View More View Less
  • 1 University of Southern California
  • | 2 Northwestern University
  • | 3 Northwestern University
Full access

Semanticists often assume an ontology for natural language that includes not only ordinary objects, but also events, and other sorts of entities. We link this ontology to how speakers represent static and dynamic entities. Specifically, we test how speakers determine whether an entity counts as “atomic” by using count vs. mass (e.g., some gleebs, some gleeb) and distributive vs. non-distributive descriptions (e.g., gleeb every second or so, gleeb around a little). We then seek evidence for atomic representation in a non-linguistic task. Ultimately we suggest that natural language ontology reveals properties of language-independent conceptualization.

  • Acquaviva, Paolo. 2008. Lexical plurals: A morphosemantic approach. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • Bach, Emmnon. 1986a. The algebra of events. Linguistics and Philosophy 9. 516.

  • Bach, Emmon. 1986b. Natural language metaphysics. In R. B. Marcus, G. J. W. Dorn and P. Weingartner (eds.) Logic, methodology and philosophy of science VII. Amsterdam: North-Holland. 573595.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bach, Emmon and Wynn Chao. 2012. The metaphysics of natural language(s). In R. Kempson, T. Fernando and N. Asher (eds.) Handbook of philosophy of science. Volume 14: Philosophy of linguistics. London: Elsevier. 175196.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barner, David and Jesse Snedeker. 2006. Children’s early understanding of mass-count syntax: Individuation, lexical content, and the number asymmetry hypothesis. Language Learning and Development 2. 163194.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barner, David, Laura Wagner and Jesse Snedeker. 2008. Events and the ontology of individuals: Verbs as a source of individuating mass and count nouns. Cognition 106. 805832.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barr, Dale J., Roger Levy, Christoph Scheepers and Harry J. Tily. 2013. Random effects structure for confirmatory hypothesis testing: Keep it maximal. Journal of Memory and Language 68. 255278.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Boolos, George. 1981. For every A there is a B. Linguistic Inquiry 12. 465467.

  • Borer, Hagit. 2005. In name only. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • Casati, Roberto and Achille C. Varzi. 2008. Event concepts. In T. Shipley and J. Zacks (eds.) Understanding events. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 3153.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Champollion, Lucas. 2017. Parts of a whole: Distributivity as a bridge between aspect and measurement. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • Champollion, Lucas and Manfred Krifka. 2016. Mereology. In M. Aloni and P. Dekker (eds.) The Cambridge handbook of formal semantics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 512541.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chierchia, Gennaro. 1998. Plurality of mass nouns and the notion of “semantic parameter”. In S. Rothstein (ed.) Events and grammar. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 53103.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chomsky, Noam. 1965. Aspects of the theory of syntax. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

  • Chomsky, Noam. 1995. The minimalist program. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

  • Davidson, Donald. 1967. The logical form of action sentences. In N. Rescher (ed.) The logic of decision and action. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press. 8195.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Davidson, Donald. 1985. Adverbs of action. In B. Vermazen and M. B. Hintikka (eds.) Essays on Davidson: Actions and events. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 230241.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ferry, Alissa, Susan J. Hespos and Dedre Gentner. 2015. Prelinguistic relational concepts: Investigating analogical processing in infants. Child Development 86. 13861405.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gillon, Brendan S. 1992. Towards a common semantics for English count and mass nouns. Linguistics and Philosophy 15. 597639.

  • Gillon, Brendan S. 2012. Mass terms. Philosophy Compass 7. 712730.

  • Grimm, Scott. 2012. Number and individuation. Doctoral dissertation. Stanford University.

  • Henderson, Robert. 2013. Ways of pluralizing events. University of california, santa cruz. Doctoral dissertation.

  • Hespos, Susan J., Alissa Ferry and Lance Rips. 2009a. Five-month-old infants have different expectations for solids and liquids. Psychological Science 20. 603611.

  • Hespos, Susan J., Stacy Grossman and Megan M. Saylor. 2010. Infants’ ability to parse continuous action series: Further evidence. Neural Networks 23. 10261032.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hespos, Susan J., Megan M. Saylor and Stacy Grossman. 2009b. Infants’ ability to parse continuous actions. Developmental Psychology 45. 575585.

  • Hespos, Susan J. and Elizabeth S. Spelke. 2004. Conceptual precursors to spatial language. Nature 430. 453456.

  • Hoepelman, Jakob and Christian Rohrer. 1980. On the mass count distinction and the French imparfait and passé simple. In C. Rohrer (ed.) Time, tense and aspect. Tübingen: Niemeyer. 629664.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Koslicki, Katherin. 1997. Isolation and non-arbitrary division: Frege’s two criteria for counting. Synthese 112. 403430.

  • Krifka, Manfred. 1989. Nominal reference, temporal constitution and quantification in event semantics. In R. Bartsch, J. van Benthem and P. van Emde Boas (eds.) Semantics and contextual expression. Dordrecht: Foris. 75115.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lewis, David. 1970. General semantics. Synthese 22. 1867.

  • Lidz, Jeffrey, Justin Halberda, Paul Pietroski and Tim Hunter. 2011. Interface transparency and the psychosemantics of most. Natural Language Semantics 6. 227256.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Link, Godehard. 1983. The logical analysis of plurals and mass terms: A lattice-theoretical approach. In R. Bäuerle, C. Schwarze and A. von Stechow (eds.) Meaning, use and interpretation. Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter. 303323.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mathieu, Éric. 2012. Flavors of division. Linguistic Inquiry 43. 650667.

  • Montague, Richard. 1973. The proper treatment of quantification in ordinary English. In J. Hintikka, J. Moravcsik and P. Suppes (eds.) Approach to natural languages. Proceedings of the 1970. Stanford Workshop on Grammar and Semantics. Dordrecht: D. Reidel Publishing Company. 221247.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mourelatos, Alexander. 1978. Events, processes, and states. Linguistics and Philosophy 2. 415434.

  • Nosofsky, Robert M. 1984. Choice, similarity, and the context theory of classification. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 10. 104114.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ojeda, Almerindo. 2005. The paradox of mass plurals. In S. S. Mufwene, E. J. Francis and R. Wheeler (eds.) Polymorphous linguistics: Jim McCawley’s legacy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 389410.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Partee, Barbara H. 1979. Semantics – mathematics or psychology? In R. Bäuerle, U. Egli and A. von Stechow (eds.) Semantics from different points of view (Springer Series in Language and Communication 6). Berlin & New York: Springer-Verlag. 114.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pelletier, Francis J. 2011. Descriptive metaphysics, natural language metaphysics, Sapir–Whorf, and all that stuff: Evidence from the mass-count distinction. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 6. 146.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pietroski, Paul. 2010. Concepts, meanings, and truth: First nature, second nature, and hard work. Mind & Language 25. 247278.

  • Pietroski, Paul. 2015. Framing event variables. Erkenntnis 80. 3160.

  • Pietroski, Paul, Jeffrey Lidz, Tim Hunter and Justin Halberda. 2009. The meaning of most: Semantics, numerosity, and psychology. Mind & Language 24. 554585.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasada, Sandeep, Krag Ferenz and Todd Haskell. 2002. Conceiving of entities as objects and as stuff. Cognition 83. 141165.

  • Rips, Lance and Susan J. Hespos. 2015. Divisions of the physical world: Concepts of objects and substances. Psychological Bulletin 141. 786811.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rothstein, Susan. 1995. Adverbial quantification over events. Natural Language Semantics 3. 131.

  • Rothstein, Susan. 2004. Structuring events. Malden, MA & Oxford: Blackwell.

  • Rothstein, Susan. 2010. Counting and the mass/count distinction. Journal of Semantics 27. 343397.

  • Rothstein, Susan. 2017. Semantics for counting and measuring. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • Shepard, Roger N. 1962. The analysis of proximities: Multidimensional scaling with an unknown distance function Part I. Psychometrika 27. 125140.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Shepard, Roger N. 1964. Attention and the metric structure of stimulus space. Journal of Mathematical Psychology 1. 5487.

  • Sloman, Steven A. and Lance Rips. 1998. Similarity as an explanatory concept. Cognition 65. 87101.

  • Tversky, Amos. 1977. Features of similarity. Psychological review 84. 327352.

  • Vendler, Zeno. 1957. Verbs and times. Philosophical Review 66. 143160.

  • Vogel, Christopher A., Alexis Wellwood, Rachel Dudley and J. Brendan Ritchie. 2014. Talking about causing events. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic, and Communication 9. 122.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wellwood, Alexis. 2014. Measuring predicates. Doctoral dissertation. University of Maryland, College Park.

  • Wellwood, Alexis, Susan J. Hespos and Lance Rips. 2018. The object : substance :: event : process analogy. In T. Lombrozo, J. Knobe and S. Nichols (eds.) Oxford studies in experimental philosophy. Vol. 2. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 183212.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zacks, Jeff M. and Barbara Tversky. 2001. Event structure in perception and conception. Psychological Bulletin 127. 321.

  • Zucchi, Sandro and Michael White. 2001. Twigs, sequences and the temporal constitution of predicates. Linguistics and Philosophy 24. 223270.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE

Editors

Editor-in-Chief: András Cser

Editor: Éva Dékány

Review Editor: Tamás Halm

Editorial Board

  • Anne Abeillé / Université Paris Diderot
  • Željko Bošković / University of Connecticut
  • Marcel den Dikken / Eötvös Loránd University; Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Hans-Martin Gärtner / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Elly van Gelderen / Arizona State University
  • Anders Holmberg / Newcastle University
  • Katarzyna Jaszczolt / University of Cambridge
  • Dániel Z. Kádár / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • István Kenesei / University of Szeged; Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Anikó Lipták / Leiden University
  • Katalin Mády / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Gereon Müller / Leipzig University
  • Csaba Pléh / Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Central European University
  • Giampaolo Salvi / Eötvös Loránd University
  • Irina Sekerina / College of Staten Island CUNY
  • Péter Siptár / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Gregory Stump / University of Kentucky
  • Peter Svenonius / University of Tromsø
  • Anne Tamm / Károli Gáspár University of the Reformed Church
  • Akira Watanabe / University of Tokyo
  • Jeroen van de Weijer / Shenzhen University

 

Acta Linguistica Academica
Address: Benczúr u. 33. HU–1068 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: (+36 1) 351 0413; (+36 1) 321 4830 ext. 154
Fax: (36 1) 322 9297
E-mail: ala@nytud.mta.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Arts and Humanities Citation Index
  • Bibliographie Linguistique/Linguistic Bibliography
  • International Bibliographies IBZ and IBR
  • Linguistics Abstracts
  • Linguistics and Language Behaviour Abstracts
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • SCOPUS
  • Social Science Citation Index
  • LinguisList

 

2020

 

Total Cites

219

WoS

Journal
Impact Factor

0,523

Rank by

Linguistics 150/193 (Q4)

Impact Factor

 

Impact Factor

0,432

without

Journal Self Cites

5 Year

0,500

Impact Factor

Journal 

0,72

Citation Indicator

 

Rank by Journal 

Linguistics 144/259 (Q3)

Citation Indicator 

 

Citable

19

Items

Total

19

Articles

Total

0

Reviews

Scimago

10

H-index

Scimago

0,295

Journal Rank

Scimago

Cultural Studies Q1

Quartile Score

Language and Linguistics Q2

 

Linguistics and Language Q2

 

Literature and Literary Theory Q1

Scopus

72/87=0,8

Scite Score

Scopus

Literature and Literary Theory 42/825 (Q1)

Scite Score Rank

Cultural Studies 247/1037 (Q1)

Scopus

1,022

SNIP

Days from 

58

sumbission

to acceptance

Days from 

68

acceptance

to publication

Acceptance

51%

Rate

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
155
Impact Factor 0,222
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,156
5 Year
Impact Factor
0,322
Immediacy
Index
0,870
Citable
Items
23
Total
Articles
23
Total
Reviews
0
Cited
Half-Life
11,2
Citing
Half-Life
16,6
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00006
Article Influence
Score
0,056
% Articles
in
Citable Items
100,00
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,00780
Average
IF
Percentile
9,358
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,281
Scopus
Scite Score
53/85=0,6
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Cultural Studies 293/1002 (Q2)
Literature and Literary Theory 60/823(Q1)
Scopus
SNIP
0,768
Acceptance
Rate
25%

 

Acta Linguistica Academica
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 900 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription Information Online subsscription: 544 EUR / 680 USD
Print + online subscription: 624 EUR / 780 USD
Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles are sold on the displayed price.

Acta Linguistica Academica
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
2017
Publication
Programme
2021 Volume 68
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2559-8201 (Print)
ISSN 2560-1016 (Online)