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Giacomo Grassi Department of NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

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Martjin Figee Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

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Paolo Stratta Department of Mental Health, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy

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Alessandro Rossi Department of Mental Health, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy

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Stefano Pallanti Department of NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy

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In our recently published article, we investigated the behavioral addiction model of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), by assessing three core dimensions of addiction in patients with OCD healthy participants. Similar to the common findings in addiction, OCD patients demonstrated increased impulsivity, risky decision-making, and biased probabilistic reasoning compared to healthy controls. Thus, we concluded that these results support the conceptualization of OCD as a disorder of behavioral addiction. Here, we answer to Abramovitch and McKay (2016) commentary on our paper and we support our conclusions by explaining how cognitive impulsivity is also a typical feature of addiction and how our results on decision-making and probabilistic reasoning tasks reflect cognitive impulsivity facets that are consistently replicated in OCD and addiction.

Abstract

In our recently published article, we investigated the behavioral addiction model of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), by assessing three core dimensions of addiction in patients with OCD healthy participants. Similar to the common findings in addiction, OCD patients demonstrated increased impulsivity, risky decision-making, and biased probabilistic reasoning compared to healthy controls. Thus, we concluded that these results support the conceptualization of OCD as a disorder of behavioral addiction. Here, we answer to Abramovitch and McKay (2016) commentary on our paper and we support our conclusions by explaining how cognitive impulsivity is also a typical feature of addiction and how our results on decision-making and probabilistic reasoning tasks reflect cognitive impulsivity facets that are consistently replicated in OCD and addiction.

In our recently published article, we investigated the behavioral addiction model of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), by assessing three core dimensions of addiction in 38 patients with OCD and 39 healthy participants (Grassi et al., 2015). Similar to the common findings in addiction, OCD patients demonstrated increased impulsivity, risky decision-making, and biased probabilistic reasoning compared to healthy controls. Thus, we concluded that these results support the conceptualization of OCD as a disorder of behavioral addiction.

Abramovitch and McKay (2016) argued that this conclusion is untenable by suggesting that (a) our finding of increased cognitive impulsivity and non-planning impulsivity on the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11) in OCD patients may support cognitive impulsivity, but not behavioral impulsivity that is typical for addiction and (b) risky decision-making on the Iowa gambling task (IGT) and fewer draws to decision on the Beads Task in our OCD patients may be accounted for by doubting and risk avoidance, rather than the typical risk-taking behaviors of addiction.

Here, we support our conclusions by explaining how cognitive impulsivity is also a typical feature of addiction and how our results on decision-making and probabilistic reasoning tasks reflect cognitive impulsivity facets that are consistently replicated in OCD and addiction.

First, our OCD patients indeed had significantly increased impulsivity scores on the cognitive (attentional and non-planning) subscales of the BIS-11, but not on the subscale for motor impulsivity. This finding is consistent with other studies that showed predominantly increased cognitive impulsivity in OCD patients (Benatti, Dell’osso, Arici, Hollander, & Altamura, 2014; Ettelt et al., 2007; Sohn, Kang, Namkoong, & Kim, 2014). Moreover, our two other results, risky decision-making on the IGT and fewer draws to decision on the Beads Task might also reflect impulsivity predominantly on a cognitive reflective level (Voon et al., 2015). These results do not seem to contradict our behavioral addiction model. In fact, increased cognitive impulsivity on the cognitive subscales of the BIS-11 is a well-replicated finding in substance and behavioral addictions, such as gambling disorder and internet addiction (Choi et al., 2014; Marazziti et al., 2014; Zhou, Zhou, & Zhu, 2016). Moreover, previous studies showed similar results of increased reflection impulsivity using the same (Beads) task in a range of addiction-related disorders, such as substance use disorders, gambling disorder, binge drinking, and Parkinson’s disease with medication-induced behavioral addictions (Banca et al., 2016; Djamshidian et al., 2012, 2013).

Second, Abramovitch and McKay (2016) argued that higher scores on the BIS-11 cognitive subscales in our OCD group could be simply explained by excessive doubting, and therefore contradict the behavioral addiction model of OCD. However, we also found increased cognitive impulsivity on the Beads Task, which could not be explained by excessive doubting as patients accumulated significantly fewer evidence prior to decision than controls, reflecting overconfidence rather than excessive doubting. In addition, our patients demonstrated impaired decision-making performances on the IGT under ambiguous conditions, which did not improve during the task and therefore suggests a preference toward immediate reward despite negative future consequences rather than excessive doubting and risk avoidance. Moreover, impaired decision-making is a well-replicated result in OCD samples (Cavedini, Gorni, & Bellodi, 2006; Cavedini, Riboldi, D’Annucci, & Bellodi, 2002) and is also present in unaffected OCD relatives (Cavedini, Zorzi, Piccinni, Cavallini, & Bellodi, 2010) who do not suffer from obsessive–compulsive symptoms, discarding the suggestion that these impairments are better explained by difficulties in planning due to obsessions. Our results of a preference toward immediate reward despite negative future consequences are in line with a recent study that found increased delay discounting rates in OCD patients (Sohn et al., 2014), which is a common finding also in addiction.

Nevertheless, the absence of prominent motor impulsivity in our OCD sample might also be explained by the limits of the BIS-11 in capturing the clinical expressions of motor impulsivity, rather than to the absence of behavioral impulsivity in OCD per se. In fact, the previous studies consistently showed deficits in motor response inhibition on the stop-signal tasks, which is a reliable proxy for behavioral impulsivity (Chamberlain, Fineberg, Blackwell, Robbins, & Sahakian, 2006; Chamberlain et al., 2007). Moreover, these results have been replicated in OCD siblings suggesting that motor impulsivity could represent an endophenotype of OCD (Chamberlain et al., 2007; de Wit et al., 2012). Finally, OCD patients performing the stop-signal task demonstrated abnormal activation of inferior frontal gyrus and supplementary motor area (de Wit et al., 2012), which is also found in substance and behavioral addictions, suggesting a common neural substrate of motor impulsivity in OCD and addiction (de Ruiter, Oosterlaan, Veltman, van den Brink, & Goudriaan, 2012; Schmaal et al., 2013).

In conclusion, our study supports the presence of cognitive impulsivity in OCD patients as has also been observed in addictive disorders, and therefore supports the behavioral addiction model of OCD. Further longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate if these dysfunctions have a causal role in the development of OCD, as it is supposed for addictive behaviors, or if they are consequences of a broader fronto-striatal network dysfunction.

Authors’ contribution

GG and MF drafted and revised the paper. SP, PS, and AR revised the paper.

Conflict of interest

None.

References

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    • Export Citation
  • Banca, P. , Lange, I. , Worbe, Y. , Howell, N. A. , Irvine, M. , Harrison, N. A. , Moutoussis, M. , & Voon, V. (2016). Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: Behavioural and volumetric correlates. Addiction Biology, 21(2), 504515. doi:10.1111/adb.12227

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Benatti, B. , Dell’osso, B. , Arici, C. , Hollander, E. , & Altamura, A. C. (2014). Characterizing impulsivity profile in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, 18(3), 156160. doi:10.3109/13651501.2013.855792

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavedini, P. , Gorni, A. , & Bellodi, L. (2006). Understanding obsessive-compulsive disorder: Focus on decision making. Neuropsychological Reviews, 16, 314. doi:10.1007/s11065-006-9001-y

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavedini, P. , Riboldi, G. , D’Annucci, A. , & Bellodi, L. (2002). Decision-making heterogeneity in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Ventromedial prefrontal cortex function predicts different treatment outcomes. Neuropsychologia, 40(2), 205211.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavedini, P. , Zorzi, C. , Piccinni, M. , Cavallini, M. C. , & Bellodi, L. (2010). Executive dysfunctions in obsessive-compulsive patients and unaffected relatives: Searching for a new intermediate phenotype. Biological Psychiatry, 67(12), 11781184. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.02.012

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chamberlain, S. R. , Fineberg, N. A. , Blackwell, A. D. , Robbins, T. W. , & Sahakian, B. J. (2006). Motor inhibition and cognitive flexibility in obsessive-compulsive disorder and trichotillomania. American Journal of Psychiatry, 163(7), 12821284. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.163.7.1282

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  • Chamberlain, S. R. , Fineberg, N. A. , Menzies, L. A. , Blackwell, A. D. , Bullmore, E. T. , Robbins, T. W. , & Sahakian, B. J. (2007). Impaired cognitive flexibility and motor inhibition in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(2), 335338. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.164.2.335

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  • Choi, S. W. , Kim, H. S. , Kim, G. Y. , Jeon, Y. , Park, S. M. , Lee, J. Y. , Jung, H. Y. , Sohn, B. K. , Choi, J. S. , & Kim, D. J. (2014). Similarities and differences among Internet gaming disorder, gambling disorder and alcohol use disorder: A focus on impulsivity and compulsivity. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 3(4), 246253. doi:10.1556/JBA.3.2014.4.6

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Ruiter, M. B. , Oosterlaan, J. , Veltman, D. J. , van den Brink, W. , & Goudriaan, A. E. (2012). Similar hyporesponsiveness of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex in problem gamblers and heavy smokers during an inhibitory control task. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 121(1–2), 8189. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.08.010

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Wit, S. J. , de Vries, F. E. , van der Werf, Y. D. , Cath, D. C. , Heslenfeld, D. J. , Veltman, E. M. , van Balkom, A. J. , Veltman, D. J. , & van den Heuvel, O. A. (2012). Presupplementary motor area hyperactivity during response inhibition: A candidate endophenotype of obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(10), 11001108. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.12010073

    • Search Google Scholar
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  • Djamshidian, A. , O’Sullivan, S. S. , Foltynie, T. , Aviles-Olmos, I. , Limousin, P. , Noyce, A. , Zrinzo, L. , Lees, A. J. , Averbeck, B. B. (2013). Dopamine agonists rather than deep brain stimulation cause reflection impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease. Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, 3(2), 139144. doi:10.3233/JPD-130178.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Djamshidian, A. , O’Sullivan, S. S. , Sanotsky, Y. , Sharman, S. , Matviyenko, Y. , Foltynie, T. , Michalczuk, R. , Aviles-Olmos, I. , Fedoryshyn, L. , Doherty, K. M. , Filts, Y. , Selikhova, M. , Bowden-Jones, H. , Joyce, E. , Lees, A. J. , & Averbeck, B. B. (2012). Decision making, impulsivity, and addictions: Do Parkinson’s disease patients jump to conclusions? Movement Disorders, 27(9), 11371145. doi:10.1002/mds.25105

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    • Export Citation
  • Ettelt, S. , Ruhrmann, S. , Barnow, S. , Buthz, F. , Hochrein, A. , Meyer, K. , Kraft, S. , Reck, C. , Pukrop, R. , Klosterkötter, J. , Falkai, P. , Maier, W. , Wagner, M. , Freyberger, H. J. , & Grabe, H. J. (2007). Impulsiveness in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Results from a family study. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 115(1), 4147. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0447.2006.00835.x

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Grassi, G. , Pallanti, S. , Righi, L. , Figee, M. , Mantione, M. , Denys, D. , Piccagliani, D. , Rossi, A. , & Stratta, P. (2015). Think twice: Impulsivity and decision making in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 4(4), 263272. doi:10.1556/2006.4.2015.039

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Marazziti, D. , Picchetti, M. , Baroni, S. , Consoli, G. , Ceresoli, D. , Massimetti, G. , & Catena Dell’Osso, M. (2014). Pathological gambling and impulsivity: An Italian study. Rivista di Psichiatria, 49(2), 9599. doi:10.1708/1461.16149

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schmaal, L. , Joos, L. , Koeleman, M. , Veltman, D. J. , van den Brink, W. , & Goudriaan, A. E. (2013). Effects of modafinil on neural correlates of response inhibition in alcohol-dependent patients. Biological Psychiatry, 73(3), 211218. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.06.032

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sohn, S. Y. , Kang, J. I. , Namkoong, K. , & Kim, S. J. (2014). Multidimensional measures of impulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Cannot wait and stop. PLoS One, 9(11), e111739. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0111739

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    • Export Citation
  • Voon, V. , Chang-Webb, Y. C. , Morris, L. S. , Cooper, E. , Sethi, A. , Baek, K. , Grant, J. , Robbins, T. W. , & Harrison, N. A. (2015). Waiting impulsivity: The influence of acute methylphenidate and feedback. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 19(1). doi:10.1093/ijnp/pyv074

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zhou, Z. , Zhou, H. , & Zhu, H. (2016). Working memory, executive function and impulsivity in Internet-addictive disorders: A comparison with pathological gambling. Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 28(2), 92100. doi:10.1017/neu.2015.54

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Abramovitch, A. , & McKay, D. (2016). Behavioral impulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 9, 13. doi:10.1556/2006.5.2016.029

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Banca, P. , Lange, I. , Worbe, Y. , Howell, N. A. , Irvine, M. , Harrison, N. A. , Moutoussis, M. , & Voon, V. (2016). Reflection impulsivity in binge drinking: Behavioural and volumetric correlates. Addiction Biology, 21(2), 504515. doi:10.1111/adb.12227

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Benatti, B. , Dell’osso, B. , Arici, C. , Hollander, E. , & Altamura, A. C. (2014). Characterizing impulsivity profile in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, 18(3), 156160. doi:10.3109/13651501.2013.855792

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavedini, P. , Gorni, A. , & Bellodi, L. (2006). Understanding obsessive-compulsive disorder: Focus on decision making. Neuropsychological Reviews, 16, 314. doi:10.1007/s11065-006-9001-y

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavedini, P. , Riboldi, G. , D’Annucci, A. , & Bellodi, L. (2002). Decision-making heterogeneity in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Ventromedial prefrontal cortex function predicts different treatment outcomes. Neuropsychologia, 40(2), 205211.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavedini, P. , Zorzi, C. , Piccinni, M. , Cavallini, M. C. , & Bellodi, L. (2010). Executive dysfunctions in obsessive-compulsive patients and unaffected relatives: Searching for a new intermediate phenotype. Biological Psychiatry, 67(12), 11781184. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.02.012

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chamberlain, S. R. , Fineberg, N. A. , Blackwell, A. D. , Robbins, T. W. , & Sahakian, B. J. (2006). Motor inhibition and cognitive flexibility in obsessive-compulsive disorder and trichotillomania. American Journal of Psychiatry, 163(7), 12821284. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.163.7.1282

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chamberlain, S. R. , Fineberg, N. A. , Menzies, L. A. , Blackwell, A. D. , Bullmore, E. T. , Robbins, T. W. , & Sahakian, B. J. (2007). Impaired cognitive flexibility and motor inhibition in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(2), 335338. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.164.2.335

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Choi, S. W. , Kim, H. S. , Kim, G. Y. , Jeon, Y. , Park, S. M. , Lee, J. Y. , Jung, H. Y. , Sohn, B. K. , Choi, J. S. , & Kim, D. J. (2014). Similarities and differences among Internet gaming disorder, gambling disorder and alcohol use disorder: A focus on impulsivity and compulsivity. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 3(4), 246253. doi:10.1556/JBA.3.2014.4.6

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Ruiter, M. B. , Oosterlaan, J. , Veltman, D. J. , van den Brink, W. , & Goudriaan, A. E. (2012). Similar hyporesponsiveness of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex in problem gamblers and heavy smokers during an inhibitory control task. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 121(1–2), 8189. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2011.08.010

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Wit, S. J. , de Vries, F. E. , van der Werf, Y. D. , Cath, D. C. , Heslenfeld, D. J. , Veltman, E. M. , van Balkom, A. J. , Veltman, D. J. , & van den Heuvel, O. A. (2012). Presupplementary motor area hyperactivity during response inhibition: A candidate endophenotype of obsessive-compulsive disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(10), 11001108. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.12010073

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Djamshidian, A. , O’Sullivan, S. S. , Foltynie, T. , Aviles-Olmos, I. , Limousin, P. , Noyce, A. , Zrinzo, L. , Lees, A. J. , Averbeck, B. B. (2013). Dopamine agonists rather than deep brain stimulation cause reflection impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease. Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, 3(2), 139144. doi:10.3233/JPD-130178.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Djamshidian, A. , O’Sullivan, S. S. , Sanotsky, Y. , Sharman, S. , Matviyenko, Y. , Foltynie, T. , Michalczuk, R. , Aviles-Olmos, I. , Fedoryshyn, L. , Doherty, K. M. , Filts, Y. , Selikhova, M. , Bowden-Jones, H. , Joyce, E. , Lees, A. J. , & Averbeck, B. B. (2012). Decision making, impulsivity, and addictions: Do Parkinson’s disease patients jump to conclusions? Movement Disorders, 27(9), 11371145. doi:10.1002/mds.25105

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ettelt, S. , Ruhrmann, S. , Barnow, S. , Buthz, F. , Hochrein, A. , Meyer, K. , Kraft, S. , Reck, C. , Pukrop, R. , Klosterkötter, J. , Falkai, P. , Maier, W. , Wagner, M. , Freyberger, H. J. , & Grabe, H. J. (2007). Impulsiveness in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Results from a family study. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 115(1), 4147. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0447.2006.00835.x

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Grassi, G. , Pallanti, S. , Righi, L. , Figee, M. , Mantione, M. , Denys, D. , Piccagliani, D. , Rossi, A. , & Stratta, P. (2015). Think twice: Impulsivity and decision making in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 4(4), 263272. doi:10.1556/2006.4.2015.039

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Marazziti, D. , Picchetti, M. , Baroni, S. , Consoli, G. , Ceresoli, D. , Massimetti, G. , & Catena Dell’Osso, M. (2014). Pathological gambling and impulsivity: An Italian study. Rivista di Psichiatria, 49(2), 9599. doi:10.1708/1461.16149

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schmaal, L. , Joos, L. , Koeleman, M. , Veltman, D. J. , van den Brink, W. , & Goudriaan, A. E. (2013). Effects of modafinil on neural correlates of response inhibition in alcohol-dependent patients. Biological Psychiatry, 73(3), 211218. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.06.032

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sohn, S. Y. , Kang, J. I. , Namkoong, K. , & Kim, S. J. (2014). Multidimensional measures of impulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Cannot wait and stop. PLoS One, 9(11), e111739. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0111739

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Voon, V. , Chang-Webb, Y. C. , Morris, L. S. , Cooper, E. , Sethi, A. , Baek, K. , Grant, J. , Robbins, T. W. , & Harrison, N. A. (2015). Waiting impulsivity: The influence of acute methylphenidate and feedback. International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, 19(1). doi:10.1093/ijnp/pyv074

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zhou, Z. , Zhou, H. , & Zhu, H. (2016). Working memory, executive function and impulsivity in Internet-addictive disorders: A comparison with pathological gambling. Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 28(2), 92100. doi:10.1017/neu.2015.54

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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Dr. Zsolt Demetrovics
Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University
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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
5713
Journal Impact Factor 7.8
Rank by Impact Factor

Psychiatry (SCIE) 18/155
Psychiatry (SSCI) 13/144

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
7.2
5 Year
Impact Factor
8.9
Journal Citation Indicator 1.42
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Psychiatry 35/264

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
69
Scimago
Journal Rank
1.918
Scimago Quartile Score Clinical Psychology Q1
Medicine (miscellaneous) Q1
Psychiatry and Mental Health Q1
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
11.1
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Clinical Psychology 10/292 (96th PCTL)
Psychiatry and Mental Health 30/531 (94th PCTL)
Medicine (miscellaneous) 25/309 (92th PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
1.966

 

 
2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
5223
Journal Impact Factor 7,772
Rank by Impact Factor Psychiatry SCIE 26/155
Psychiatry SSCI 19/142
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
7,130
5 Year
Impact Factor
9,026
Journal Citation Indicator 1,39
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Psychiatry 34/257

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
56
Scimago
Journal Rank
1,951
Scimago Quartile Score Clinical Psychology (Q1)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q1)
Psychiatry and Mental Health (Q1)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
11,5
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Clinical Psychology 5/292 (D1)
Psychiatry and Mental Health 20/529 (D1)
Medicine (miscellaneous) 17/276 (D1)
Scopus
SNIP
2,184

2020  
Total Cites 4024
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
6,756
Rank by Psychiatry (SSCI) 12/143 (Q1)
Impact Factor Psychiatry 19/156 (Q1)
Impact Factor 6,052
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 8,735
Impact Factor
Journal  1,48
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Psychiatry 24/250 (Q1)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 86
Items
Total 74
Articles
Total 12
Reviews
Scimago 47
H-index
Scimago 2,265
Journal Rank
Scimago Clinical Psychology Q1
Quartile Score Psychiatry and Mental Health Q1
  Medicine (miscellaneous) Q1
Scopus 3593/367=9,8
Scite Score  
Scopus Clinical Psychology 7/283 (Q1)
Scite Score Rank Psychiatry and Mental Health 22/502 (Q1)
Scopus 2,026
SNIP  
Days from  38
submission  
to 1st decision  
Days from  37
acceptance  
to publication  
Acceptance 31%
Rate  

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
2 184
Impact Factor 5,143
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
4,346
5 Year
Impact Factor
5,758
Immediacy
Index
0,587
Citable
Items
75
Total
Articles
67
Total
Reviews
8
Cited
Half-Life
3,3
Citing
Half-Life
6,8
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00597
Article Influence
Score
1,447
% Articles
in
Citable Items
89,33
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,7294
Average
IF
Percentile
87,923
Scimago
H-index
37
Scimago
Journal Rank
1,767
Scopus
Scite Score
2540/376=6,8
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Cllinical Psychology 16/275 (Q1)
Medicine (miscellenous) 31/219 (Q1)
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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Publication Model Gold Open Access
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 990 EUR/article for articles submitted after 30 April 2023 (850 EUR for articles submitted prior to this date)
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%.
Subscription Information Gold Open Access

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2011
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem
Founder's
Address
H-1053 Budapest, Hungary Egyetem tér 1-3.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2062-5871 (Print)
ISSN 2063-5303 (Online)

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Zsolt DEMETROVICS

Assistant Editor(s): Csilla ÁGOSTON

Associate Editors

  • Stephanie ANTONS (Universitat Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
  • Joel BILLIEUX (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Beáta BŐTHE (University of Montreal, Canada)
  • Matthias BRAND (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
  • Ruth J. van HOLST (Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel KING (Flinders University, Australia)
  • Gyöngyi KÖKÖNYEI (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Ludwig KRAUS (IFT Institute for Therapy Research, Germany)
  • Marc N. POTENZA (Yale University, USA)
  • Hans-Jurgen RUMPF (University of Lübeck, Germany)

Editorial Board

  • Max W. ABBOTT (Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand)
  • Elias N. ABOUJAOUDE (Stanford University School of Medicine, USA)
  • Hojjat ADELI (Ohio State University, USA)
  • Alex BALDACCHINO (University of Dundee, United Kingdom)
  • Alex BLASZCZYNSKI (University of Sidney, Australia)
  • Judit BALÁZS (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Kenneth BLUM (University of Florida, USA)
  • Henrietta BOWDEN-JONES (Imperial College, United Kingdom)
  • Wim VAN DEN BRINK (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Gerhard BÜHRINGER (Technische Universität Dresden, Germany)
  • Sam-Wook CHOI (Eulji University, Republic of Korea)
  • Damiaan DENYS (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Jeffrey L. DEREVENSKY (McGill University, Canada)
  • Naomi FINEBERG (University of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom)
  • Marie GRALL-BRONNEC (University Hospital of Nantes, France)
  • Jon E. GRANT (University of Minnesota, USA)
  • Mark GRIFFITHS (Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom)
  • Anneke GOUDRIAAN (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Heather HAUSENBLAS (Jacksonville University, USA)
  • Tobias HAYER (University of Bremen, Germany)
  • Susumu HIGUCHI (National Hospital Organization Kurihama Medical and Addiction Center, Japan)
  • David HODGINS (University of Calgary, Canada)
  • Eric HOLLANDER (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA)
  • Jaeseung JEONG (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea)
  • Yasser KHAZAAL (Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland)
  • Orsolya KIRÁLY (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Emmanuel KUNTSCHE (La Trobe University, Australia)
  • Hae Kook LEE (The Catholic University of Korea, Republic of Korea)
  • Michel LEJOXEUX (Paris University, France)
  • Anikó MARÁZ (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
  • Giovanni MARTINOTTI (‘Gabriele d’Annunzio’ University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy)
  • Astrid MÜLLER  (Hannover Medical School, Germany)
  • Frederick GERARD MOELLER (University of Texas, USA)
  • Daniel Thor OLASON (University of Iceland, Iceland)
  • Nancy PETRY (University of Connecticut, USA)
  • Bettina PIKÓ (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Afarin RAHIMI-MOVAGHAR (Teheran University of Medical Sciences, Iran)
  • József RÁCZ (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary)
  • Rory C. REID (University of California Los Angeles, USA)
  • Marcantanio M. SPADA (London South Bank University, United Kingdom)
  • Daniel SPRITZER (Study Group on Technological Addictions, Brazil)
  • Dan J. STEIN (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
  • Sherry H. STEWART (Dalhousie University, Canada)
  • Attila SZABÓ (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Ferenc TÚRY (Semmelweis University, Hungary)
  • Alfred UHL (Austrian Federal Health Institute, Austria)
  • Róbert URBÁN  (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Johan VANDERLINDEN (University Psychiatric Center K.U.Leuven, Belgium)
  • Alexander E. VOISKOUNSKY (Moscow State University, Russia)
  • Aviv M. WEINSTEIN  (Ariel University, Israel)
  • Kimberly YOUNG (Center for Internet Addiction, USA)

 

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