Authors:
Zsuzsanna Horváth-Mezőfi Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary
Department of Livestock and Food Preservation Technology, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Emese Bátor Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Gergő Szabó Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Mónika Göb Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Zoltán Sasvár Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Lien Le Phuong Nguyen Department of Livestock and Food Preservation Technology, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Koppány Majzinger Department of Livestock and Food Preservation Technology, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Karina Ilona Hidas Department of Livestock and Food Preservation Technology, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Anna Visy Department of Livestock and Food Preservation Technology, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Géza Hitka Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Tamás Zsom Department of Postharvest, Commerce, Supply Chain and Sensory Science, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gödöllő, Hungary

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Open access

Abstract

Ethylene has key roles in triggering and speeding up ripening processes, which in tomatoes take the form of various qualitative changes. Tomatoes, just like all climacteric fruits, need a continuous ethylene exposure to accelerate ripening. Therefore, it is possible to use ripening regulators preventing ethylene binding. According to some studies, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements can be used at least as efficiently as tristimulus colorimetry classifying tomatoes based on maturity. Measurements were carried out by treating fresh tomatoes with 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) at six different stages of ripening and studying the changes in chlorophyll content related quality characteristics (e.g. surface colour, chlorophyll fluorescence) during postharvest storage (two-week refrigerated storage at 15 °C followed by a two-week shelf life). According to our results, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity of the treated samples decreased much less than those of untreated ones. Additionally, anti-ripening treatment proved to be more effective on tomatoes at an earlier stage of ripening.

Abstract

Ethylene has key roles in triggering and speeding up ripening processes, which in tomatoes take the form of various qualitative changes. Tomatoes, just like all climacteric fruits, need a continuous ethylene exposure to accelerate ripening. Therefore, it is possible to use ripening regulators preventing ethylene binding. According to some studies, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements can be used at least as efficiently as tristimulus colorimetry classifying tomatoes based on maturity. Measurements were carried out by treating fresh tomatoes with 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) at six different stages of ripening and studying the changes in chlorophyll content related quality characteristics (e.g. surface colour, chlorophyll fluorescence) during postharvest storage (two-week refrigerated storage at 15 °C followed by a two-week shelf life). According to our results, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity of the treated samples decreased much less than those of untreated ones. Additionally, anti-ripening treatment proved to be more effective on tomatoes at an earlier stage of ripening.

Introduction

Table tomato has a great importance in the whole world. The demand for fresh tomatoes and various processed tomato-based preparations is growing steadily. One important reason is that they are useful foodstuffs due to their high mineral content, antioxidant and health-protective properties. Shelf life of table tomatoes ranges from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the cultivar and storage temperature. Regulation, initiation or delay of fruit ripening usually depends on factors affecting ethylene production or action. 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) is an ethylene blocker that has been widely used to retard post-harvest ripening in a wide range of fruits (Watkins, 2006; Sisler and Serek, 2003). When bound to ethylene receptors, 1-MCP acts as an effective ethylene antagonist and its effects can be sustained over a long period of time (Sisler et al., 2003). It can therefore slow down the maturation process and the senescing of the fruit (Sisler and Serek, 1997). Nguyen and co-workers studied the effects of 1-MCP treatment on apricots and found that the treatment significantly delayed apricot ripening regardless of treatment temperature (Nguyen et al., 2016). A previous trial investigated the influence of 1-MCP treatment on Bosc Kobak pears. Under the proper conditions and maturity, the treatment could block ethylene production for 2–4 months and in turn, ripen this pear cultivar (Hitka et al., 2014). Mir and co-workers studied the effects of single, repeated and continuous 1-MCP treatments on tomatoes at different stages of maturity. They found that a single treatment delayed colour development in mature green tomatoes by about 6 days, while repeated treatments after 10 days delayed colour development by a further 8–10 days. Continuous treatment inhibited colour development throughout the application, but did not completely eliminate firmness loss (Mir et al., 2004).

New non-destructive measurement methods allow us to obtain accurate information on the post-harvest quality and its changes. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis can be used to determine the postharvest quality related maturity and changes in photosynthetically active chlorophyll content (Urbano Bron et al., 2004; Herppich et al., 2012) and the DA value (IAD, absorbance difference index) measured by the DA-meter® can also be used to monitor all of these (Costa et al., 2011; Nyasordzi et al., 2013; Hale et al., 2013; Spadoni et al., 2016). The experience of several researchers and research groups (Fatchurrahman et al., 2020; Hitka, 2011; Zsom, 2007) shows that the photosynthetic activity of horticultural crops containing chlorophyll, i.e. freshness/ripeness, quality properties, shelf life can be determined non-destructively, quickly, easily and relatively cheaply by chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy. It is a widely used measurement possibility in postharvest studies, because it can detect the effects of non-invasive pathogens, cell damage caused by external stress factors and signs of ageing before the onset of visible symptoms (Gorbe et al., 2012). Zsom-Muha and co-workers studied Golden Delicious apples at different stages of ripening using different non-destructive methods. They concluded that the different ripeness stages can be well distinguished by chlorophyll fluorescence method and DA-index® (Zsom-Muha et al., 2017).

The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy in case of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var. cerasiforme) for monitoring the maturity (in terms of commercial value). Additionally, the effect of 1-MCP treatment, which has been successfully applied to several horticultural crops such as apple (Hitka et al., 2006) on Pitenza F1 table tomato postharvest ripening was investigated.

Materials and methods

In this study, tomatoes of the Pitenza F1 variety from a farm in Budapest, Hungary were tested. Tomatoes were harvested on the day of 1-MCP treatment. After delivery to the laboratory, harvested tomatoes were classified by colour into 6 different maturity groups (Fig. 1) based on the internationally accepted CTIFL colour scale. The OECD's Guide to Objective Tests to Determine Quality Of Fruit And Vegetables, Dry And Dried Produce describes the procedure for determining colour visually using a colour scale (OECD, 2018).

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Our 6 different ripeness group

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, S1; 10.1556/446.2023.00078

Forty samples were selected per maturity stage, half of which were treated with the anti-ripening treatment, except for the fully mature (mature red) absolute control group F, which was not treated at all. The physiological plant development regulator used for the treatment was Smartfresh™ ProTabs (Authorisation No: 04.2/1181-3/2017), with an active ingredient of 2% 1-methylcyclopropene (CAS registration number 3100-04-7). Tomatoes of different stages of ripeness placed on a paper tray were placed in an airtight plastic box (V = 0.5 m3). For the samples to be treated, Smartfresh™ ProTabs tablets were added in the amounts recommended by the producer, resulting in the release of gaseous 1-MCP. The concentration of 1-MCP in air was 625 ppb. Treatment was applied at 15 °C for 12 h. After treatment, samples were stored at 15 °C for 2 weeks and then placed at 20 °C to simulate countertop (shelf-life) storage. The reduction of chlorophyll activity by post-ripening during storage was monitored using a PSI Open FluorCam FC 800-O/2020 (Photon Systems Instruments, Czech Republic) controlled by FluorCam7 (version 1.2.5.18) imaging chlorophyll fluorometer. The PSI Open FluorCam system provides chlorophyll fluorescence data not only for a specific area, but also for the entire selected sample surface. Colour change during tomato ripening is closely linked to the degradation of chlorophyll, the green pigment responsible for photosynthetic activity. Fm (maximum dark fluorescence signal), F0 (dark or minimum fluorescence signal) and Fv (variable fluorescence, Fm – F0) parameters were measured in the case of dark adapted (half an hour before the measurements) tomato samples.

In addition, the ripening and senescence of tomatoes was monitored using a FRM01-F type Vis/NIR DA-meter® (Sinteleia s.r.l., Italy) controlled by Sinteleia DA-meter® ver. 3.4, which is also based on the measurement of chlorophyll content. It is a Vis/NIR spectroscopic instrument, based on the principle of measuring the difference in absorbance between two different wavelengths. One of the measured wavelengths is the absorption peak of chlorophyll-a (670 and 720 nm) and the other is the reference wavelength during maturation to ensure minimum absorption. Chlorophyll content is determined by the DA-index® (IAD), which has a value between 0 and 5 and is calculated as follows:
IAD=A670A720
where A670 and A720 were the A values at the 670 and 720 nm wavelengths. The IAD and the DA-meter® were patented by the University of Bologna (2005).

The data obtained from the measurements were processed using the MS-Excel program. For evaluation, SPSS for Windows ver. 14 statistical software was used. Statistical analyses were performed at the 95% confidence level (α = 0.05). Results are presented as mean in figures, with bars indicating the confidence interval (95% CI) for the mean.

Results

Based on the F0 and Fm values of the treated mature green (A) and breaker (B) tomatoes (Figs 2 and 3), it can be concluded that the combined effect of treatment and cooling slowed down the ripening process significantly, with post-ripening starting to a significant extent practically only after the tomatoes were placed at 20 °C. For turning (C), pink (D) and light red (E) tomatoes, there is also a significant difference in the F0 value (Fig. 2) between treated and untreated samples on 7d, but these groups are almost completely mature by the end of week 2.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Change of minimum chlorophyll fluorescence (F0) of tomato samples (untreated on the left and 1-MCP treated on the right) measured with the PSI Open FluorCam

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, S1; 10.1556/446.2023.00078

While the F0 value is the minimum fluorescence emitted during the dark-adapted phase, the Fm value is the fluorescence produced by a short pulse of strong actinic light. The more chlorophyll a crop contains, the higher this value will be. Figure 3 shows a much clearer distinction between the mature green (A) and the breaker (B) groups of tomatoes and the other groups. There is also a significant difference between treated and untreated samples for groups A and B.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Change of maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (Fm) of tomato samples (untreated on the left and 1-MCP treated on the right) measured with the PSI Open FluorCam

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, S1; 10.1556/446.2023.00078

Fv value is the difference between Fm and F0. The Fv/Fm ratio is an indicator of the efficacy and soundness of the Photosystem II. It has a maximum value of around 0.8, but decreases as the crop matures and gets older. Our results show (Fig. 4) that there is a significant difference between treated and untreated samples for all groups from 7d onwards, clearly demonstrating the efficacy of 1-MCP treatment. Additionally, it was observed that the values started to decrease intensively after the move to room temperature.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Change of the Fv/Fm value of tomato (untreated on the left and 1-MCP treated on the right) samples

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, S1; 10.1556/446.2023.00078

The DA-index® for all samples (Fig. 5) was very similar to the Fm results obtained with the PSI Open FluorCam. In this case, the treatment was most effective also for the mature green (A) and breaker (B) tomatoes, while the control group values decreased steadily and approached 0 on about 14d, whereas the values of the treated tomatoes changed only slightly during cold storage, but after moving to ambient temperature of 20 °C, there was also an intense decrease. For the other three groups (C, D, E), there was no significant difference between treated and untreated samples, and on 7d these groups approached the value of 0 measured for the fully mature (F) group.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Change of DA-index® of tomato samples (untreated on the left and 1-MCP treated on the right) measured by the Sinteleia FRM01-F type Vis/NIR DA-meter® during storage

Citation: Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences 19, S1; 10.1556/446.2023.00078

Discussion

In agreement with the findings of Kasampalis et al. (2020), the chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy measurement method has been shown to be suitable for monitoring the ripening of tomatoes. While Ramzan et al. (2022) investigated the effect of 1-MCP on green-ripe tomatoes, Taye et al. (2019) tested the treatment on pink and red tomatoes. In both studies, the ripening of tomatoes was significantly slowed down after treatment. Based on our results obtained, it was concluded that 1-MCP anti-ripening treatment had a positive effect on all stages of tomato ripening, but only on significantly slowing down the ripening process in the mature green (A) and breaker (B) tomatoes, while prolonging the shelf life of the other three groups (C, D, E). While the treated samples could be tested for 30 days, the control samples were spoiled after 21 days. The results also showed that the treated tomatoes were fully able to ripen after treatment and that the effectiveness of the treatment highly depended on storage temperature. Even a small amount of cooling can significantly extend shelf life. Our results obtained with the DA-meter® also supported the above findings, making this instrument suitable for monitoring the mature process related colour change.

Conclusions

Based on our results obtained, the Vis/NIR DA-meter® and the chlorophyll fluorescence imaging fluorometer we used proved to be suitable for monitoring chlorophyll changes associated with tomato postharvest ripening. In evaluating the results, we found that 1-MCP treatment had a positive effect on tomato at all stages of ripening, but the earlier the stage, the more effective the treatment.

References

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    • Search Google Scholar
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    • Search Google Scholar
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    • Search Google Scholar
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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Fatchurrahman, D., Amodio, M.L., Chiara, M.L.V., Chaudhry, M.M.A., and Colelli, G. (2020). Early discrimination of mature-and immature-green tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) using fluorescence imaging method. Postharvest Biology and Technology, 169: 111287. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.postharvbio.2020.111287.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gorbe, E. and Calatayud, A. (2012). Applications of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging technique in horticultural research: a review. Scientia Horticulturae, 138: 2435. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2012.02.002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hale, G., Lopresti, J., Stefanelli, D., Jones, R., and Bonora, L. (2013). Using non-destructive methods to correlate chilling injury in nectarines with fruit maturity. Acta Horticulturae, 1012: 8389. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.1012.4.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Herppich, W.B., Foerster, J., Zeymer, J., Geyer, M., and Schlüter, O. (2012). Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging for non-destructively monitoring of changes in fresh and fresh-cut produce. In: Nunes, C. (Ed.), Proceedings of the international conference environmentally friendly and safe technologies for quality of fruits and Vegetables. Faro, Portugal, pp. 4551.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hitka, G. (2011). Kajszi szabályozott légterű tárolástechnológiájának fejlesztése, Doctoral dissertation. Corvinus University of Budapest. https://phd.lib.uni-corvinus.hu/564/.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hitka, G., Kápolna, B., Kollár, G., and Németh, A. (2006). SmartFresh™ (1-MCP) kezelés minőségmegőrző hatásának vizsgálata almafajtákon. Élelmiszervizsgálati Közlemények, 52 2006/3: 166177.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hitka, G., Zsom, T., Nguyen, L., and Balla, C. (2014). Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene on ‘Bosc Kobak' pears. Acta Alimentaria, 43(Suppl): 7377. https://doi.org/10.1556/AAlim.43.2014.Suppl.11.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kasampalis, D.S., Tsouvaltzis, P., and Siomos, A.S. (2020). Chlorophyll fluorescence, non-photochemical quenching and light harvesting complex as alternatives to color measurement, in classifying tomato fruit according to their maturity stage at harvest and in monitoring postharvest ripening during storage. Postharvest Biology and Technology, 161. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.postharvbio.2019.111036.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mir, N., Canoles, M., Beaudry, R., Baldwin, E., and Mehla, C.P. (2004). Inhibiting tomato ripening with 1-methylcyclopropene. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 129(1): 112120. https://doi.org/10.21273/JASHS.129.1.0112.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nguyen, L., Hitka, G., Zsom, T., and Kókai, Z. (2016). Application of 1-MCP on apricots at different temperatures and days after harvest. Acta Alimentaria, 45(4): 542550. https://doi.org/10.1556/066.2016.45.4.11.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nyasordzi, J., Friedman, H., Schmilovitch, Z., Ignat, T., Weksler, A., Rot, I., and Lurie, S. (2013). Utilizing the IAD index to determine internal quality attributes of apples at harvest and after storage. Postharvest Biology and Technology, 77: 8086. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.postharvbio.2012.11.002.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • OECD (2018). Guidelines on objective tests to determine quality of fruit and vegetables, dry and dried produce. p. 27. https://www.oecd.org/agriculture/fruit-vegetables/publications/guidelines-on-objective-tests.pdf.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ramzan, A., Javed, R., Zulfiqar, A., and Shakeel, S.N. (2022). Tomato post-harvest fruit ripening in Pakistan: effect of methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) in inhibiting ripening gene expression. Sains Malaysiana, 51(11): 36353646 https://doi.org/10.17576/jsm-2022-5111-10.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sisler, E. and Serek, K. (1997). Inhibitors of ethylene responses in plant at the receptor level: recent development. Physiologia Plantarum, 100: 577582. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.1997.tb03063.x.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sisler, E. and Serek, K. (2003). Compounds interacting with the ethylene receptor in plants. Plant Biology, 5473480. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2003-44782.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sisler, E., Alwan, T., Goren, R., Serek, M., and Apelbaum, A. (2003). 1-Substituted cyclopropenes: effective blocking agents for ethylene action on plants. Plant Growth Regulation, 40: 223228. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1025080420990.

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  • Spadoni, A., Cameldi, I., Noferini, M., Bonora, E., Costa, G., and Mari, M. (2016). An innovative use of DA-meter for peach fruit postharvest management. Scientia Horticulturae, 201: 140144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2016.01.041.

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  • Taye, A.M., Tilahun, S., Seo, M.H., Park, D.S., and Jeong, C.S. (2019). Effects of 1-MCP on quality and storability of cherry tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Horticulturae, 5(2): 29. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae5020029.

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  • University of Bologna patent no. MO 2005000211 (2005). Metodo ed apparato per determinare la qualita di prodotti ortofrutticoli.

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  • Watkins, C. (2006). The use of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on fruits and vegetables. Biotechnology Advances, 24: 389409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biotechadv.2006.01.005.

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  • Zsom-Muha, V., Ember, L., Hitka, G., Baranyai, L., Nguyen, L., Nagy, D., and Zsom, T. (2017). Non-destructive postharvest maturity evaluation of golden delicious apple. Hungarian Agricultural Engineering, 32/2017: 5661. https://doi.org/10.17676/HAE.2017.32.56.

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The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

 

 

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Felföldi, József

Chair of the Editorial Board Szendrő, Péter

Editorial Board

  • Beke, János (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineerin, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Fenyvesi, László (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Szendrő, Péter (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Felföldi, József (Szent István University, Faculty of Food Science, Budapest – Hungary)

 

Advisory Board

  • De Baerdemaeker, Josse (KU Leuven, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Leuven - Belgium)
  • Funk, David B. (United States Department of Agriculture | USDA • Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA), Kansas City – USA
  • Geyer, Martin (Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy (ATB), Department of Horticultural Engineering, Potsdam - Germany)
  • Janik, József (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)
  • Kutzbach, Heinz D. (Institut für Agrartechnik, Fg. Grundlagen der Agrartechnik, Universität Hohenheim – Germany)
  • Mizrach, Amos (Institute of Agricultural Engineering. ARO, the Volcani Center, Bet Dagan – Israel)
  • Neményi, Miklós (Széchenyi University, Department of Biosystems and Food Engineering, Győr – Hungary)
  • Schulze-Lammers, Peter (University of Bonn, Institute of Agricultural Engineering (ILT), Bonn – Germany)
  • Sitkei, György (University of Sopron, Institute of Wood Engineering, Sopron – Hungary)
  • Sun, Da-Wen (University College Dublin, School of Biosystems and Food Engineering, Agriculture and Food Science, Dublin – Ireland)
  • Tóth, László (Szent István University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Gödöllő – Hungary)

Prof. Felföldi, József
Institute: MATE - Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Institute of Food Science and Technology, Department of Measurements and Process Control
Address: 1118 Budapest Somlói út 14-16
E-mail: felfoldi.jozsef@uni-mate.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • CABI
  • ERIH PLUS
  • SCOPUS

2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
not indexed
Journal Impact Factor not indexed
Rank by Impact Factor

not indexed

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.191
Scimago Quartile Score

Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Industrial Manufacturing Engineering (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1.1
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Agricultural and Biological Sciences 141/213 (34th PCTL)
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 104/147 (29th PCTL)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 261/355 (26th PCTL)
Mechanical Engineering 494/631 (21st PCTL)
Environmental Engineering 145/184 (21st PCTL)
 
Scopus
SNIP
0.222

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
not indexed
Journal Impact Factor not indexed
Rank by Impact Factor

not indexed

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,141
Scimago Quartile Score Environmental Engineering (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering (Q4)
Mechanical Engineering (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0,8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 261/338 (Q4)
Environmental Engineering 138/173 (Q4)
Mechanical Engineering 495/601 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,381

2020  
Scimago
H-index
8
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,197
Scimago
Quartile Score
Environmental Engineering Q4
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Q3
Mechanical Engineering Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
33/69=0,5
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Environmental Engineering 126/146 (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 269/336 (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering 512/596 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,211
Scopus
Cites
53
Scopus
Documents
41
Days from submission to acceptance 122
Days from acceptance to publication 40
Acceptance rate 86%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
6
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,123
Scimago
Quartile Score
Environmental Engineering Q4
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Q4
Mechanical Engineering Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
18/33=0,5
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Environmental Engineering 108/132 (Q4)
Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering 242/340 (Q3)
Mechanical Engineering 481/585 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,211
Scopus
Cites
13
Scopus
Documents
5

 

Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
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Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
2004
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
1
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia  
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1786-335X (Print)
ISSN 1787-0321 (Online)

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