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This special issue of Acta Linguistica Academica is the second volume of selected papers from the thirteenth Conference on Syntax, Phonology, and Language Analysis (SinFonIJA 13). An international linguistics conference, SinFonIJA is held annually at hosting institutions in the region of the former Yugoslavia and Austria-Hungary, and features work carried out in all areas of formal linguistics. SinFonIJA 13 was held at the Research Institute for Linguistics in Budapest (now the Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics) in September 2020. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the conference took place online, with talks and poster presentations delivered in real time.

In the fall of 2020, Acta Linguistica Academica accepted our proposal for two special collections. The first volume appeared in December 2021 (Volume 68, Issue 4), and focused on contributions in syntax, morpho-syntax, and semantics. The present issue is the second of the two, and includes papers on phonology, phonetics, syntax, and semantics.

In Unstressed vowels in English: Distributions and consequences, Péter Szigetvári builds on Trager & Bloch (1941) and Szigetvári (2016) and provides further evidence for the claim that diphthongs in (British) English are short vowels followed by consonants (glides). Novel evidence, presented in the paper, comes from the distribution of unstressed vowels in British English. Phenomena that are brought to bear on the analysis include the parallelism between the vocalic components of diphthongs and unstressable short vowels, and the realization of diphthongs in unstressed positions.

Eirini Apostolopoulou in her paper Place of articulation shifts in sound change: A gradual road to the unmarked shows how markedness of codas is reduced in the diachronic development of Italiot Greek. The paper focuses on the changes that affect heterosyllabic clusters consisting of a non-coronal and a coronal consonant, and proposes three stages of change: (a) no shift; (b) dorsal > labial shift, and (c) dorsal, labial > coronal shift. The diachronic process is accounted for in terms of Rice's (1994) model of the place node, de Lacy's (2002) markedness hierarchy, and Alber & Prince's (2015) Property Theory.

Sebastian Bredemann's paper The role of phonology in Vata adjectival agreement provides novel evidence in favor of integrational theories of the morphology-phonology interface (e.g., Wolf 2008), as opposed to the separational ones (Halle and Marantz 1993). According to the former, the general phonology of a language can influence Vocabulary Insertion; according to the latter, Vocabulary Insertion does not interact with the phonological component of the grammar. The paper offers new evidence from adjectival agreement in Vata, where the shape of the agreement morpheme is determined by the phonology of the adjectival stem. This pattern can be straightforwardly accounted for under an integrational approach – but not a separational one.

Kata Baditzné Pálvölgyi's paper Tonal peaks in the spontaneous speech of vantage level Hungarian learners of Spanish investigates how Hungarian-speaking learners of Spanish realize tonal peaks, especially the first tonal peak, in their Spanish utterances. The paper reports on a production study that included native Spanish speakers and Hungarian-speaking learners. The two groups align on many of the parameters tested – e.g., the frequency of the first tonal peak occurring on an utterance-initial unstressed syllable or the unstressed syllable immediately preceding the first stressed one. The crucial difference between the two groups lies in the fact that, for native speakers but not for Hungarian-speaking learners, the first tonal peak is commonly the highest one in the whole utterance.

Chen-An Chang in her paper Self-addressed questions and honorifics: The case of Japanese daroo-ka/desyoo-ka focuses on self-addressed questions (SAQs) in Japanese that include the modals daroo-ka/desyoo-ka. The paper presents the results of an experiment aimed at investigating whether questions with daroo-ka/desyoo-ka can be judged as felicitous if used in non-solitary contexts. The results show that Japanese SAQs can be felicitously uttered in the presence of a person who is perceived as having higher social standing. Additionally, the results of another (pilot) study are presented, demonstrating that daroo-ka questions can be interpreted as canonical questions in the performance of indirect speech acts.

In Q-particles and islands in Sinhala wh- and polar questions, Maribel Romero and Erlinde Meertens consider the semantic composition of wh- and polar questions in Sinhala. They examine the properties of the Q-particle and, based on novel evidence from the distribution of with respect to islands, propose a new approach to the semantics of questions in Sinhala. According to previous analyses (Cable 2010; Slade 2011), questions in Sinhala contain a two-legged semantic dependency, with the lower leg projecting a set of alternatives, the upper leg forming a choice-function dependency, and mediating between the two. The current paper, instead, proposes that the upper leg passes up the Kratzerian focus value [[.]]h (Kratzer 1991), and the Q-particle , mediating between these two legs, acts as a converter from Roothian to Kratzerian focus semantics.

Marcin Wągiel's paper A typology of proportional quantifiers: Evidence from Polish partitives shows that Polish proportional quantifiers fall into four classes, based on (in)compatibility with i) numerals and measure words, ii) approximative modifiers, and iii) cumulative predicates, as well as iv) spatial integrity effects (or lack thereof). The paper derives this typology from the interaction between scalar and mereotopological properties of proportional quantifiers and shows that it is necessary to combine degree semantics with a mereotopological approach in the nominal domain.

We would like to thank the authors, the anonymous reviewers of the manuscripts in the volume, as well as Marcel den Dikken, who took part in organizing SinFonIJA 13.

References

  • Alber, Birgit and Alan Prince . 2015. Outline of property theory. Ms. UniVR, Verona/Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ.

  • Cable, Seth . 2010. The grammar of Q. Q-particles, wh-movement and pied-piping. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • de Lacy, Paul . 2002. The formal expression of markedness. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

  • Halle, Morris , and Alec Marantz . 1993. Distributed morphology and the pieces of inflection. In K. Hale and S.J. Keyser (eds.) The view from building 20: Essays in honor of Sylvain Bromberger. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 111176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kratzer, Angelika . 1991. The representation of focus. In A. von Stechow and D. Wunderlich (eds.) Semantics: An international handbook of contemporary research. Walter de Gruyter, New York, pp. 825834.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rice, Keren . 1994. Peripheral in consonants. Canadian Journal of Linguistics 39. 191216.

  • Slade, Benjamin . 2011. Formal and philological inquiries into the nature of interrogatives, indefinites, disjunction, and focus in Sinhala and other languages. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Szigetvári, Péter . 2016. No diphthong, no problem. In E. Cyran and J. Szpyra-Kozłowska (eds.) Phonology, its faces and interfaces. Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main, pp. 123141.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Trager, George L. and Bernard Bloch . 1941. The syllabic phonemes of English. Language 17. 223246.

  • Wolf, Mathew A . 2008. Optimal interleaving: Serial phonology-morphology interaction in a constraint-based model. PhD dissertation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Alber, Birgit and Alan Prince . 2015. Outline of property theory. Ms. UniVR, Verona/Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ.

  • Cable, Seth . 2010. The grammar of Q. Q-particles, wh-movement and pied-piping. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

  • de Lacy, Paul . 2002. The formal expression of markedness. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

  • Halle, Morris , and Alec Marantz . 1993. Distributed morphology and the pieces of inflection. In K. Hale and S.J. Keyser (eds.) The view from building 20: Essays in honor of Sylvain Bromberger. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 111176.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kratzer, Angelika . 1991. The representation of focus. In A. von Stechow and D. Wunderlich (eds.) Semantics: An international handbook of contemporary research. Walter de Gruyter, New York, pp. 825834.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rice, Keren . 1994. Peripheral in consonants. Canadian Journal of Linguistics 39. 191216.

  • Slade, Benjamin . 2011. Formal and philological inquiries into the nature of interrogatives, indefinites, disjunction, and focus in Sinhala and other languages. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Szigetvári, Péter . 2016. No diphthong, no problem. In E. Cyran and J. Szpyra-Kozłowska (eds.) Phonology, its faces and interfaces. Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main, pp. 123141.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Trager, George L. and Bernard Bloch . 1941. The syllabic phonemes of English. Language 17. 223246.

  • Wolf, Mathew A . 2008. Optimal interleaving: Serial phonology-morphology interaction in a constraint-based model. PhD dissertation, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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Editors

Editor-in-Chief: András Cser

Editor: György Rákosi

Review Editor: Tamás Halm

Editorial Board

  • Anne Abeillé / Université Paris Diderot
  • Željko Bošković / University of Connecticut
  • Marcel den Dikken / Eötvös Loránd University; Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Hans-Martin Gärtner / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Elly van Gelderen / Arizona State University
  • Anders Holmberg / Newcastle University
  • Katarzyna Jaszczolt / University of Cambridge
  • Dániel Z. Kádár / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • István Kenesei / University of Szeged; Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Anikó Lipták / Leiden University
  • Katalin Mády / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Gereon Müller / Leipzig University
  • Csaba Pléh / Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Central European University
  • Giampaolo Salvi / Eötvös Loránd University
  • Irina Sekerina / College of Staten Island CUNY
  • Péter Siptár / Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics, Budapest
  • Gregory Stump / University of Kentucky
  • Peter Svenonius / University of Tromsø
  • Anne Tamm / Károli Gáspár University of the Reformed Church
  • Akira Watanabe / University of Tokyo
  • Jeroen van de Weijer / Shenzhen University

 

Acta Linguistica Academica
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2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
63
Journal Impact Factor 0,690
Rank by Impact Factor

Linguistics 145/194

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,667
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,286
Journal Citation Indicator 0,67
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Language & Linguistics 141/370

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
11
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,341
Scimago Quartile Score Cultural Studies (Q1)
Linguistics and Language (Q1)
Literature and Literary Theory (Q1)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1,4
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Literature and Literary Theory 22/934 (D1)
Cultural Studies 164/1127 (Q1)
Scopus
SNIP
1,070

2020

 

Total Cites

219

WoS

Journal
Impact Factor

0,523

Rank by

Linguistics 150/193 (Q4)

Impact Factor

 

Impact Factor

0,432

without

Journal Self Cites

5 Year

0,500

Impact Factor

Journal 

0,72

Citation Indicator

 

Rank by Journal 

Linguistics 144/259 (Q3)

Citation Indicator 

 

Citable

19

Items

Total

19

Articles

Total

0

Reviews

Scimago

10

H-index

Scimago

0,295

Journal Rank

Scimago

Cultural Studies Q1

Quartile Score

Language and Linguistics Q2

 

Linguistics and Language Q2

 

Literature and Literary Theory Q1

Scopus

72/87=0,8

Scite Score

Scopus

Literature and Literary Theory 42/825 (Q1)

Scite Score Rank

Cultural Studies 247/1037 (Q1)

Scopus

1,022

SNIP

Days from 

58

submission

to acceptance

Days from 

68

acceptance

to publication

Acceptance

51%

Rate

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
155
Impact Factor 0,222
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,156
5 Year
Impact Factor
0,322
Immediacy
Index
0,870
Citable
Items
23
Total
Articles
23
Total
Reviews
0
Cited
Half-Life
11,2
Citing
Half-Life
16,6
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00006
Article Influence
Score
0,056
% Articles
in
Citable Items
100,00
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,00780
Average
IF
Percentile
9,358
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,281
Scopus
Scite Score
53/85=0,6
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Cultural Studies 293/1002 (Q2)
Literature and Literary Theory 60/823(Q1)
Scopus
SNIP
0,768
Acceptance
Rate
25%

 

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Acta Linguistica Academica
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
2017 (1951)
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia   
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2559-8201 (Print)
ISSN 2560-1016 (Online)