Authors:
Ewelina Kowalewska Department of Psychiatry, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, Warsaw, Poland

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Beáta Bőthe Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur les problèmes conjugaux et les agressions sexuelles (CRIPCAS), Canada
Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada

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Shane W. Kraus Department of Psychology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA

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Abstract

The current understanding of compulsive sexual behavior disorder (CSBD) is primarily based on studies involving non-clinical samples of heterosexual men, resulting in significant gaps in knowledge regarding women with CSBD. The commentary highlights the domains where further research is necessary, including incidence and prevalence, etiology, diagnostic criteria, comorbidities, sexual patterns, personality profiles, and barriers to help-seeking among women with CSBD. Bridging this research gap is essential for improving clinical care, developing tailored interventions, and increasing awareness about CSBD in women among healthcare providers, policymakers, and the general public.

Abstract

The current understanding of compulsive sexual behavior disorder (CSBD) is primarily based on studies involving non-clinical samples of heterosexual men, resulting in significant gaps in knowledge regarding women with CSBD. The commentary highlights the domains where further research is necessary, including incidence and prevalence, etiology, diagnostic criteria, comorbidities, sexual patterns, personality profiles, and barriers to help-seeking among women with CSBD. Bridging this research gap is essential for improving clinical care, developing tailored interventions, and increasing awareness about CSBD in women among healthcare providers, policymakers, and the general public.

Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder (CSBD) in the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) (6C72; WHO, 2022) is characterized as a persistent pattern of failure to control intense, repetitive sexual impulses or urges resulting in repetitive sexual behavior, which persist for over six months and cause marked distress or significant impairment in important areas of psychosocial functioning. For over four decades, vigorous scholarly debate has existed surrounding its etiology and biological underpinnings, which continues to date (Grubbs et al., 2020).

Although the new standardized definition of CSBD in ICD-11 is crucial for expanding access to healthcare for millions worldwide, its codification as a mental health disorder remains controversial. On the one hand, CSBD's inclusion in the ICD-11 provides an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to collect accurate data, which may result in developing relevant therapeutic interventions tailored to this population. On the other hand, it reveals the shortcomings of previous studies on this topic, particularly with regards to gender, sexual, and ethnic/racially diverse populations. As noted by several researchers in the field, nearly all the current knowledge on CSBD is based on data from primarily non-clinical samples of heterosexual men (Grubbs et al., 2020; Kowalewska, Gola, Kraus, & Lew-Starowicz, 2020). Simply put, it means that potential gender differences in risk and protective factors, CSBD symptoms severity, diagnosis, and possible treatments have rarely been fully considered, resulting in severe methodological shortcomings (e.g., lack of clinical interventions tailored to specific groups, lack of psychometrical evaluation of available instruments on women). It is important for clinicians and researchers to gain a more accurate understanding of how gender gaps in previous CSBD studies may impact the health and wellbeing of women living with CSBD. Through this letter, we would like to draw attention to this issue by highlighting the domains where further research on CSBD among women is necessary to improve both individual care and public health globally.

First, there is insufficient knowledge on the incidence and prevalence as well as the etiology of CSBD among women. In the case of incidence and prevalence, most studies have focused on male samples and used unstandardized assessment methods and a variety of indices of CSBD (Bőthe, Potenza, et al., 2020). Thus, available estimates of CSBD differ enormously between populations and the true proportion of women who experience CSBD may be substantially over- or underestimated (Kürbitz & Briken, 2021). After the release of the recommendations for future studies on CSBD among women put forth by Kowalewska et al. (2020), researchers have begun to tackle certain points raised by the authors. For example, some data on the frequency of clinically significant indications of CSBD has begun to emerge. Specifically, data on the occurrence of CSBD have been collected among community samples across 42 countries, genders, and sexual orientations as a part of the International Sex Survey (Bőthe et al., 2023). Studies on such numerous and culturally diverse populations will undoubtedly contribute to a deeper understanding of this condition. However, concerning the prevalence of CSBD, more research is needed involving large nationally representative samples, such as a study conducted on a probability-based German nationality sample (Briken et al., 2022). Regarding etiology, existing evidence suggests that men and women differ in many aspects of their sexuality (including reactivity, preferences, attitudes). Yet, the degree to which men, women, and gender-diverse individuals (identifying themselves with a gender outside of the man or woman dichotomy) experience similar or different CSBD symptomatology remains unclear.

Despite recent initiatives in the field (Bőthe et al., 2023), one of the most crucial issue remains around the need for in-depth psychometric evaluations of available instruments in terms of their validity and reliability in diagnosing CSBD symptoms in women, with a strong emphasis on establishing norms from clinical samples, which include adequate representation of women in clinical studies. Visible concentration on male participants in previous studies might have resulted in several unintended consequences. CSBD might exhibit distinct presentations in women as opposed to men, potentially resulting in the misinterpretation or oversight of symptoms specifically in women. Additionally, due to the unconventional manifestation of symptoms or inadequate understanding, CSBD in women might not be promptly diagnosed, leading to delayed treatment or misdiagnosis. Research on women with CSBD can help refine diagnostic criteria (which may not fully capture the symptoms and experiences unique to women), improve the clinical accuracy of assessment tools, and further prevent the underrecognition and underdiagnosis of this condition in women.

Furthermore, previous research on men revealed that CSBD often co-occurs with other psychiatric comorbidities such as depression, anxiety, and substance use disorders (Kaplan & Krueger, 2010; Kraus, Potenza, Martino, & Grant, 2015). Problematic pornography use coupled with compulsive masturbation have been shown to be the dominant clinical presentation of CSBD among men (Gola et al., 2018; Kafka, 2010; Reid, Carpenter, et al., 2012). Little is known about sexual patterns, co-occurrence with other mental disorders, personality profiles, as well as sexual function problems among women experiencing CSBD. Available data suggests that women view pornography less often than men and report lower rates of feeling urges to use pornographic materials (Kowalewska et al., 2020). However, it is important to note that certain reports indicate that a small subset of women also engages in frequent or risky use of pornography (e.g., Ballester-Arnal, Castro-Calvo, Gil-Llario, & Gil-Julia, 2017; Bőthe, Tóth-Király, et al., 2020). One of the few studies on women seeking treatment due to CSBD points to the need for further exploration of problematic pornography use as well as the number of past year sexual partners and frequency of past week masturbation, as potential risk factors or behavioral manifestations of CSBD (Kowalewska, Gola, Lew-Starowicz, & Kraus, 2022). Another comparison of treatment-seeking women with and without CSBD symptoms (assessed by self-report questionnaires) revealed significant inter-group differences in the frequency of the aforementioned behaviors, as well as the severity of depression and anxiety symptoms, and some aspects of impulsivity (Kowalewska, 2023). Previous studies have also shown that women with CSBD (as compared to men with CSBD) exhibited elevated levels of distrust toward others, decreased self-confidence and ambition, and a stronger preference for excitement and stimulation (Reid, Dhuffar, Parhami, & Fong, 2012). Moreover, empirical evidence and clinical observations indicate that women tend to report a higher frequency of childhood traumas and are more affected by attachment ruptures (McKeague, 2014). In future studies, it would be beneficial to focus on the potential psychological role of certain behaviors, its impact on relationships, and sexual and psychosocial functioning.

Apart from the better understanding of the clinical picture of women with CSBD, it is recommended that future research examine gender differences and/or similarities in neuronal mechanisms of CSBD, as well as genetic vulnerability factors for the development and maintenance of this disorder among women. Specifically, neuroimaging (Gola et al., 2017; Klucken et al., 2016; Voon et al., 2014) and genetic (e.g., Jokinen et al., 2017; Chatzittofis et al., 2016; Bostrom et al., 2019) research focusing on men with CSBD have unveiled partial similarities or shared characteristics akin to addiction disorders. Recognizing commonalities with extensively researched provides a framework for potentially more effective treatments and a deeper comprehension of CSBD, ultimately benefiting individuals affected by this condition.

Due to cultural norms and the social expectations around gender roles, women's sexual function problems have been underreported in clinical and research settings likely due to perceived shame and stigma. According to McKeague (2014), shame may serve as the primary emotional element of CSBD (referred to as sexual addiction in the past), and its impact is heightened for women due to negative cultural messages. The lack of adequate knowledge about the mechanisms of CSBD in women and the commonly prevailing stereotypes may diminish help seeking among women. For example, Kowalewska et al. (2022) reported that 68.2% of women had not sought treatment for CSBD in the past but reported significant levels of symptoms. These findings highlight the need to identify barriers for help seeking among women, particularly as it relates to the role of (lack of) social support in this group. Apart from the four possible barrier categories for women not seeking such treatment (i.e., individual, social, research, and treatment) that have been identified so far (Dhuffar & Griffiths, 2016), the emphasis should also be placed on factors such as age, marital status, race/ethnicity, religiosity, access to healthcare, and other comorbid mental health problems.

In conclusion, for many years, research on CSBD has predominantly focused on male participants, creating a substantial knowledge gap regarding its incidence, prevalence, clinical profile, as well as psychosocial, neuronal, and cultural factors contributing to the development and maintenance of CSBD among women. This lack of representation has resulted in several consequences. Initially, CSBD might exhibit distinct presentations in women as opposed to men, potentially resulting in the misinterpretation or oversight of symptoms specifically in women (e.g., women may engage more in interpersonal sexual activity, while men tend more toward solitary behaviors). Secondly, due to the unconventional manifestation of symptoms or inadequate understanding, CSBD in women might not be promptly diagnosed, leading to delayed treatment or misdiagnosis. Thirdly, the lack of adequate data on how women respond to therapies can create treatment disparities. Lastly, because of the reduced focus on gender-specific aspects of diseases in medical education, healthcare professionals may have limited awareness regarding certain conditions as they manifest in women. Addressing current research gaps will lead to significant improvements in understanding CSBD in women, facilitate clinical care by formulating practical implications (e.g., diagnosis, therapy, prevention) for clinical work in a more inclusive manner, and guide efforts to improve access and engagement in treatment. It can also help raise awareness among healthcare providers, policymakers, and the general public about the prevalence and impact of CSBD in women.

Funding sources

Shane W. Kraus received support from the Kindbridge Research Institute.

Authors' contribution

EK and SWK were responsible for the concept and writing the initial draft of this manuscript. EK, BB, and SWK were responsible for the editing, critical revisions, and approving the final version of the manuscript.

Conflict of interest

The authors report no conflicts of interest with respect to the content of this manuscript.

References

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    • Search Google Scholar
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bőthe, B., Potenza, M. N., Griffiths, M. D., Kraus, S. W., Klein, V., Fuss, J., & Demetrovics, Z. (2020). The development of the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder Scale (CSBD-19): An ICD-11 based screening measure across three languages. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 9(2), 247258. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.2020.00034.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bőthe, B., Tóth-Király, I., Potenza, M. N., Orosz, G., & Demetrovics, Z. (2020). High-frequency pornography use may not always be problematic. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 17(4), 793811. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2020.01.007.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Briken, P., Wiessner, C., Štulhofer, A., Klein, V., Fuß, J., Reed, G. M., & Dekker, A. (2022). Who feels affected by “out of control” sexual behavior? Prevalence and correlates of indicators for ICD-11 compulsive sexual behavior disorder in the German health and sexuality Survey (GeSiD). Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 11(3), 900911. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.2022.00060.

    • Search Google Scholar
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dhuffar, M. K., & Griffiths, M. D. (2016). Barriers to female sex addiction treatment in the UK. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 5, 562567. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.5.2016.072.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kaplan, M. S., & Krueger, R. B. (2010). Diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of hypersexuality. The Journal of Sex Research, 47(2), 181198 2010 https://doi.org/10.1080/00224491003592863.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Klucken, T., Wehrum-Osinsky, S., Schweckendiek, J., Schweckendiek, J., Kruse, O., & Stark, R. (2016). Altered appetitive conditioning and neural connectivity in subjects with compulsive sexual behavior. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 13(4), 627636. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2016.01.013.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kowalewska, E. (2023). Compulsive sexual behavior and its correlates in a sample of Polish treatment-seeking women. In F. Prever, G. Blycker, & L. Brandt (Eds.), Behavioural addiction in women: An international female perspective on treatment and research (pp. 249259). London, UK: Taylor and Francis Group.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kowalewska, E., Gola, M., Kraus, S. W., & Lew-Starowicz, M. (2020). Spotlight on compulsive sexual behavior disorder: A systematic review of research on women. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 16, 20252043. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S221540.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kowalewska, E., Gola, M., Lew-Starowicz, M., & Kraus, S. W. (2022). Predictors of compulsive sexual behavior among treatment-seeking women. Sexual Medicine, 10(4), 100525. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esxm.2022.100525.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kraus, S. W., Potenza, M. N., Martino, S., & Grant, J. E. (2015). Examining the psychometric properties of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale in a sample of compulsive pornography users. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 59, 117122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2015.02.007.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McKeague, E. L. (2014). Differentiating the female sex addict: A literature review focused on themes of gender difference used to inform recommendations for treating women with sex addiction. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 21(3), 203224. https://doi.org/10.1080/10720162.2014.931266.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Reid, R. C., Carpenter, B. N., Hook, J. N., Garos, S., Manning, J. C., Gilliland, R., … Fong, T. (2012). Report of findings in a DSM-5 field trial for hypersexual disorder. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 9(11), 28682877. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2012.02936.x.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Reid, R. C., Dhuffar, M. K., Parhami, I., & Fong, T. W. (2012). Exploring facets of personality in a patient sample of hypersexual women compared with hypersexual men. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 18(4), 262268. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.pra.0000416016.37968.eb.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Voon, V., Mole, T. B., Banca, P., Porter, L., Morris, L., Mitchell, S., … Irvine, M. (2014). Neural correlates of sexual cue reactivity in individuals with and without compulsive sexual behaviours. Plos One, 9(7), e102419. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102419.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Health Organization (2022). International statistical classification of diseases and related health problems (11th ed.). Retrieved from https://icd.who.int/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ballester-Arnal, R., Castro-Calvo, J., Gil-Llario, M. D., & Gil-Julia, B. (2017). Cybersex addiction: A study on Spanish college students. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 43(6), 567585. https://doi.org/10.1080/0092623X.2016.1208700.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bostrom, A. E., Chatzittofis, A., Ciuculete, D. M., Flanagan, J., Krattinger, R., Bandstein, M., … Jokinen, J. (2019). Hyper- methylation-associated downregulation of microRNA-4456 in hypersexual disorder with putative influence on oxytocin sig- nalling: A DNA methylation analysis of miRNA genes. Epigenetics, 15(1–2), 145160. https://doi.org/10.1080/15592294.2019.1656157.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bőthe, B., Koós, M., Nagy, L., Kraus, S. W., Demetrovics, Z., Potenza, M., … Vaillancourt-Morel, M. (2023). Compulsive sexual behavior disorder in 42 countries: Insights from the International Sex Survey and introduction of standardized assessment tools. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 12(2), 393407. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.2023.00028.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bőthe, B., Potenza, M. N., Griffiths, M. D., Kraus, S. W., Klein, V., Fuss, J., & Demetrovics, Z. (2020). The development of the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder Scale (CSBD-19): An ICD-11 based screening measure across three languages. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 9(2), 247258. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.2020.00034.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bőthe, B., Tóth-Király, I., Potenza, M. N., Orosz, G., & Demetrovics, Z. (2020). High-frequency pornography use may not always be problematic. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 17(4), 793811. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2020.01.007.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Briken, P., Wiessner, C., Štulhofer, A., Klein, V., Fuß, J., Reed, G. M., & Dekker, A. (2022). Who feels affected by “out of control” sexual behavior? Prevalence and correlates of indicators for ICD-11 compulsive sexual behavior disorder in the German health and sexuality Survey (GeSiD). Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 11(3), 900911. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.2022.00060.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chatzittofis, A., Arver, S., Oberg, K., Hallberg, J., Nordström, P., & Jokinen, J. (2016). HPA axis dysregulation in men with hypersexual disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 63, 247253. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.10.002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dhuffar, M. K., & Griffiths, M. D. (2016). Barriers to female sex addiction treatment in the UK. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 5, 562567. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.5.2016.072.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gola, M., Kowalewska, E., Wordecha, M., Lew-Starowicz, M., Kraus, S., & Potenza, M. (2018, April). Findings from the Polish compulsive sexual behavior disorder field trial. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 7, 7273.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gola, M., Wordecha, M., Sescousse, G., Lew-Starowicz, M., Kossowski, B., Wypych, M., … Marchewka, A. (2017). Can pornography be addictive? An fMRI study of men seeking treatment for problematic pornography use. Neuropsychopharmacology, 42(10), 20212031. https://doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.78.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Grubbs, J. B., Hoagland, K. C., Lee, B. N., Grant, J. T., Davison, P., Reid, R. C., & Kraus, S. W. (2020). Sexual addiction 25 years on: A systematic and methodological review of empirical literature and an agenda for future research. Clinical Psychology Review, 82, 101925. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2020.101925.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jokinen, J., Bostrom, A. E., Chatzittofis, A., Ciuculete, D. M., Öberg, G., Flanagan, J. N., … Schiöth, H. B. (2017). Methylation of HPA axis related genes in men with hypersexual disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 80, 6773. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.03.007.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kürbitz, L. I., & Briken, P. (2021). Is compulsive sexual behavior different in women compared to men? Journal of Clinical Medicine, 10(15), 3205. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10153205.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kafka, M. P. (2010). Hypersexual disorder: A proposed diagnosis for DSM-V. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 39(2), 377400. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-009-9574-7.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kaplan, M. S., & Krueger, R. B. (2010). Diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of hypersexuality. The Journal of Sex Research, 47(2), 181198 2010 https://doi.org/10.1080/00224491003592863.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Klucken, T., Wehrum-Osinsky, S., Schweckendiek, J., Schweckendiek, J., Kruse, O., & Stark, R. (2016). Altered appetitive conditioning and neural connectivity in subjects with compulsive sexual behavior. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 13(4), 627636. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2016.01.013.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kowalewska, E. (2023). Compulsive sexual behavior and its correlates in a sample of Polish treatment-seeking women. In F. Prever, G. Blycker, & L. Brandt (Eds.), Behavioural addiction in women: An international female perspective on treatment and research (pp. 249259). London, UK: Taylor and Francis Group.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kowalewska, E., Gola, M., Kraus, S. W., & Lew-Starowicz, M. (2020). Spotlight on compulsive sexual behavior disorder: A systematic review of research on women. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 16, 20252043. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S221540.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kowalewska, E., Gola, M., Lew-Starowicz, M., & Kraus, S. W. (2022). Predictors of compulsive sexual behavior among treatment-seeking women. Sexual Medicine, 10(4), 100525. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.esxm.2022.100525.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kraus, S. W., Potenza, M. N., Martino, S., & Grant, J. E. (2015). Examining the psychometric properties of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale in a sample of compulsive pornography users. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 59, 117122. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2015.02.007.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McKeague, E. L. (2014). Differentiating the female sex addict: A literature review focused on themes of gender difference used to inform recommendations for treating women with sex addiction. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 21(3), 203224. https://doi.org/10.1080/10720162.2014.931266.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Reid, R. C., Carpenter, B. N., Hook, J. N., Garos, S., Manning, J. C., Gilliland, R., … Fong, T. (2012). Report of findings in a DSM-5 field trial for hypersexual disorder. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 9(11), 28682877. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2012.02936.x.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Reid, R. C., Dhuffar, M. K., Parhami, I., & Fong, T. W. (2012). Exploring facets of personality in a patient sample of hypersexual women compared with hypersexual men. Journal of Psychiatric Practice, 18(4), 262268. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.pra.0000416016.37968.eb.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Voon, V., Mole, T. B., Banca, P., Porter, L., Morris, L., Mitchell, S., … Irvine, M. (2014). Neural correlates of sexual cue reactivity in individuals with and without compulsive sexual behaviours. Plos One, 9(7), e102419. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102419.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Health Organization (2022). International statistical classification of diseases and related health problems (11th ed.). Retrieved from https://icd.who.int/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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Dr. Zsolt Demetrovics
Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University
Address: Izabella u. 46. H-1064 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: +36-1-461-2681
E-mail: jba@ppk.elte.hu

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  • CABELLS Journalytics

2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
5713
Journal Impact Factor 7.8
Rank by Impact Factor

Psychiatry (SCIE) 18/155
Psychiatry (SSCI) 13/144

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
7.2
5 Year
Impact Factor
8.9
Journal Citation Indicator 1.42
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Psychiatry 35/264

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
69
Scimago
Journal Rank
1.918
Scimago Quartile Score Clinical Psychology Q1
Medicine (miscellaneous) Q1
Psychiatry and Mental Health Q1
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
11.1
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Clinical Psychology 10/292 (96th PCTL)
Psychiatry and Mental Health 30/531 (94th PCTL)
Medicine (miscellaneous) 25/309 (92th PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
1.966

 

 
2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
5223
Journal Impact Factor 7,772
Rank by Impact Factor Psychiatry SCIE 26/155
Psychiatry SSCI 19/142
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
7,130
5 Year
Impact Factor
9,026
Journal Citation Indicator 1,39
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Psychiatry 34/257

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
56
Scimago
Journal Rank
1,951
Scimago Quartile Score Clinical Psychology (Q1)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q1)
Psychiatry and Mental Health (Q1)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
11,5
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Clinical Psychology 5/292 (D1)
Psychiatry and Mental Health 20/529 (D1)
Medicine (miscellaneous) 17/276 (D1)
Scopus
SNIP
2,184

2020  
Total Cites 4024
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
6,756
Rank by Psychiatry (SSCI) 12/143 (Q1)
Impact Factor Psychiatry 19/156 (Q1)
Impact Factor 6,052
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 8,735
Impact Factor
Journal  1,48
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Psychiatry 24/250 (Q1)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 86
Items
Total 74
Articles
Total 12
Reviews
Scimago 47
H-index
Scimago 2,265
Journal Rank
Scimago Clinical Psychology Q1
Quartile Score Psychiatry and Mental Health Q1
  Medicine (miscellaneous) Q1
Scopus 3593/367=9,8
Scite Score  
Scopus Clinical Psychology 7/283 (Q1)
Scite Score Rank Psychiatry and Mental Health 22/502 (Q1)
Scopus 2,026
SNIP  
Days from  38
submission  
to 1st decision  
Days from  37
acceptance  
to publication  
Acceptance 31%
Rate  

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
2 184
Impact Factor 5,143
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
4,346
5 Year
Impact Factor
5,758
Immediacy
Index
0,587
Citable
Items
75
Total
Articles
67
Total
Reviews
8
Cited
Half-Life
3,3
Citing
Half-Life
6,8
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00597
Article Influence
Score
1,447
% Articles
in
Citable Items
89,33
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,7294
Average
IF
Percentile
87,923
Scimago
H-index
37
Scimago
Journal Rank
1,767
Scopus
Scite Score
2540/376=6,8
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Cllinical Psychology 16/275 (Q1)
Medicine (miscellenous) 31/219 (Q1)
Psychiatry and Mental Health 47/506 (Q1)
Scopus
SNIP
1,441
Acceptance
Rate
32%

 

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Publication Model Gold Open Access
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 990 EUR/article for articles submitted after 30 April 2023 (850 EUR for articles submitted prior to this date)
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%.
Subscription Information Gold Open Access

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2011
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem
Founder's
Address
H-1053 Budapest, Hungary Egyetem tér 1-3.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2062-5871 (Print)
ISSN 2063-5303 (Online)

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Zsolt DEMETROVICS

Assistant Editor(s): Csilla ÁGOSTON

Associate Editors

  • Stephanie ANTONS (Universitat Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
  • Joel BILLIEUX (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Beáta BŐTHE (University of Montreal, Canada)
  • Matthias BRAND (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
  • Ruth J. van HOLST (Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel KING (Flinders University, Australia)
  • Gyöngyi KÖKÖNYEI (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Ludwig KRAUS (IFT Institute for Therapy Research, Germany)
  • Marc N. POTENZA (Yale University, USA)
  • Hans-Jurgen RUMPF (University of Lübeck, Germany)

Editorial Board

  • Sophia ACHAB (Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland)
  • Alex BALDACCHINO (St Andrews University, United Kingdom)
  • Judit BALÁZS (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Maria BELLRINGER (Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand)
  • Henrietta BOWDEN-JONES (Imperial College, United Kingdom)
  • Damien BREVERS (University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg)
  • Wim VAN DEN BRINK (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Julius BURKAUSKAS (Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Lithuania)
  • Gerhard BÜHRINGER (Technische Universität Dresden, Germany)
  • Silvia CASALE (University of Florence, Florence, Italy)
  • Luke CLARK (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada)
  • Jeffrey L. DEREVENSKY (McGill University, Canada)
  • Geert DOM (University of Antwerp, Belgium)
  • Nicki DOWLING (Deakin University, Geelong, Australia)
  • Hamed EKHTIARI (University of Minnesota, United States)
  • Jon ELHAI (University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA)
  • Ana ESTEVEZ (University of Deusto, Spain)
  • Fernando FERNANDEZ-ARANDA (Bellvitge University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain)
  • Naomi FINEBERG (University of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom)
  • Sally GAINSBURY (The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia)
  • Belle GAVRIEL-FRIED (The Bob Shapell School of Social Work, Tel Aviv University, Israel)
  • Biljana GJONESKA (Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Republic of North Macedonia)
  • Marie GRALL-BRONNEC (University Hospital of Nantes, France)
  • Jon E. GRANT (University of Minnesota, USA)
  • Mark GRIFFITHS (Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom)
  • Joshua GRUBBS (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA)
  • Anneke GOUDRIAAN (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Susumu HIGUCHI (National Hospital Organization Kurihama Medical and Addiction Center, Japan)
  • David HODGINS (University of Calgary, Canada)
  • Eric HOLLANDER (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA)
  • Zsolt HORVÁTH (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Susana JIMÉNEZ-MURCIA (Clinical Psychology Unit, Bellvitge University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain)
  • Yasser KHAZAAL (Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland)
  • Orsolya KIRÁLY (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Chih-Hung KO (Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan)
  • Shane KRAUS (University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA)
  • Hae Kook LEE (The Catholic University of Korea, Republic of Korea)
  • Bernadette KUN (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Katerina LUKAVSKA (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • Giovanni MARTINOTTI (‘Gabriele d’Annunzio’ University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy)
  • Gemma MESTRE-BACH (Universidad Internacional de la Rioja, La Rioja, Spain)
  • Astrid MÜLLER (Hannover Medical School, Germany)
  • Daniel Thor OLASON (University of Iceland, Iceland)
  • Ståle PALLESEN (University of Bergen, Norway)
  • Afarin RAHIMI-MOVAGHAR (Teheran University of Medical Sciences, Iran)
  • József RÁCZ (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary)
  • Michael SCHAUB (University of Zurich, Switzerland)
  • Marcantanio M. SPADA (London South Bank University, United Kingdom)
  • Daniel SPRITZER (Study Group on Technological Addictions, Brazil)
  • Dan J. STEIN (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
  • Sherry H. STEWART (Dalhousie University, Canada)
  • Attila SZABÓ (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Hermano TAVARES (Instituto de Psiquiatria do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil)
  • Alexander E. VOISKOUNSKY (Moscow State University, Russia)
  • Aviv M. WEINSTEIN (Ariel University, Israel)
  • Anise WU (University of Macau, Macao, China)

 

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