View More View Less
  • 1 School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, 3001, Victoria, Australia
  • | 2 School of Design and Social Context, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Open access

Abstract

Background and aims

Recent research suggests that use of social networking sites can be addictive for some individuals. Due to the link between motivations for media use and the development of addiction, this systematic review examines Facebook-related uses and gratifications research and Facebook addiction research.

Method

Searches of three large academic databases revealed 24 studies examining the uses and gratifications of Facebook, and nine studies of Facebook addiction.

Results

Comparison of uses and gratifications research reveals that the most popular motives for Facebook use are relationship maintenance, passing time, entertainment, and companionship. These motivations may be related to Facebook addiction through use that is habitual, excessive, or motivated by a desire for mood alteration. Examination of Facebook addiction research indicates that Facebook use can become habitual or excessive, and some addicts use the site to escape from negative moods. However, examination of Facebook addiction measures highlights inconsistency in the field.

Discussion

There is some evidence to support the argument that uses and gratifications of Facebook are linked with Facebook addiction. Furthermore, it appears as if the social skill model of addiction may explain Facebook addiction, but inconsistency in the measurement of this condition limits the ability to provide conclusive arguments.

Conclusions

This paper recommends that further research be performed to establish the links between uses and gratifications and Facebook addiction. Furthermore, in order to enhance the construct validity of Facebook addiction, researchers should take a more systematic approach to assessment.

  • E. Aboujaoude L. M. G. N. L. M. D. Koran R. T. Serpe 2006 Potential markers for problematic Internet use: A telephone survey of 2,513 adults CNS Spectrums 11 750 755.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • A. M. Aladwani 2014 Gravitating towards Facebook (GoToFB): What is it? And how can it be measured? Computers in Human Behavior 33 270 278.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Alexa Internet 2013 Alexa Top 500 Global Sites Alexa.com.

  • S. Alhabash Y. Chiang K. Huang 2014 MAM & U&G in Taiwan: Differences in the uses and gratifications of Facebook as a function of motivational reactivity Computers in Human Behavior 35 423 430.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • S. Alhabash H. Park A. Kononova Y.-H. Chiang K. Wise 2012 Exploring the motivations of Facebook use in Taiwan Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 15 304 311.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • American Psychiatric Association 2013 Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders 5th ed. American Psychiatric Association Arlington, VA.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • C. S. Andreassen T. Torsheim G. S. Brunborg S. Pallesen 2012 Development of a Facebook Addiction Scale Psychological Reports 110 501 517.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • V. Balakrishnan A. Shamim 2013 Malaysian Facebookers: Motives and addictive behaviours unraveled Computers in Human Behavior 29 1342 1349.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • D. M. Boyd N. B. Ellison 2007 Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13 210 230.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • R. I. F. Brown 1997 A theoretical model of the behavioural addictions — Applied to offending J. E. Hodge M. McMurran C. R. Hollin Addicted to crime John Wiley Chichester, UK 13 65.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • E. Çam O. İşbulan 2012 A new addiction for teacher candidates: Social networks The Turkish Online Journal of Education Technology 11 3 14 19.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • S. E. Caplan 2005 A social skill account of problematic Internet use Journal of Communication 55 721 736.

  • S. E. Caplan 2007 Relations among loneliness, social anxiety, and problematic Internet use CyberPsychology & Behavior 10 234 242.

  • S. E. Caplan 2010 Theory and measurement of generalized problematic Internet use: A two-step approach Computers in Human Behavior 26 1089 1097.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • G. M. Chen 2011 Tweet this: A uses and gratifications perspective on how active Twitter use gratifies a need to connect with others Computers in Human Behavior 27 755 762.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • H. Chen Y. Kim 2013 Problematic use of social network sites: The interactive relationship between gratifications sought and privacy concerns Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 16 806 812.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • C. M. K. Cheung P. Chiu M. K. O. Lee 2011 Online social networks: Why do students use Facebook? Computers in Human Behavior 27 1337 1343.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • A. Dunne M. Lawlor J. Rowley 2010 Young people's use of online social networking sites — A uses and gratifications perspective Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing 4 46 58.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • N. B. Ellison C. Steinfield C. Lampe 2007 The benefits of Facebook “friends”: Social capital and college students’ use of online social network sites Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 12 1143 1168.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • R. A. Elphinston P. Noller 2011 Facebook intrusion and the implications for romantic jealousy and relationship satisfaction Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 14 631 635.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Facebook 2014 Company info: Facebook newsroom newsroom.fb.com.

  • G. Floros K. Siomos 2013 The relationship between optimal parenting, Internet addiction and motives for social networking in adolescence Psychiatry Research 209 529 534.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • S. K. Foregger 2008 Uses and gratifications of Facebook.com.

  • M. N. Giannakos K. Chorianopoulos K. Giotopoulos P. Vlamos 2013 Using Facebook out of habit Behaviour & Information Technology 32 594 602.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • M. D. Griffiths 1999 Internet addiction: Internet fuels other addictions Student British Medical Journal 7 428 429.

  • M. D. Griffiths 2000 Internet addiction — Time to be taken seriously? Addiction Research 8 413 418.

  • M. D. Griffiths 2012 Facebook addiction: Concerns, criticism, and recommendations — A response to Andreassen and colleagues Psychological Reports 110 518 520.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • M. D. Griffiths 2013 Social networking addiction: Emerging themes and issues Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy 4 e118.

  • M. D. Griffiths D. J. Kuss Z. Demetrovics 2014 Social networking addiction: An overview of preliminary findings K. P. Rosenberg L. C. Feder Behavioral addictions: Criteria, evidence, and treatment Academic Press London 119 141.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • B. Gülnar S. Balcý V. Çakýr 2010 Motivations of Facebook, You Tube and similar web sites users Bilig 54 161 184.

  • E. Hargittai 2008 Whose space? Differences among users and non-users of social network sites Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 13 276 297.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • M. Hart 2011 A study on the motives of high school and undergraduate college students for using the social network site Facebook.

  • E. E. Hollenbaugh A. L. Ferris 2014 Facebook self-disclosure: Examining the role of traits, social cohesion, and motives Computers in Human Behavior 30 50 58.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • F. Hong D. Huang H. Lin S. Chiu 2014 Analysis of the psychological traits, Facebook usage, and Facebook addiction model of Taiwanese university students Telematics and Informatics 31 597 606.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • H. Huang 2012 Social media addiction among adolescents in urban China: An examination of sociopsychological traits, uses and gratifications, academic performance, and social capital.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • D. Hunt D. Atkin A. Krishnan 2012 The influence of computer-mediated communication apprehension on motives for Facebook use Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 56 197 202.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • A. N. Joinson 2008 ’Looking at’, ‘looking up’ or ‘keeping up with’ people? Motives and uses of Facebook Presented at the CHI 2008 Florence, Italy.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • E. Katz J. G. Blumler M. Gurevitch 1973 Uses and gratifications research The Public Opinion Quarterly 37 509 523.

  • M. Koc S. Gulyagci 2013 Facebook addiction among Turkish college students: The role of psychological health, demographic, and usage characteristics CyberPsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 16 279 284.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • D. J. Kuss M. D. Griffiths 2011 Excessive online social networking — Can adolescents become addicted to Facebook? Education and Health 29 68 71.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • D. J. Kuss M. D. Griffiths L. Karila J. Billieux 2014 Internet addiction: A systematic review of epidemiological research for the last decade Current Pharmaceutical Design 20 4026 4052.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • R. LaRose J. Kim W. Peng 2010 Social networking: Addictive, compulsive, problematic, or just another media habit? Z. Papacharissi A networked self: Identity, community, and culture on social network sites Taylor & Francis New York, NY.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • R. LaRose D. Mastro M. S. Eastin 2001 Understanding Internet usage: A social-cognitive approach to uses and gratifications Social Science Computer Review 19 395 413.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Z. W. Y. Lee C. M. K. Cheung D. R. Thadani 2012 An investigation into the problematic use of Facebook Proceedings of the 45th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 1768 1776.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • D. T. Leon R. J. Rotunda 2000 Contrasting case studies of frequent Internet use Journal of College Student Psychotherapy 14 9 18.

  • C. L. Lortie M. J. Guitton 2013 Internet addiction assessment tools: Dimensional structure and methodological status Addiction 108 1207 1216.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • G. J. Meerkerk R. J. van den Eijnden A. A. Vermulst H. F. Garretsen 2009 The Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS): Some psychometric properties CyberPsychology & Behavior 12 1 6.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • J. Morahan-Martin P. Shumacher 2000 Incidence and correlates of pathological Internet use among college students Computers in Human Behavior 16 13 29.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • I. R. Mull S. Lee 2014 “PIN” pointing the motivational dimensions behind Pinterest Computers in Human Behavior 33 192 200.

  • C. P. O'Brien 2010 Commentary on Tao et al. (2010): Internet addiction and DSM-V Addiction 105 595.

  • P. Pai D. C. Arnott 2013 User adoption of social networking sites: Eliciting uses and gratifications through a means-end approach Computers in Human Behavior 29 1039 1053.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • E. T. Panek Y. Nardis S. Konrath 2013 Mirror or megaphone?: How relationships between narcissism and social networking site use differ on Facebook and Twitter Computers in Human Behavior 29 2004 2012.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Z. Papacharissi A. Mendelson 2011 Toward a new(er) sociability: Uses, gratifications and social capital on Facebook S. Papathanassopoulos Media perspectives for the 21st century Routledge Oxon, UK 212 230.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • A. K. Przybylski K. Murayama C. R. DeHaan V. Gladwell 2013 Motivational, emotional, and behavioral correlates of fear of missing out Computers in Human Behavior 29 1841 1848.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • J. Raacke J. Bonds-Raacke 2008 MySpace and Facebook: Applying the uses and gratifications theory to exploring friend-networking sites Cyberpsychology & Behavior 11 169 174.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • P. Sheldon 2008 The relationship between unwillingness-to-communicate and students’ Facebook use Journal of Media Psychology: Theories, Methods, and Applications 20 67 75.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • P. Sheldon 2009 Maintain or develop new relationships? Gender differences in Facebook use Rocky Mountain Communication Review 6 51 56.

  • H. Shoenberger E. Tandoc Jr. 2014 Updated statuses: Understanding Facebook use through explicit and implicit measures of attitudes and motivations Online Journal of Communication and Media Technologies 4 217 244.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • A. D. Smock N. B. Ellison C. Lampe D. Y. Wohn 2011 Facebook as a toolkit: A uses and gratifications approach to unbundling feature use Computers in Human Behavior 27 2322 2329.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • S. Sofiah S. Z. Omar J. Bolong M. N. Osman 2011 Facebook addiction among female university students Revista De Administratie Publica Si Politici Sociale 2 95 109.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • I. Song R. LaRose M. S. Eastin C. A. Lin 2004 Internet gratifications and internet addiction: On the uses and abuses of new media CyberPsychology & Behavior 7 384 394.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • T. Spiliotopoulos I. Oakley 2013 Understanding motivations for Facebook use: Usage metrics, network structure, and privacy Paper presented at CHI 2013 Paris, France.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • W. P. Special K. T. Li-Barber 2012 Self-disclosure and student satisfaction with Facebook Computers in Human Behavior 28 624 630.

  • A. Spraggins 2009 Problematic use of online social networking sites for college students: Prevalence, predictors, and association with well being.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • E. Teppers K. Luyckx T. A. Klimstra L. Goossens 2014 Loneliness and Facebook motives in adolescence: A longitudinal inquiry into directionality of effect Journal of Adolescence 37 691 699.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • F. Tonioni L. D'Alessandris C. Lai D. Martinelli S. Corvino Vasale F. Fanella P. Aceto P. Bria 2012 Internet addiction: Hours spent online, behaviors and psychological symptoms General Hospital Psychiatry 34 80 87.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • L. P. Tosun 2012 Motives for Facebook use and expressing “true self” on the Internet Computers in Human Behavior 28 1510 1517.

  • R. Uysal S. A. Satici A. Akin 2014 Mediating effect of Facebook addiction on the relationship between subjective vitality and subjective happiness Psychological Reports: Mental & Physical Health 113 948 953.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • A. Valentine 2012 Uses and gratifications of facebook members 35 years and older.

  • C. Wan 2009 Gratifications and loneliness as predictors of campus — SNS websites addiction and usage pattern among Chinese college students.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • R. E. Wilson S. D. Gosling L. T. Graham 2012 A review of Facebook research in the social sciences Perspectives in Psychological Science 7 203 220.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • J. Wiseman 2008 Facebook Chat: Now We're Talking facebook.com.

  • C. Yang B. B. Brown 2013 Motives for using Facebook, patterns of Facebook activities, and late adolescents’ social adjustment to college Journal of Youth and Adolescence 42 403 416.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • K. S. Young 1998 Internet addiction: The emergence of a new clinical disorder Cyberpsychology & Behavior 1 237 244.

  • K. S. Young 1998 Caught in the net: How to recognize the signs of Internet addiction — and a winning strategy for recovery John Wiley & Sons New York, NY.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • K. S. Young M. Pistner J. O'Mara J. Buchanan 1999 Cyber disorders: The mental health concern for the new millennium Cyberpsychology & Behavior 2 475 479.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Z. Zaremohzzabieh B. A. Samah S. Z. Omar J. Bolong N. A. Kamarudin 2014 Addictive Facebook use among university students Asian Social Science 10 107 116.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE

Dr. Zsolt Demetrovics
Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University
Address: Izabella u. 46. H-1064 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: +36-1-461-2681
E-mail: jba@ppk.elte.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Web of Science [Science Citation Index Expanded (also known as SciSearch®)
  • Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition
  • Social Sciences Citation Index®
  • Journal Citation Reports/ Social Sciences Edition
  • Current Contents®/Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • EBSCO
  • GoogleScholar
  • PsycINFO
  • PubMed Central
  • SCOPUS
  • Medline
  • CABI
2020  
Total Cites 4024
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
6,756
Rank by Psychiatry (SSCI) 12/143 (Q1)
Impact Factor Psychiatry 19/156 (Q1)
Impact Factor 6,052
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 8,735
Impact Factor
Journal  1,48
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Psychiatry 24/250 (Q1)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 86
Items
Total 74
Articles
Total 12
Reviews
Scimago 47
H-index
Scimago 2,265
Journal Rank
Scimago Clinical Psychology Q1
Quartile Score Psychiatry and Mental Health Q1
  Medicine (miscellaneous) Q1
Scopus 3593/367=9,8
Scite Score  
Scopus Clinical Psychology 7/283 (Q1)
Scite Score Rank Psychiatry and Mental Health 22/502 (Q1)
Scopus 2,026
SNIP  
Days from  38
submission  
to 1st decision  
Days from  37
acceptance  
to publication  
Acceptance 31%
Rate  

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
2 184
Impact Factor 5,143
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
4,346
5 Year
Impact Factor
5,758
Immediacy
Index
0,587
Citable
Items
75
Total
Articles
67
Total
Reviews
8
Cited
Half-Life
3,3
Citing
Half-Life
6,8
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00597
Article Influence
Score
1,447
% Articles
in
Citable Items
89,33
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,7294
Average
IF
Percentile
87,923
Scimago
H-index
37
Scimago
Journal Rank
1,767
Scopus
Scite Score
2540/376=6,8
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Cllinical Psychology 16/275 (Q1)
Medicine (miscellenous) 31/219 (Q1)
Psychiatry and Mental Health 47/506 (Q1)
Scopus
SNIP
1,441
Acceptance
Rate
32%

 

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Publication Model Gold Open Access
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 850 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription Information Gold Open Access
Purchase per Title  

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2011
Publication
Programme
2021 Volume 10
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Eötvös Loránd Tudományegyetem
Founder's
Address
H-1053 Budapest, Hungary Egyetem tér 1-3.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2062-5871 (Print)
ISSN 2063-5303 (Online)

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Zsolt DEMETROVICS

Assistant Editor(s): Csilla ÁGOSTON

Associate Editors

  • Judit BALÁZS (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Joel BILLIEUX (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Matthias BRAND (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
  • Anneke GOUDRIAAN (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Daniel KING (Flinders University, Australia)
  • Ludwig KRAUS (IFT Institute for Therapy Research, Germany)
  • H. N. Alexander LOGEMANN (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Anikó MARÁZ (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany)
  • Astrid MÜLLER (Hannover Medical School, Germany)
  • Marc N. POTENZA (Yale University, USA)
  • Hans-Jurgen RUMPF (University of Lübeck, Germany)
  • Attila SZABÓ (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Róbert URBÁN (ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Aviv M. WEINSTEIN (Ariel University, Israel)

Editorial Board

  • Max W. ABBOTT (Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand)
  • Elias N. ABOUJAOUDE (Stanford University School of Medicine, USA)
  • Hojjat ADELI (Ohio State University, USA)
  • Alex BALDACCHINO (University of Dundee, United Kingdom)
  • Alex BLASZCZYNSKI (University of Sidney, Australia)
  • Kenneth BLUM (University of Florida, USA)
  • Henrietta BOWDEN-JONES (Imperial College, United Kingdom)
  • Beáta BÖTHE (University of Montreal, Canada)
  • Wim VAN DEN BRINK (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Gerhard BÜHRINGER (Technische Universität Dresden, Germany)
  • Sam-Wook CHOI (Eulji University, Republic of Korea)
  • Damiaan DENYS (University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Jeffrey L. DEREVENSKY (McGill University, Canada)
  • Naomi FINEBERG (University of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom)
  • Marie GRALL-BRONNEC (University Hospital of Nantes, France)
  • Jon E. GRANT (University of Minnesota, USA)
  • Mark GRIFFITHS (Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom)
  • Heather HAUSENBLAS (Jacksonville University, USA)
  • Tobias HAYER (University of Bremen, Germany)
  • Susumu HIGUCHI (National Hospital Organization Kurihama Medical and Addiction Center, Japan)
  • David HODGINS (University of Calgary, Canada)
  • Eric HOLLANDER (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA)
  • Jaeseung JEONG (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea)
  • Yasser KHAZAAL (Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland)
  • Orsolya KIRÁLY (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Emmanuel KUNTSCHE (La Trobe University, Australia)
  • Hae Kook LEE (The Catholic University of Korea, Republic of Korea)
  • Michel LEJOXEUX (Paris University, France)
  • Anikó MARÁZ (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Giovanni MARTINOTTI (‘Gabriele d’Annunzio’ University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy)
  • Frederick GERARD MOELLER (University of Texas, USA)
  • Daniel Thor OLASON (University of Iceland, Iceland)
  • Nancy PETRY (University of Connecticut, USA)
  • Bettina PIKÓ (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Afarin RAHIMI-MOVAGHAR (Teheran University of Medical Sciences, Iran)
  • József RÁCZ (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary)
  • Rory C. REID (University of California Los Angeles, USA)
  • Marcantanio M. SPADA (London South Bank University, United Kingdom)
  • Daniel SPRITZER (Study Group on Technological Addictions, Brazil)
  • Dan J. STEIN (University of Cape Town, South Africa)
  • Sherry H. STEWART (Dalhousie University, Canada)
  • Attila SZABÓ (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Ferenc TÚRY (Semmelweis University, Hungary)
  • Alfred UHL (Austrian Federal Health Institute, Austria)
  • Johan VANDERLINDEN (University Psychiatric Center K.U.Leuven, Belgium)
  • Alexander E. VOISKOUNSKY (Moscow State University, Russia)
  • Kimberly YOUNG (Center for Internet Addiction, USA)

 

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Jun 2021 0 378 301
Jul 2021 0 317 255
Aug 2021 0 310 223
Sep 2021 0 385 310
Oct 2021 0 608 590
Nov 2021 0 638 547
Dec 2021 0 140 129