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  • 1 Eötvös Loránd University, H-1117 Budapest, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/c
  • 2 Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1112 Budapest, Budaörsi út 45, Hungary
  • 3 HAS, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege Miklós út 29–33, Hungary
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A natural occurrence of a silica/clay nanocomposite material was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). High-resolution images show that this nanocomposite material consists of 5–20 nm thick slabs of smectite and tridymite/cristobalite layers with coincident normals. In spite of the brittle glass-like appearance of the nanocomposite material its colloidal properties are similar to those of pure smectite but partial loss of expansion capacity was detected upon glycerol solvation. The structural relationship between smectite and silica is interpreted based on the smectite structure model of Edelman and Favejee (1940) which supposes reversed tetrahedra in the SiO4 layer of the TOT structure. This structure model explains the presence of silica impurities in bentonites used as raw material and several geological standard montmorillonites.

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Editorial Board

  • Filippo Giannazzo - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (IMM), Catania, Italy
  • Werner Grogger - FELMI, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria
  • János Lábár - Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
  • Erik Manders - Faculty of Science, SILS, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Ohad Medalia - Department of Biochemistry, Zürich University, Zürich, Switzerland
  • Rainer Pepperkok - EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
  • Aleksander Recnik - J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • Sara Sandin - Division of Structural Biology & Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Nobuo Tanaka - Electron microscope Lab., Ecotopia Science Institute and Dept. of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Japan
  • Paul Verkade - Wolfson Bioimaging Facility, Schools of Biochemistry and Physiology & Pharmacology, Biomedical Sciences Building, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

Dr Pécz, Béla
Resolution and Discovery
Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science
Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
H-1525 Budapest, PO Box 49, Hungary
E-mail: pecz.bela@energia.mta.hu