Authors:
Nacer Chouchane Laboratory of Civil Engineering, Hydraulics, Sustainable Development and Environment (LAR-GHYDE), University Mohamed Khider-Biskra, 07000, Algeria

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Hammam Chouchane University Mentouri Brothers Constantine, 2500, Algeria

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Tesnim Chouchane University of Algiers -1- Benyoucef Benkhedda, 1600, Algeria

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Abstract

In order to improve the thermal performance of heat exchangers and air collectors, we insert various forms of artificial roughness, known as ribs, into the useful duct. These ribs promote the creation of turbulent flows and enhance heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation.

However, the introduction of these ribs leads to an increase in pressure drop, requiring higher mechanical power to pump the heat transfer fluid. This experimental study focuses on estimating, using empirical approaches, the pressure losses induced by rectangular ribs with an inclined top. The ribs are made from 0.4 mm galvanized sheet steel.

An experimental set-up was designed to measure the head losses generated by the ribs, from the point of entry to the point of exit from the useful duct. Using the dimensional analysis method, correlations were established to evaluate head losses as a function of flow regime and rib geometry and configuration (including different geometries for rib arrangement over the configuration area).

Abstract

In order to improve the thermal performance of heat exchangers and air collectors, we insert various forms of artificial roughness, known as ribs, into the useful duct. These ribs promote the creation of turbulent flows and enhance heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation.

However, the introduction of these ribs leads to an increase in pressure drop, requiring higher mechanical power to pump the heat transfer fluid. This experimental study focuses on estimating, using empirical approaches, the pressure losses induced by rectangular ribs with an inclined top. The ribs are made from 0.4 mm galvanized sheet steel.

An experimental set-up was designed to measure the head losses generated by the ribs, from the point of entry to the point of exit from the useful duct. Using the dimensional analysis method, correlations were established to evaluate head losses as a function of flow regime and rib geometry and configuration (including different geometries for rib arrangement over the configuration area).

Introduction

The addition of ribs in the fluid flow stream has an essential objective in optimizing the thermal performance of heat exchangers and particularly in air-mounted solar collectors. To intensify the heat exchange between the exchanges surfaces, various methods are used, among them the addition of metallic obstacles assimilated to artificial roughnesses along the flow plane of the fluid path, which has proved to be of remarkable importance.

Ribs have multiple roles; they contribute to the reduction of dead zones in the liquid stream and enhance the transfer of heat by creating a turbulent flux in the airflow. Their presence translates into significantly higher losses.

Several works were carried out in this field by several authors; we can quote the following works:

Bhagora et al. (2002), Karwa et al. (1999), and Layek et al. (2007, 2009) have treated in their studies the increase of the thermal efficiency of the flux in a rectangular channel provided with transverse ribs, and have also examined the influence of the following geometrical parameters as represented by Fig. 1

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Geometric parameters of the transverse ribs shaped as ribs

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

.

Chaube et al. (2006), Prasad and Saini (1980, 1988, 1991) and Verrma and Prasad (2000) treated only continuous transverse ribs (Fig. 2). They confirmed that the maximum local convective exchange is at the connection points of the flow. They used the coefficient of performance as a parameter for comparison between the different rib configurations and the smooth case.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Continuous rib configurations

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

Instead of using transverse ribs that occupy the entire width of the flow duct (continuous rib), a variant consists of placing discontinuous ribs as shown in Fig. 3 from the study by Cavallero and Tanda (2002). In their studies, they also compared the different configurations shown in Fig. 3 with the smooth case, and the comparison is made here at a fixed and identical flow rate for all the above cases (not at identical pressure losses). The results give, for the continuous transversal ribs, an exchange coefficient of about 2 times compared to the smooth case and of three times for the discontinuous ribs.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Continuous and discontinuous rib configurations

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

Tanda (2004) performed an experimental study on many different rib configurations. For given pressure losses, he found two configurations with equivalent convective transfer levels. These two configurations are shown in Fig. 4a and b.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Discontinuous rib configurations

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

It is difficult to conclude from the results of Tanda (2004) since he often varied more than one parameter at a time from one configuration to the other; however, it appears that discontinuous ribs offer better thermal performance than continuous ribs.

Tanda (2004), Karwa (2003), Momin et al. (2002), Bhagoria et al. (2002) have performed some works on V-shaped ribs.

The work carried out by Tanda (2004) on V-shaped ribs (Fig. 5), shows that this configuration of ribs is less efficient in comparison with those of continuous transverse shapes, it is however not the result of several authors who also studied similar configurations with this type of fins.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Duct with ribs arranged in a staggered V-shape

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

The work of Karwa (2003) and Momin et al. (2002) prove that the best performance is achieved when there is a V-shaped configuration against the flow.

Jaurker et al. (2006) use grooves between two ribs. The results obtained show that in this configuration, the convective exchanges are better than those obtained with ribs in the form of transverse ribs, while the friction coefficient is slightly higher as illustrated in Fig. 6.

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Configuration with ribs and grooves

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

In the present work, ribs of rectangular shape are implanted normally to the plane of the flow duct in several rows, with an inclined upper part (Fig. 7). This configuration has multiple reasons:

Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Rib shapes (rectangular rib)

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

  1. -Creation of vortices with vertical axes on the flow plane due to sudden narrowing and widening because of reduced spaces between two ribs of the same row.
  2. -The inclined parts of the r form abrupt narrowings and widenings concerning the plane above the flow, which allows the creation of vortices with horizontal axes (Fig. 8) (According to the horizontal axis).
    Fig. 8.
    Fig. 8.

    Scheme of fluid interaction with the ribs

    Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

  3. -The combined alternation of vertical and horizontal vortices creates disorder along the flowing moving air stream, which intensifies turbulence and significantly improves convective heat transfer.

Experimental devices

The mechanical engineering department of the University Mohamed khider-Biskra is where the experimental device is produced. It is a cylindrical plastic duct with an overall length of 12 m and a diameter of 160 mm (Fig. 9).

Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Experimental device

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

Rectangular aluminum ribs with two parts represent artificial roughness; one part is 1 cm wide with another inclined upper part of 1.5 cm. The incidences of the upper part inclined are 30°, 60°, 120° and 150°.

Inside the duct, the ribs are arranged in two main configurations. One of the configurations is arranged in a uniform row and the other in a random row (Fig. 10a and b). An aspirator provides the airflow and the pressure losses will be measured with a differential pressure sensor. This experimental study consists in measuring the pressure losses between the front and the back of the duct depending on the rate of air volume flow and for various rib arrangements and setups.

Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

Rib arrangement scheme

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

The measurements of the pressure losses were initially measured for a smooth tube (without ribs) and this is for different values of flow. Secondly, the measurements were made for the various rib configurations (Fig. 10a and b).

Obtained results

The acquired findings demonstrate that, particularly for the 60° and 120° incidences, the pressure losses measured are further amplified in the presence of the ribs. The pressure losses are more significant in the case of the rib arrangement than when they are aligned in rows when the space between the ribs and the rows is reduced (Figs 11 and 12).

Fig. 11.
Fig. 11.

Evolution of pressure losses depending on the volume flow when there is rectangular ribs arranged in rows versus a smooth duct Case: (Lch=2cm,Pe.ch=5cm,Pe.r=6.37cm,i=300,1500,600,1200)

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

Fig. 12.
Fig. 12.

Evolution of pressure losses depending on the volume flow when there is rectangular ribs in staggered arrangement versus a smooth duct Case: (Lch=3cm,Pe.ch=5cm,Pe.r=9.5cm,i=300,1500,600,1200)

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

Interpretations of experimental results

From the graphs showing pressure drop versus volume flow, we can see that for all configurations generated in the pipe, the pressure drop becomes greater with the presence of ribs than with a smooth pipe (without ribs).

Analysis of pressure drop trends shows that an increase in the pitch between rows or in the pitch between ribs reduces the pressure drop.

As an example, for a common volume flow Qv=0.068m3s.m2 and for a rib pitch Pe.ch=5cm and a row pitch Pe.r=6.37cm, the pressure drop reaches a value of 75.8Pascal, when the pitch between the ribs becomes Pe.ch=10cm, and the pitch between the rows Pe.r=10.5cm, the pressure drop decreases to 62.9pascal.

Contrary to the previous analysis, there is proportionality between the length of the ribs LCH and the rise in pressure drop, where we see that for a common volume flow Qv=0.017m3s.m2 and an identical pitch between ribs Pe.ch=5cm, and for a length of ribs LCH=2cm the pressure drop is 7.6pascal but as the length increases Lch=3cm the pressure drop also increases to 8pascal.

Slight deviations from the pressure drop values measured at the various incidences of the upper part of the ribs are noticeable. This is reflected in two phenomena: air slippage in relation to the upper part inclined at 30°,60° and braking at incidences of 150°and120°, see Fig. 8.

Establishment of the mathematical model of pressure loss calculation

To relate the pressure losses caused by the ribs and their geometrical characteristics as well as the physical parameters of the flowing fluid, we established a general relation based on the fundamental dimensions using the dimensional analysis approach (Vashy-Buckingham theorem), which has the following form:
P=P(ρ,DH,V,μ,ε,L,Pe.ch,Pe.r,Lch)

The π of Vashy-Bukingham theorem states that there are only six possible independent groups. So let us write it as follows, with

L = Constant or L being the length of the cylindrical duct.
(PL=π.k.ρα.DHβ.Vγ.μx.εy.Pe.rz.Pe.cht.Lchw)
The writing of Eq. (2) taking into account the fundamental dimensions, after development and identification we get a system of three equations, whose solution provides the general expression shown below:
P=12LDHρ.V2.[(ρvDHμ)x.(εDH)y×(Pe.chDH)z.(Pe.rDH)t.((LchDH))w]
Introducing the Reynolds number, the expression (3) becomes:
P=12LDHρ.[(Re)x.(εDH)y×(Pe.chDH)z.(Pe.rDH)t.((LchDH))w].V2
The identification with respect to the general equation of the pressure losses allows us to obtain a coefficient of the pressure losses λ given by the expression:
λ=[(Re)x.(εDH)y×(Pe.chDH)z.(Pe.rDH)t.((LchDH))w]
A simple development of Eq. (3)' gives us:
ln(2PDHLρV2)=xln((Re))+yln((εDH))+zln((Pe.chDH))+tln((Pe.rDH))+wln(LchDH)

Ribs arranged in rows

In the case of a turbulent regime, the identification of the geometric parameters of the ribs with respect to the relation (5) which gives in its developed form ΔΡ , allows to obtain several systems of equations.

We derive the system of equations by using the relation (5):
[Ai,j].X=[B]/[i=1,,nj=1,,5n=100]

We notice that the matrix Ai,j is not square.

The least squares approach is used to solve this system:
Ai,jT.Ai,jX=Ai,jT.[B]/[i=1,.,nj=1,,5n=100[Ai,j]T:MatrixtransposeofAi,j]
We obtain a system of equations:
[Ai,jT.Ai,j]X=Ai,jT.B=Ck,mX=Dl.f/[k=1,.,5m=1,,5l=1,.,5f=1]

By the Gaussian elimination, we find the solutions.

We replace the solutions in Eq. (3)' and obtain the following correlation:
ΔP=12LDHρ[(Re)0.9414.(εDH)3.992×(Pe.chDH)3.9334×(Pe.rDH)5.8817.(LchDH)4.9624].V2
And therefore the pressure loss coefficient is:
λ=[(Re)0.9414.(εDH)3.992×(Pe.chDH)3.9334×(Pe.rDH)5.8817.(LchDH)4.9624]

The same procedure of calculation is followed for the other studied cases, which means that in the interval of the turbulent regime one arrives at practically the same expression of the pressure losses.

For a laminar flow regime Re2100, the expression of the pressure losses is as follows:
ΔP=12LDHρ[(Re)1.2031.(εDH)0.2627×(Pe.chDH)0.6427×(Pe.rDH)0.7942.(LchDH)0.8135].V2
Whose pressure loss coefficient is:
λ=[(Re)1.2031.(εDH)0.2627×(Pe.chDH)0.6427×(Pe.rDH)0.7942.(LchDH)0.8135]

Ribs arranged in staggered rows

The same experimental approach is also performed with this arrangement, which allowed us to obtain the following correlations.
  1. For a turbulent flow regime:
ΔP=12LDHρ[(Re)0.9046.((εDH)4.381×(Pe.chDH)4.1435×(Pe.rDH)5.8853.(LchDH)5.1682].V2
And consequently a pressure loss coefficient λ:
λ=[(Re)0.9046.((εDH)4.381×(Pe.chDH)4.1435×(Pe.rDH)5.8853.(LchDH)5.1682]
  1. For the laminar flow regime:
ΔP=12LDHρ[(Re)1.2675.(εDH)0.3243×(Pe.chDH)0.2084×(Pe.rDH)1.5326.(LchDH)0.096].V2
For which the pressure loss coefficient is:
λ=[(Re)1.2675.(εDH)0.3243×(Pe.chDH)0.2084×(Pe.rDH)1.5326.(LchDH)0.096]

Evolution of the pressure losses coefficient λ depending on Reynolds

From the developed correlations, which express the pressure loss coefficient based on the ribs' taken-in geometrical characteristics, on the geometry of disposition and on the flow regime, it was possible to elaborate graphs which show the evolution of λ depending on the Reynolds number, for the different configurations of the ribs studied in relation to a smooth duct, on the other hand, in order to verify the accuracy of the numerical process adjustment followed in this work, and the good agreement of the empirical models developed with others encountered in the literature, in particular with those of Blasius & all, S. K. Verma & all, Chaube & all and Bhagoria & all, whose analysis of the evolution of the pressure loss coefficients illustrated in Fig. 13 shows the agreement of the empirical models related to the configurations of the ribs studied.

Fig. 13.
Fig. 13.

Pressure loss coefficient λ depending on Reynolds, compared with the Blasius, S.K. Verma, Chaube and Bhagora models (Row ribs)

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, 1; 10.1556/446.2023.00071

Conclusion

The correlations obtained make it possible to estimate the pressure losses in a rectangular duct, whose flow plane is occupied by obstacles of various shapes and arrangements. The recorded measurements of the pressure drop show that they are more important with the staggered arrangement of the ribs, especially for the strong incidences of the inclined part of them.

The empirical equations established will constitute technical support for future studies, which are essential to enhance heat exchangers' thermal efficiency and particularly of flat air-mounted solar collectors.

For other shapes, the general equation is still applicable, which will be the subject of further comprehensive studies, whose main interest is to be able to imagine the optimal shapes that will contribute to improving the heat exchange and in this case, will give a compromise between the pressure losses generated and the output temperature obtained.

Acknowledgements

Not applicable.

Nomenclature

P

Pressure losses [Pascal]

ρ

Density of the air kg/m3

DH

Hydraulic diameter [m]

V

air velocity [m/s]

μ

Dynamic viscosity [Kg/m.s]

ε

Absolute roughness [m]

L

Duct length [m]

Pe.ch

Steps between the ribs [m]

Pe.r

Steps between two successive rows of ribs [m]

Lch

Length of a rib [m]

C-R-2

Rectangular rib 2 [cm] long

C-R-3

Rectangular rib 3 [cm] long

References

  • Bhagoria, J.L., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2002). Heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations for rectangular solar air heater duct having transverse wedge shaped rib roughness on the absorber plate. Renewable Energy, 25: 341369. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0960-1481(01)00057-X.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavallero, D. and Tanda, G. (2002). An experimental investigation of forced convection heat transfer in channels with rib turbulators by means of liquid crystal thermography. Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, 26(2–4): 115121. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0894-1777(02)00117-6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chaube, A., Sahoo, P.K., and Solanki, S.C. (2006). Analysis of heat transfer augmentation and flow characteristics due to rib roughness over obserber plate of a solar air heater. Renewable Energy, (3): 317331. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2005.01.012.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jauker, A.R., Saini, J.S., and Gandhi, B.K. (2006). Heat transfer and friction characteristics of rectangular solar air heater duct using – grooved artificial roughness. Solar Energy, 80(8): 895907. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2005.08.006.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Karwa, R. (2003). Experimental studies of augmented heat transfer and friction in asymmetrically heated rectangular ducts with ribs on the heated wall in transverse, inclined, v-continuous and v-discrete pattern. Heat and Mass Transfer, 30(2): 241250. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1933(03)00035-6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Karwa, R., Solanki, S.C., and Saini, J.S. (1999). Heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations for the transient flow regime in rib–roughened rectangular ducts. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 42(9): 15971615. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0017-9310(98)00252-X.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Layek, A., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2007). Heat transfer and friction characteristics for artificially roughened ducts with compound turbulators. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 50: 48454854. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2007.02.042.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Layek, A., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2009). Effect of chamfering on heat transfer and friction characteristics of solar air heated having absorber plate roughened with compound turbulators. Renewable Energy, 34: 12921298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2008.09.016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Momin, A.M.E., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2002). Heat transfer and friction in solar air heater duct with Vshaped rib roughness on absorber plate. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 45(16): 33833396, July. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0017-9310(02)00046-7.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasad, B.N. and Saini, J.S. (1980). Effect of artificial roughness on heat transfer and friction factor in solar air-heaters. Solar Energy, 41(6): 505560. https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(88)90058-8.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasad, B.N. and Saini, J.S. (1988). Effect of artificial roughness on heat transfer and friction factor in a solar air heater. Solar Energy, 41: 555560. https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(88)90058-8.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasad, B.N. and Saini, J.S. (1991). Optimal thermohydrolic performance of artificially roughened solar air heating. Solar Energy, 47(2): 9196. https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(91)90039-Y.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tanda, G. (2004). Heat transfer in rectangular channels with transverse and V-shaped broken ribs. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 47: 229243. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0017-9310(03)00414-9.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Verrma, S.K. and Prasad, B.N. (2000). Investigation for the optimal thermo hydraulic performance of artificially roughened solar air heaters. Renewable Energy, 20: 1936. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0960-1481(99)00081-6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bhagoria, J.L., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2002). Heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations for rectangular solar air heater duct having transverse wedge shaped rib roughness on the absorber plate. Renewable Energy, 25: 341369. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0960-1481(01)00057-X.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cavallero, D. and Tanda, G. (2002). An experimental investigation of forced convection heat transfer in channels with rib turbulators by means of liquid crystal thermography. Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science, 26(2–4): 115121. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0894-1777(02)00117-6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chaube, A., Sahoo, P.K., and Solanki, S.C. (2006). Analysis of heat transfer augmentation and flow characteristics due to rib roughness over obserber plate of a solar air heater. Renewable Energy, (3): 317331. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2005.01.012.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Jauker, A.R., Saini, J.S., and Gandhi, B.K. (2006). Heat transfer and friction characteristics of rectangular solar air heater duct using – grooved artificial roughness. Solar Energy, 80(8): 895907. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.solener.2005.08.006.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Karwa, R. (2003). Experimental studies of augmented heat transfer and friction in asymmetrically heated rectangular ducts with ribs on the heated wall in transverse, inclined, v-continuous and v-discrete pattern. Heat and Mass Transfer, 30(2): 241250. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1933(03)00035-6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Karwa, R., Solanki, S.C., and Saini, J.S. (1999). Heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations for the transient flow regime in rib–roughened rectangular ducts. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 42(9): 15971615. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0017-9310(98)00252-X.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Layek, A., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2007). Heat transfer and friction characteristics for artificially roughened ducts with compound turbulators. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 50: 48454854. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2007.02.042.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Layek, A., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2009). Effect of chamfering on heat transfer and friction characteristics of solar air heated having absorber plate roughened with compound turbulators. Renewable Energy, 34: 12921298. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2008.09.016.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Momin, A.M.E., Saini, J.S., and Solanki, S.C. (2002). Heat transfer and friction in solar air heater duct with Vshaped rib roughness on absorber plate. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 45(16): 33833396, July. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0017-9310(02)00046-7.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasad, B.N. and Saini, J.S. (1980). Effect of artificial roughness on heat transfer and friction factor in solar air-heaters. Solar Energy, 41(6): 505560. https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(88)90058-8.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasad, B.N. and Saini, J.S. (1988). Effect of artificial roughness on heat transfer and friction factor in a solar air heater. Solar Energy, 41: 555560. https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(88)90058-8.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prasad, B.N. and Saini, J.S. (1991). Optimal thermohydrolic performance of artificially roughened solar air heating. Solar Energy, 47(2): 9196. https://doi.org/10.1016/0038-092X(91)90039-Y.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tanda, G. (2004). Heat transfer in rectangular channels with transverse and V-shaped broken ribs. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 47: 229243. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0017-9310(03)00414-9.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Verrma, S.K. and Prasad, B.N. (2000). Investigation for the optimal thermo hydraulic performance of artificially roughened solar air heaters. Renewable Energy, 20: 1936. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0960-1481(99)00081-6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Felföldi, József

Chair of the Editorial Board Szendrő, Péter

Editorial Board

  • Beke, János (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineerin, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Fenyvesi, László (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Szendrő, Péter (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Felföldi, József (Szent István University, Faculty of Food Science, Budapest – Hungary)

 

Advisory Board

  • De Baerdemaeker, Josse (KU Leuven, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Leuven - Belgium)
  • Funk, David B. (United States Department of Agriculture | USDA • Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA), Kansas City – USA
  • Geyer, Martin (Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Department of Horticultural Engineering, Potsdam - Germany)
  • Janik, József (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Kutzbach, Heinz D. (Institut für Agrartechnik, Fg. Grundlagen der Agrartechnik, Universität Hohenheim – Germany)
  • Mizrach, Amos (Institute of Agricultural Engineering. ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan – Israel)
  • Neményi, Miklós (Széchenyi University, Department of Biosystems and Food Engineering, Győr – Hungary)
  • Schulze-Lammers, Peter (University of Bonn, Institute of Agricultural Engineering (ILT), Bonn – Germany)
  • Sitkei, György (University of Sopron, Institute of Wood Engineering, Sopron – Hungary)
  • Sun, Da-Wen (University College Dublin, School of Biosystems and Food Engineering, Agriculture and Food Science, Dublin – Ireland)
  • Tóth, László (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)

Prof. Felföldi, József
Institute: MATE - Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Department of Measurements and Process Control
Address: 1118 Budapest Somlói út 14-16
E-mail: felfoldi.jozsef@uni-mate.hu

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Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.191
Scimago Quartile Score

Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Industrial Manufacturing Engineering (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1.1
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Agricultural and Biological Sciences 141/213 (34th PCTL)
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 104/147 (29th PCTL)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 261/355 (26th PCTL)
Mechanical Engineering 494/631 (21st PCTL)
Environmental Engineering 145/184 (21st PCTL)
 
Scopus
SNIP
0.222

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
not indexed
Journal Impact Factor not indexed
Rank by Impact Factor

not indexed

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,141
Scimago Quartile Score Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (Q4)
Mechanical Engineering (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0,8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 261/338 (Q4)
Environmental Engineering 138/173 (Q4)
Mechanical Engineering 495/601 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,381

2020  
Scimago
H-index
8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,197
Scimago
Quartile Score
Environmental Engineering Q4
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Q3
Mechanical Engineering Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
33/69=0,5
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Environmental Engineering 126/146 (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 269/336 (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering 512/596 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,211
Scopus
Cites
53
Scopus
Documents
41
Days from submission to acceptance 122
Days from acceptance to publication 40
Acceptance rate 86%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
6
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,123
Scimago
Quartile Score
Environmental Engineering Q4
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Q4
Mechanical Engineering Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
18/33=0,5
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Environmental Engineering 108/132 (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 242/340 (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering 481/585 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,211
Scopus
Cites
13
Scopus
Documents
5

 

Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Article Processing Charge 900 EUR/article
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2023 Online subsscription: 152 EUR / 185 USD
Print + online subscription: 177 EUR / 215 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles can be purchased at the prices indicated.

Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
2004
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
1
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia  
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1786-335X (Print)
ISSN 1787-0321 (Online)

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