View More View Less
  • 1 Marcel Breuer Doctoral School, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Boszorkány u. 2, H-7624Pécs, Hungary
  • | 2 Advanced Building and Urban Design, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Boszorkány u. 2, H-7624Pécs, Hungary
Open access

Abstract

Brigittaplatz located in the 20th district of Vienna, which is a mixed culture residential community with various issues. This paper attempts to uncover the existing problems, weaknesses, potential opportunities of the site and explore a set of local interventions to accomplish site regeneration through architectural and landscape measures. Study utilizes two axes to improve and reconnect the public service, green corridor as well as the interactive relationship. All the proposed interventions are not merely public facility renewal but a new functional and social design, which is trying to reactivate the various relationships in the site that can enhance the quality of life and carry over the impact to larger scales. Authors seek a holistic approach to regenerate Brigittaplatz.

Abstract

Brigittaplatz located in the 20th district of Vienna, which is a mixed culture residential community with various issues. This paper attempts to uncover the existing problems, weaknesses, potential opportunities of the site and explore a set of local interventions to accomplish site regeneration through architectural and landscape measures. Study utilizes two axes to improve and reconnect the public service, green corridor as well as the interactive relationship. All the proposed interventions are not merely public facility renewal but a new functional and social design, which is trying to reactivate the various relationships in the site that can enhance the quality of life and carry over the impact to larger scales. Authors seek a holistic approach to regenerate Brigittaplatz.

1 Introduction

Like the trend of urban population growth around the world, the population of Vienna will increase by 280,000 in the next 25 years [1]. The dramatically increased population will bring challenges regarding transportation, settlement development and economy. As a result, the smart city Wien framework strategy 2019–2050 has been proposed. The purpose of these measures is to improve the quality of life of all residents of Vienna while minimizing natural resource consumption [2].

The study site of Brigittaplatz is situated in the 20th district of Vienna, between two riverbanks. Recently, it received an opportunity to regeneration through a research competition and the theme of it is called good urban life. The aim of this competition is the implementation of a holistic vision, a system thinking approach upon an existing Viennese quarter by using regenerative sustainable design principles. As the requirement of this competition, each group needs to provide a forward-looking vision build upon a historical-social planning base think in a present context. In addition, committee requires using multidisciplinary design approaches which must integrate with the aspects of energy supply, economy, education, social inclusion and environmental quality enhancement. This means that this competition will present an opportunity for enhancing the good urban life in all its manifestations and participants request to concentrate on social-cultural aspects, governance considerations and potential implementation scenarios that may carry over the impact to larger scales. So as to make a tangible contribution to this research, people with backgrounds in landscape, architecture and social design have participated in this research.

In the 19th century, Brigittaplatz began to become a mixed area of commerce, factories and residences. In the middle of the 20th century, it was influenced by urban modernism and formed the current pattern. Nowadays, the site equips with a market, Church, some divided green space and building blocks (Fig. 1), in which the market is very rare in the city due to the others, have been demolished. 86.368 populations are living in this district; most of them belong to the middle class. Brigittaplatz plays a transitional role because there is a new masterplan for the area in its vicinity.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Existing built environment analysis of Brigittaplatz(Source: Author's plot)

Citation: Pollack Periodica 16, 3; 10.1556/606.2021.00332

2 Aims and method

Brigittaplatz is a residential community, which has complicated built environment. The purpose of this study attempts to explore a set of local interventions and considering how to use them to accomplish site regeneration from architectural and landscape perspective, then carrying the impact to the rest of Vienna. The scope of the study contains:

  1. analyzing the current situations of the site from different aspects;

  2. identifying the perspective of interventions based on the summary; e.g. weakness and potential opportunities;

  3. providing the objectivities for the design process;

  4. giving a design concept and some detailed architecture and landscape interventions which combine energy supply, economy, education, social inclusion and environment quality enhancement.

3 Problem-oriented studies

3.1 Analyzing the situation of Brigittaplatz with the following methods

  • Study of accessibility. The existing vehicle roads, public transport, footpath and the connection with the rest of the city will be investigated. It provides evidence for later optimization design work;

  • Green space and infrastructure study. It focuses on analyzing the status of existing green space (management, existing design, the status of usage) and the association with existing urban green infrastructure;

  • Study of buildings. Existing functions and problems within the buildings can be studied; for example, whether the building needs to be modified, and whether the relationship between building and outdoor environment needs to be strengthened;

  • User study. The user in Brigittaplatz contains residents, shopkeepers and shoppers. User study gives a relatively clear goal of what design is supposed to serve;

  • Social investigation. It contains employment rate, cultural background, religion and educational level of residents;

  • Urban Heat Island (UHI) study. Brigittaplatz located in the urban area and with many hard surfaces. Several buildings have enclosed form. It is already confirmed that urban heat island effect has a strong relationship with outdoor thermal comfort and urban energy use [3, 4]. Decreasing energy use is the requirement of the government of Vienna for each regeneration project;

  • Open space and street study. This study involves the usage status, atmosphere, problems and the potentiality of transformation;

  • Study of sustainability. The current state of sustainability in the site, e.g. solid waste collection, rainwater reutilization and making a judgment on which aspects can improve sustainability in the plot;

  • Market facility study. It is a unique feature of Brigittaplatz. Study consists of analyzing the potentiality of building renovation, whether the function of entertainment, urban agriculture and commerce could combine.

3.2 What can be indicated through the studies above

  • Brigittaplatz is a residential community with a mixed culture, diverse function of buildings. The height of buildings ranges from four to eight storeys and the majority of function is residential; except from one building block where located in the southwest of Brigittaplatz. This building block has many car repairs workshops and retails; e.g. bar, café and restaurant. However, the closest street (Gerhardusgasse Street) of it is car-focused and there is no tree can be found;

  • Green space is well managed but lost the connection with the rest of green infrastructure in the city. Meanwhile, some green space has low design quality attracting few children. Generally speaking, the benefits of green space not only focus on the ecological aspect but also provide people with a social engagement space [5]. In addition, many researchers found that green space has a positive association with public health; like decreasing the risk of coronary heart diseases [6];

  • Open space has limited area and occupied by private car, which means that there is no attract point to let residents going out from buildings or appealing visitors;

  • There is more than 17% unemployment rate in this area. Only 13% population has a high educational level and more than 40% of the population was born in other countries [7];

  • The market space has a long history and attracts a lot of people, but people prefer to stay for a very short time. Majority of shops concentrate on selling food and the building height is around 4 m with a concrete structure. The large height difference with the surrounding buildings provides the possibility for the vertical transformation or renovation of the building;

  • Brigittaplatz is not very impressive regarding sustainability but it can be improved by building renovation, green space improvement and using recycled materials in the later optimization design process.

3.3 Summary of identified problems and opportunities

  • As a mixed culture residential community, open space plays an important role to enhance social communication and engagement between dwellers. The original function of open space should be recovered rather than still used as the parking lot. It is important to increase the proportion of open space since it not only provides a chance for leisure gathering but also effectively guide people to visit other functional space [8];

  • Green space must reconnect with existing urban green infrastructure, in which some of them should be redesigned to satisfy the requirement of residents; e.g. children;

  • In term of existing buildings, the enclosed building block should take some measures to mitigate the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect (Fig. 2);

  • Due to the low unemployment rate, it is necessary to provide some employment opportunities on the site. Besides, there needs a specific facility for cultural exchange;

  • The market area is a unique feature of Brigittaplatz and has a long history. There are several opportunities in market space that may make a great contribution to site regeneration. But it is necessary to consider the following questions:

    1. How to attract people to stay in the market area for more time without changing the original function;

    2. How to integrate the function of recreation, commerce and society;

    3. How to apply sustainable interventions.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

The UHI effect of Brigittaplatz(Source: Author's plot)

Citation: Pollack Periodica 16, 3; 10.1556/606.2021.00332

4 Concept

Previous steps have proved that the site has complex social, environmental and economic issues. Thus, the enhancement of these three aspects is the driver of exploring this set of local interventions. Study designated three objectives in the regenerative process, which are connection, interaction and share. These three aspects will complement and influence each other in the process of regeneration and be implemented by using architectural and landscape interventions. Besides, as a part of the urban area, it is necessary to consider the Brigittaplatz within a larger context and future plans of the city.

4.1 The idea of two axes

As mentioned before, there is a new masterplan in the area adjacent to Brigittaplatz. In this regard, study site could link with the new planning area to promote horizontal connections while expanding the scope of impact. Therefore, a horizontal axis connecting all significant parts can be created and two directions could be used for reorganizing Brigittaplatz. Gerhardusgasse Street and Hannovergasse Street cross through the site and facing east-west and north-south, respectively. They have potential to be employed as the axes. The horizontal direction is the vibrant public axis by using Gerhardusgasse Street that will connect the vivid urban life, functions and services for public use. Hannovergasse Street plays as the vertical axis which will enhance the green line created with various plants and atmospheres while reconnecting the existing green infrastructure (Fig. 3).

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Green and public axis

Citation: Pollack Periodica 16, 3; 10.1556/606.2021.00332

4.2 Architectural and landscape interventions in two axes

In terms of horizontal axis perspective, as a multicultural community, it is essential to provide residents with opportunities and places for acquaintance, communication and sharing knowledge. Social life in public spaces has a fundamental effect on the quality of life for individuals and the entire society [9]. Actively participate in social life can reduce the loneliness and increase the sense of belongs; especially in multicultural space [10]. Therefore, the functions of horizontal axis involve connecting the public function and services as well as improving the interactive relationship between residents and public life. As it was mentioned before, study found that Gerhardusgasse Street has potential to act as the horizontal axis because it passes through the middle of the site and links the Church area, green space, residential buildings and few leisure facilities (Fig. 4). Moreover, many social and public services have already been created along the west of the street; e.g. bars, café, restaurants, etc. However, the drawback is that it is car-oriented and no vegetation cover as well as low active atmosphere. Therefore, the idea is to improve and reinforce the living atmosphere of the axis by pedestrianization of this street; for instance, activating the ground level of building along the street to enhance the living atmosphere and parking-lot recover the original function of public open space. Adding some vegetation, water features and furniture along the street to enhance the natural feelings. Many other additional adjacent functions also need a consideration, which includes an inter-generational center that will construct near the kindergarten to link up different age groups and cultures. However, prohibiting vehicles and removing parking space along the street will increase congestion in the adjacent area, thus there will provide e-bikes on the street and using dynamic price for underground parking. By improvement of public services of Gerhardusgasse Street, the horizontal axis will connect residential blocks, green space, and educational facility and entertainment areas.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Study site and two axes

Citation: Pollack Periodica 16, 3; 10.1556/606.2021.00332

With regarding vertical axis, it is significantly important that the site be considered in the larger green context of the city due to biodiversity. There is already some green space in Brigittaplatz and the existing urban green infrastructure is also well connected on the north of the site. But it is broken in the south; especially from market area to Augarten Park. Meanwhile, the intensity of urban heat island effect is significantly serious in the southwest of the site. Therefore, the idea of the green axis is that creating tree corridor along Hannovergasse Street to restore the green connection with Augarten Park. As a result, the green corridor can reconnect along with the Jägerstrasse Station, Brigittaplatz and Augarten Park (Fig. 4). Besides, renovating the building blocks by changing the enclosed building forms; e.g. removing some non-functional wall to increase air convection and adding green roofs and green walls to further decrease the UHI effect. Furthermore, previous analysis revealed that some green space has low design quality attracting few children [11]. To some extent, green space plays the same role as public open space; especially for children. It provides a chance for children to playing, learning and communicating with nature. Many researches showed that preschool friendship is benefits for developing social and emotional skills as well as improving a sense of belongs and relieving stresses [12]. Therefore, another purpose of the green axis is to improve interaction by enriching the interest and diversity of green space; for example, the parking space on the south of the site will be replaced by urban agriculture, some outdoor physical and educational facilities will appear on the green space. These measures will provide informal education opportunities to children; e.g. camping, woodcraft, planting; etc.

As a unique feature of Brigittaplatz, market provides commercial opportunities for communities and adjacent areas, but the conventional architectural style and single function of it rarely attract people from other parts of the city, especially tourists. The idea is that transforming the market area into a landmark, which will bring potential commercial chances to increase job opportunities. The vision of the new market is a friendly space that combining commerce, inviting atmosphere, green space, sustainability and social engagement. However, it is important to consider several things described in section 3.3.

4.2.1 The design concept of the new market

The original buildings of the market have a large height difference with surrounding buildings. Therefore, the redesign work was carried out in the vertical direction. Honeycomb is employed as the design form because designer wants the new market area to be a home, which attracts people visiting, appealing business settling down. Moreover, honeycomb has many irregular rhombic structures. These hollow celled arrays could have different functions, some of which can be used for ventilation or lighting at the ground level (Fig. 5).

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Concept design of the new market (from south to north perspective)

Citation: Pollack Periodica 16, 3; 10.1556/606.2021.00332

4.2.2 Adding new green space and leisure space

Adding green space in the new market area can further strengthen the landscape character of the site while consolidating green connections with the rest of the city. The category of green space on the rooftop of the market is urban agriculture rather than grassland because it may bring commercial benefits to the site; for instance, the management of urban agriculture can provide job opportunities and the fruits of plants can be sold in the market. This forms a small cyclic system. The leisure spaces mainly concentrate on the north side of the new market, including the rooftop and ground floor that was previously used as the parking lot. The roof uses different heights in this area (Fig. 6), which trying to enhance the visual rhythm and divide the space into different size to meet the social needs of different ages. The water features are installed on the ground floor enriching the landscape experience and elements. These measures will provide a calm, comfortable and attractive environment for dwellers, tourists and workers.

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Leisure space of the ground level

Citation: Pollack Periodica 16, 3; 10.1556/606.2021.00332

4.2.3 Improving the identifiability of Brigittaplatz

In order to enhance the integrity of the site, the rhombic structure is also used as the design form of furniture; e.g. bench, guidepost and art installation. The scattered furniture improves the recognition and orientation of the Brigittaplatz.

4.2.4 Realizing sustainability

The market rooftop is equipped with many solar panels, generating electricity for ground lighting. After serious calculations, there are 4,200 square meters available space on the rooftop of the new market, in which 1,200 square meters are used to install solar panels. The outcome is that energy production 140 milliwatt-hour (mWh) per year however the consumption is 48.6 mWh each year. Besides, the large areas of urban agriculture on the rooftop could absorb heat and slow down the UHI effect. Meanwhile, the rainwater will be collected and stored in a tank that used for irrigating the urban agriculture.

5 Conclusion

As a pilot research project of scale jumping, study treats the enhancement of social, environmental and economic aspects as the starting point of exploring the local acupuncture method. By adding and enhancing the public services along Gerhardusgasse Street, the horizontal axis connects the vivid urban life and provides an attractive street to let people going out from buildings. It improves the interactive relationship between public life and residents. In addition, the proposed tree corridor along the Hannovergasse Street restores the green connection between Jägerstrasse Station site and Augarten Park. The green roof and green wall on the building blocks and market area not only mitigates the UHI effect but also further improving the landscape characters of the site. The green axis also provides some informal educational opportunities for residents in sharing knowledge by installing urban agriculture and outdoor educational facilities. As for the core area of Brigittaplatz, the original market was renovated into a landmark, which will bring potential commercial chance for increasing job opportunity. This landmark delivers a space for people from different background of culture to acquaintance, communicate and share their lives. In addition, the self-supply energy system transforms the market into a sustainable building. Those measures stimulate the Brigittaplatz to regeneration from social, environmental and economic aspects and the impact will extend beyond the boundaries of the site. Finally, this research project gives researchers with different backgrounds a comprehensive perspective to explore regional regeneration while provides some useful feedback and ideas for local government.

Acknowledgement

Qingchang He is very grateful to his classmates who have a similar research topic and giving some suggestions.

References

  • [1]

    R. Bauer, C. Aberer, C. Fendt, G. Haydn, W. Remmel, E. Seibold, and F. Trautinger, Vienna in figures, population projection Vienna 2018 summary. Vienna: Municipal Department 23 (MA 23) Economic Affairs, Labor and Statistics, 2018.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [2]

    R. Bauer , C. Fendt , D. Jost , M. Lukacsy , R. Seidl , and F. Trautinger. Adoption by the city council of Vienna of a new smart city framework strategy (in Austrian). [Online]. Available: https://www.wien.gv.at/presse/2019/06/27/wiener-gemeinderat-beschliesst-neue-smart-city-rahmenstrategie-bis-2050 Accessed:Dec. 28, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [3]

    F. Szkordilisz , “Mitigation of urban heat island by green spaces,” Pollack Period., no. 1, pp. 91100, 2014.

  • [4]

    X. Liu and J. Sweeney , “Modeling the impact of urban form on household energy demand and related CO2 emissions in the Greater Dublin Region,” Energy Pol., vol. 46, pp. 359369, 2012.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [5]

    V. Jennings and O. Bamkole , “The relationship between social cohesion and urban green space: An avenue for health promotion,” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 452466, 2019.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [6]

    J. Maas , R. A. Verheij , P. Spreeuwenberg , and P. P. Groenewegen , “Physical activity as a possible mechanism behind the relationship between green space and health: a multilevel analysis,” BMC Public Health, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 113, 2008.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [7]

    Province of Vienna, Vienna in figures 2020,” Municipal Department. Statistics Vienna, Austria, August 2020.

  • [8]

    P. Sendra , “Rethinking urban public space, Assemblage thinking and the uses of disorder,” City, Anal. Urban Change Theor. Action, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 820836, 2015.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [9]

    W. H. Whyte , The Social Life of Small Urban Space, Project for Public Spaces, NY, 1980.

  • [10]

    Sz. Portschy , “Community participation in sustainable urban growth, case study of Almere, The Netherlands,” Pollack Period., vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 145155, 2016.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [11]

    Y. Wang , T. Palonen , T. R. Hurme , and J. Kinos , “Do you want to play with me today? Friendship stability among preschool children,” Eur. Early Child. Edu. Res. J., vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 170184, 2019.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [12]

    D. Sikorska , F. Łaszkiewicz , K. Krauze , and P. Sikorski , “The role of informal green spaces in reducing inequalities in urban green space availability to children and seniors,” Environ. Sci. Pol., vol. 108, pp. 144154, 2020.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [1]

    R. Bauer, C. Aberer, C. Fendt, G. Haydn, W. Remmel, E. Seibold, and F. Trautinger, Vienna in figures, population projection Vienna 2018 summary. Vienna: Municipal Department 23 (MA 23) Economic Affairs, Labor and Statistics, 2018.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [2]

    R. Bauer , C. Fendt , D. Jost , M. Lukacsy , R. Seidl , and F. Trautinger. Adoption by the city council of Vienna of a new smart city framework strategy (in Austrian). [Online]. Available: https://www.wien.gv.at/presse/2019/06/27/wiener-gemeinderat-beschliesst-neue-smart-city-rahmenstrategie-bis-2050 Accessed:Dec. 28, 2020.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [3]

    F. Szkordilisz , “Mitigation of urban heat island by green spaces,” Pollack Period., no. 1, pp. 91100, 2014.

  • [4]

    X. Liu and J. Sweeney , “Modeling the impact of urban form on household energy demand and related CO2 emissions in the Greater Dublin Region,” Energy Pol., vol. 46, pp. 359369, 2012.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [5]

    V. Jennings and O. Bamkole , “The relationship between social cohesion and urban green space: An avenue for health promotion,” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 452466, 2019.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [6]

    J. Maas , R. A. Verheij , P. Spreeuwenberg , and P. P. Groenewegen , “Physical activity as a possible mechanism behind the relationship between green space and health: a multilevel analysis,” BMC Public Health, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 113, 2008.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [7]

    Province of Vienna, Vienna in figures 2020,” Municipal Department. Statistics Vienna, Austria, August 2020.

  • [8]

    P. Sendra , “Rethinking urban public space, Assemblage thinking and the uses of disorder,” City, Anal. Urban Change Theor. Action, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 820836, 2015.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [9]

    W. H. Whyte , The Social Life of Small Urban Space, Project for Public Spaces, NY, 1980.

  • [10]

    Sz. Portschy , “Community participation in sustainable urban growth, case study of Almere, The Netherlands,” Pollack Period., vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 145155, 2016.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [11]

    Y. Wang , T. Palonen , T. R. Hurme , and J. Kinos , “Do you want to play with me today? Friendship stability among preschool children,” Eur. Early Child. Edu. Res. J., vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 170184, 2019.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • [12]

    D. Sikorska , F. Łaszkiewicz , K. Krauze , and P. Sikorski , “The role of informal green spaces in reducing inequalities in urban green space availability to children and seniors,” Environ. Sci. Pol., vol. 108, pp. 144154, 2020.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
Submit Your Manuscript
 
The author instructions template is available in MS Word.
Please, download the file from HERE.

 

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Iványi, Amália

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Iványi, Péter

 

Scientific Secretary

Miklós M. Iványi

Editorial Board

  • Bálint Bachmann (Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Jeno Balogh (Department of Civil Engineering Technology, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA)
  • Radu Bancila (Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Terrestrial Communications Ways, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, “Politehnica” University Timisoara, Romania)
  • Charalambos C. Baniotopolous (Department of Civil Engineering, Chair of Sustainable Energy Systems, Director of Resilience Centre, School of Engineering, University of Birmingham, U.K.)
  • Oszkar Biro (Graz University of Technology, Institute of Fundamentals and Theory in Electrical Engineering, Austria)
  • Ágnes Borsos (Institute of Architecture, Department of Interior, Applied and Creative Design, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Matteo Bruggi (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ambientale, Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
  • Ján Bujňák (Department of Structures and Bridges, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Žilina, Slovakia)
  • Anikó Borbála Csébfalvi (Department of Civil Engineering, Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Mirjana S. Devetaković (Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade, Serbia)
  • Szabolcs Fischer (Department of Transport Infrastructure and Water Resources Engineering, Faculty of Architerture, Civil Engineering and Transport Sciences Széchenyi István University, Győr, Hungary)
  • Radomir Folic (Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad Serbia)
  • Jana Frankovská (Department of Geotechnics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia)
  • János Gyergyák (Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Kay Hameyer (Chair in Electromagnetic Energy Conversion, Institute of Electrical Machines, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University, Germany)
  • Elena Helerea (Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Transilvania University of Brasov, Romania)
  • Ákos Hutter (Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technolgy, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Károly Jármai (Institute of Energy and Chemical Machinery, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary)
  • Teuta Jashari-Kajtazi (Department of Architecture, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Prishtina, Kosovo)
  • Róbert Kersner (Department of Technical Informatics, Institute of Information and Electrical Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Rita Kiss  (Biomechanical Cooperation Center, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • István Kistelegdi  (Department of Building Structures and Energy Design, Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Stanislav Kmeť (President of University Science Park TECHNICOM, Technical University of Kosice, Slovakia)
  • Imre Kocsis  (Department of Basic Engineering Research, Faculty of Engineering, University of Debrecen, Hungary)
  • László T. Kóczy (Department of Information Sciences, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Informatics and Electrical Engineering, University of Győr, Hungary)
  • Dražan Kozak (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Croatia)
  • György L. Kovács (Department of Technical Informatics, Institute of Information and Electrical Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Balázs Géza Kövesdi (Department of Structural Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Budapest University of Engineering and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Tomáš Krejčí (Department of Mechanics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic)
  • Jaroslav Kruis (Department of Mechanics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic)
  • Miklós Kuczmann (Department of Automations, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Informatics and Electrical Engineering, Széchenyi István University, Győr, Hungary)
  • Tibor Kukai (Department of Engineering Studies, Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Maria Jesus Lamela-Rey (Departamento de Construcción e Ingeniería de Fabricación, University of Oviedo, Spain)
  • János Lógó  (Department of Structural Mechanics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary)
  • Carmen Mihaela Lungoci (Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Universitatea Transilvania Brasov, Romania)
  • Frédéric Magoulés (Department of Mathematics and Informatics for Complex Systems, Centrale Supélec, Université Paris Saclay, France)
  • Gabriella Medvegy (Department of Interior, Applied and Creative Design, Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Tamás Molnár (Department of Visual Studies, Institute of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Ferenc Orbán (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Zoltán Orbán (Department of Civil Engineering, Institute of Smart Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Dmitrii Rachinskii (Department of Mathematical Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas, USA)
  • Chro Radha (Chro Ali Hamaradha) (Sulaimani Polytechnic University, Technical College of Engineering, Department of City Planning, Kurdistan Region, Iraq)
  • Maurizio Repetto (Department of Energy “Galileo Ferraris”, Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
  • Zoltán Sári (Department of Technical Informatics, Institute of Information and Electrical Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Grzegorz Sierpiński (Department of Transport Systems and Traffic Engineering, Faculty of Transport, Silesian University of Technology, Katowice, Poland)
  • Zoltán Siménfalvi (Institute of Energy and Chemical Machinery, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Informatics, University of Miskolc, Hungary)
  • Andrej Šoltész (Department of Hydrology, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia)
  • Zsolt Szabó (Faculty of Information Technology and Bionics, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Hungary)
  • Mykola Sysyn (Chair of Planning and Design of Railway Infrastructure, Institute of Railway Systems and Public Transport, Technical University of Dresden, Germany)
  • András Timár (Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Barry H. V. Topping (Heriot-Watt University, UK, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Pécs, Hungary)

POLLACK PERIODICA
Pollack Mihály Faculty of Engineering
Institute: University of Pécs
Address: Boszorkány utca 2. H–7624 Pécs, Hungary
Phone/Fax: (36 72) 503 650

E-mail: peter.ivanyi@mik.pte.hu 

or amalia.ivanyi@mik.pte.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • SCOPUS

 

2020  
Scimago
H-index
11
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,257
Scimago
Quartile Score
Civil and Structural Engineering Q3
Computer Science Applications Q3
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q3
Modeling and Simulation Q3
Software Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
340/243=1,4
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Civil and Structural Engineering 219/318 (Q3)
Computer Science Applications 487/693 (Q3)
General Materials Science 316/455 (Q3)
Modeling and Simulation 217/290 (Q4)
Software 307/389 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
1,09
Scopus
Cites
321
Scopus
Documents
67
Days from submission to acceptance 136
Days from acceptance to publication 239
Acceptance
Rate
48%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
10
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,262
Scimago
Quartile Score
Civil and Structural Engineering Q3
Computer Science Applications Q3
Materials Science (miscellaneous) Q3
Modeling and Simulation Q3
Software Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
269/220=1,2
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Civil and Structural Engineering 206/310 (Q3)
Computer Science Applications 445/636 (Q3)
General Materials Science 295/460 (Q3)
Modeling and Simulation 212/274 (Q4)
Software 304/373 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,933
Scopus
Cites
290
Scopus
Documents
68
Acceptance
Rate
67%

 

Pollack Periodica
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 900 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2021 Online subsscription: 321  EUR / 402 USD
Print + online subscription: 384 EUR / 480 USD
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 327 EUR / 411 USD 321
Print + online subscription: 393 EUR / 492 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles are sold on the displayed price.

 

Pollack Periodica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2006
Publication
Programme
2021 Volume 16
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
3
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1788-1994 (Print)
ISSN 1788-3911 (Online)

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Apr 2021 0 0 0
May 2021 0 0 0
Jun 2021 0 0 0
Jul 2021 0 0 0
Aug 2021 0 0 0
Sep 2021 0 0 0
Oct 2021 0 15 8