germany
E-mail: ildikodunay@gmail.com

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Language English
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