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  • * Lakehead University, Canada
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Abstract

This article focuses on the issue of the relationship between constitutional recognition and constitutional imposition of identity. The Canadian state in its constitutional document describes itself as a liberal democracy governing a pluralist society. It also recognizes Aboriginal rights as constitutive. The first two elements have met with considerable success in terms of aligning state and citizen identity. This suggests that neutral constitutional identities or identities that respect individual diversity can be imposed successfully through the democratic process. However, these are not effective in meeting decolonizing objectives, which must instead be pursued through respecting Indigenous self-governance.

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  • 1.

    Cossette, Marc-André, ‘“Déjà vu” for First Nations women, as Ottawa seeks more time to rid Indian Act of sexism | CBC News’, (12 June 2017), online: cbcca <http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/indian-act-gender-discrimination-deja-vu-1.4153483> accessed 5 May 2018.

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  • 2.

    Prime Minister's Office, Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on meeting with National Aboriginal Organizations, (2015) <pm.gc.ca/eng/news/2015/12/16/statement-prime-minister-canada-meeting-national-aboriginal-organizations.> accessed 5 May 2018.

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  • 3.

    Thomson, AlyAbout 80,000 denied eligibility for Newfoundland first nation band’ (2017) Globe and Mail, online: <https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/only-18000-eligible-for-newfoundland-first-nation-band-its-discriminatory/article33925034/>, accessed 5 May 2018.

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2020  
Scimago
H-index
3
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,158
Scimago
Quartile Score
Law Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
40/78=0,5
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Law 447/722 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,202
Scopus
Cites
12
Scopus
Documents
0
Acceptance
Rate
84%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
2
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,128
Scimago
Quartile Score
Law Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
31/88=0,4
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Law 480/685 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,247
Scopus
Cites
22
Scopus
Documents
2
Acceptance
Rate
8%

 

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Hungarian Journal of Legal Studies
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
2016 (1959)
Publication
Programme
2020 Volume 61
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
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Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
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ISSN 2498-5473 (Print)
ISSN 2560-1067 (Online)